The Wire

Season 3 Episode 12

Mission Accomplished

3
Aired Sunday 9:00 PM Dec 19, 2004 on HBO
9.4
out of 10
User Rating
192 votes
2

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

EDIT
"We fight on that lie." - Slim Charles

A reticent Avon readies his troops for a seemingly endless war against Marlo. Meanwhile, as the detail works towards the top rungs of the Barksdale organization, McNulty reassesses his pursuit of Stringer Bell and the path he's chosen for himself. While Royce continues to grapple with Amsterdam, Burrell offers a deal to minimize the fallout, even as Colvin's idea becomes public knowledge. Carcetti's ambition becomes obvious to his friend and fellow councilman Tony Gray, even as Gray has disclosed his own political plans. Cutty struggles to keep his young boxers off the corners, as he and Fruit cross paths once again. Bubbles offers his view of the world, both as it is and once was.moreless

Who was the Episode MVP ?

Wednesday
No results found.
Thursday
No results found.
Friday
No results found.
SUBMIT REVIEW
  • There is nothing more to be desired

    10
    And again, with frightening accuracy, "The Wire" hits all its marks, satisfies on every level, succeeds more than you could imagine. The final episode of season 3, like every season finale, manages to conclude what has to be concluded and to leave open what needs to be left open.



    It is another episode full of exhilirating moments, of amazing writing and acting, and at the same time, because all of the events we followed through so faithfully find an end, with such an emotional impact, that it's hard to hold back tears of both joy and sadness.



    Dennis continues his ongoing fight with life, a fight he'll probably never give up, no matter how many blows he has to take.



    Carcetti moves on to becoming the new mayor, a goal no one can be certain if it's possible.



    Colvin takes all the hits he has to take and is still standing up, nevertheless convinced he has done the right thing.



    Daniels and Pearlman are united for good, as Daniels gets unexpected promotion and becomes independent from his wife.



    The gap between the partners Herc and Carver become more obvious than ever, as Herc welcomes the return of "traditional" police work of busting corners, while Carver seems to really have heard Colvin's speech about real policework and is trying to move on.



    Avon is crushed by all the events and seems to loose some of his confidence that has kept him during all these years, as he now is not only alone, but even has to face his real defeat, when Marlo walks in on his trial.



    Omar, like McNulty, seems to have found some kind of closure by killing Stringer, but one can only guess what he will be up to next.



    And McNulty? Well, as usual, he surprises us, twice in fact, first by again changing his job to what he thinks is the right thing to do (being a real policeman like he used to be) and second by visiting Beatrice, which not only makes for one of the most surprising moments in the whole show but also for an unbelievably strong and emotional scene that only works because of the 36 episodes that preceded it.



    There's even more, so much more that it seems strange, even in memory, that so much can happen in 60 minutes. Season 3 was a brilliant and genius as the previous two seasons and the only reason that I'm not really in tears right now, is the fact that I know that season 4 is starting this year, giving me hope that the best-written serial fiction I have ever experienced will go on.moreless
  • All's well that ends well- and The Wire really knows how to end a season well.

    9.7
    As close to perfect as a season-ender gets, this one hits all of the marks. Story arcs are closed satisfactorily, but some ends are purposely left dangling. Hints are dropped of a new direction in Season 4 for several characters. Fond farewells are bid to some characters, while others are brought back for another turn on stage. And most importantly, the crisp writing, note-perfect acting by the talented ensemble and peerless direction leave you wanting more. This season was incredible, and indelible.

    The bar is set very high indeed for the next season. But I am sure this series is up to the challenge.moreless
Wendell Pierce

Wendell Pierce

Bunk Moreland

Wood Harris

Wood Harris

Avon Barksdale

John Doman

John Doman

Bill Rawls

Robert Wisdom

Robert Wisdom

Bunny Colvin (Episodes 26-, recurring previously)

Lance Reddick

Lance Reddick

Cedric Daniels

Deirdre Lovejoy

Deirdre Lovejoy

Ronnie Pearlman

Paul Majors

Paul Majors

Off. MacGaul (uncredited)

Guest Star

Marty Lodge

Marty Lodge

 

Guest Star

Reid Sasser

Reid Sasser

 

Guest Star

Chad L. Coleman

Chad L. Coleman

Cutty Wise

Recurring Role

Richard DeAngelis

Richard DeAngelis

Ray Foerster

Recurring Role

Michael Potts

Michael Potts

Brother Mouzone

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (1)

    • In the beginning of the episode, right after Bunk Moreland picks up a shotgun shell at the crime scene, Stringer Bell's chest can be clearly seen, moving up and down, although he should be dead.

  • QUOTES (4)

    • Slim Charles: It's what war is you know? Once you in it, you in it. If it's a lie, then we fight on that lie but we got to fight.

    • Witness: I saw only the one of them. He was black, big I thought. With a large weapon.
      Bunk: BNBG.
      Det. Vernon Holley: (laughing) Big Negro, Big Gun.

    • (referring to a now deceased Stringer)
      McNulty: I caught him, Bunk. On the wire. I caught him. He doesn't fuckin' know it.

    • Squeek: You've got to be the stupidest motherfucker... I've ever dated.
      Bernard: (to crony) I can't wait to get to prison.

  • NOTES (1)

    • Music: "Ride of the Valkyries" by Richard Wagner; "Fast Train" by Solomon Burke; "Drop It Like It's Hot" by Snoop Dogg ft. Pharrell

  • ALLUSIONS (2)

    • Apocalypse Now
      The use of the composition "Ride of the Valkyries" by Col. Bill Rawls when the raids are made is a direct reference to the 1979 Vietnam war film Apocalypse Now, directed by Francis Ford Coppolla. Robert Duvall's character, who is also named Bill and a Colonel, blasts the song from air cavalry helicopters as they attack a Viet Cong village.

    • One of the books that McNulty pulls down from Stringer Bell's book shelf is Adam Smith's An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, published on March 9, 1776. It is widely considered to be the first modern work in the field of economics. The work also being the first comprehensive defense of free market policies.

More
Less