The X-Files

Season 9 Episode 12

Underneath

0
Aired Sunday 9:00 PM Mar 31, 2002 on FOX
7.5
out of 10
User Rating
181 votes
8

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

EDIT
Scully, Doggett and Reyes investigate an old case that Doggett worked on as a cop in Brooklyn, dubbed "The Screwdriver Killer". They try to determine whether the man who was convicted and has just been released from prison was actually the man responsible for the murders.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Underneath

    10
    Underneath was a perfect episode of The X-Files. I really enjoyed watching because the story was well written, there were some scary moments and there was some character development for Doggett. It was interesting to see the original case in the beginning and then to see more horrific developments after Fain was released from prison. I loved how Doggett didn't want to believe or make the case an X-File. There were many great scenes and some truly creepy moments. I liked the ending and look forward to watching what happens next!!!!!!!!!moreless
  • Be Afraid, Be Very Afraid...

    5.0
    There are six words that should make any self-respecting fan of the X-Files run screaming into the night. Those words are "Written and Directed by John Shiban."



    You know the series is over when Shiban, the writer who brought us a rectum-diving Oompa Loompa in last season's "Badlaa," is finally allowed to actually direct an episode. So pour yourself a particularly stiff drink and get into a Mystery Science Theater 3000 mode...



    It starts out well enough, with a sinister house-call by a cable guy one dark and stormy night that results in a houseful of blood and a pissed-looking Doggett answering the call in his New York blue. But things eventually go painfully, dreadfully wrong.



    The worst part of this episode is the manner in which the split-personality premise is completely and totally misused. If bearded-man is simply the alter-ego of our altar-boy protagonist, then how the heck does he beat up on himself? And just how does bearded-man manage to stab the assistant DA in the back of his neck with a screwdriver while altar-boy is talking to him? I know, John, writing is hard, everyone expects so much of you, like logic and continuity and other big words. It's so unfair.



    Then we have the HUGE tunnel system that lies beneath a rather humble looking cable-access panel, a panel that appears to measure less than a foot across but through which everyone nimbly descends. Holy Alice in Wonderland! Who knew my cable company had twelve foot high tunnels with running water just so that I could enjoy my MTV and CNN? Eventually it appears that the entire neighborhood ends up down in these tunnels as our agents manage to capture our killer, "Third Man" style. Even his former defense lawyer shows up down in the smelly, dark tunnel! LOL! As if...moreless
  • Ah, good ol' Monster of the Week.

    7.7
    I'm a bit perplexed as to why all the preceding reviewers hate this episode so much. Yes, there were plot holes (I'm pretty sure tunnels twenty feet underground don't have giant windows looking out on foliage and moonlight, for example), but overall it was a classic MotW X-File.



    As usual, Patrick acts his little pointy-eared heart out (although I don't think the "you don't clock out!" line was good enough to warrant using it twice, Shiban, but okay), while Gish is...there too. Scully is skeptical in this one, in case you're keeping score, and relies on science instead of aliens to tell her what's going on.



    As to one of the "plot holes" cited in previous reviews - the impossibility of Gentle Bob watching Psycho Bob stab the ADA guy in the back of the neck when they're the same person and Gentle Bob is in front of ADA guy - you guys, Gentle Bob is NUTS. I see no reason why he wouldn't hallucinate Psycho Bob stabbing the guy when he's really the one doing it. Because he's NUTS. That's what crazy people do. They make stuff up. Plot hole explained.



    Some reviewers have complained about Doggett's reaction to seeing Psycho Bob get shot and then turning into Gentle Bob, but I think his continued skepticism and attempt to explain it away due to lack of sleep is perfectly acceptable and Doggett-y. Scully did the same thing for seven years after repeated exposure to stuff way weirder than that; can't we cut Doggett a little slack in getting aboard the paranormal train? After all, he's just a simple flatfoot!



    All in all, a good old-fashioned Monster of the Week episode.moreless
  • Not a great episode.

    4.5
    I didn\'t like the episode, there was nothing that caught me like other episodes and if it weren\'t that I have the need to watch every episode, I probably would\'ve turned it off. There was nothing too great or inticing about his episode and it was very bland. *SPOLIER* and how if it was the same person would you figure he could be looking at the DA while he\'s behind him stabbing him in the back??? Exactly, it made no sense, it wasn't a great story and luckily I\'ll probably forget all about this episode.moreless
  • A gratifying return to character for Doggett.

    7.0
    This is the first time that Doggett has really felt like the John Doggett we first met, for this entire season so far. The attitude, the beliefs, the internal struggle when faced with the unbelievable. Given how poor this season has been overall, this was a very welcome return.



    The story was an interesting one though I think it would have been more believable to bring in a unborn sibling or something, the double appearing out of thin air was a bit much but it certainly isn't enough to put me off. An enjoyable episode and a very interesting look into Doggett's past as a cop.moreless
Robert Patrick

Robert Patrick

Special Agent John Doggett

Gillian Anderson (I)

Gillian Anderson (I)

Special Agent Dana Scully

Mitch Pileggi

Mitch Pileggi

Assistant Director Walter Skinner

Annabeth Gish

Annabeth Gish

Special Agent Monica Reyes

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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