The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles

Season 1 Episode 3

Loves Sweet Song, London, May 1916

1
Aired Sunday 8:00 PM Mar 11, 1992 on ABC
9.5
out of 10
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22 votes
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Episode Summary

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Loves Sweet Song, London, May 1916
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In England Indy gets into trouble when his love affair with a strong-willed young woman is derailed by her fervent belief in the women's suffrage movement and her need for independence.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Falling for a beautiful woman Indy becomes involved in a fight for female rights!

    10
    What a classic story! As the second part of what would later be the TV movie 'Love's Sweet Song' this is without a doubt the better segment than the slightly confused 'Ireland, April 1916'. For those who are interested 'London, May 1916' was shown much earlier than the Ireland episode as the third aired episode of Season 1.



    Having travelled to London to enlist in the Belgium army Indy becomes involved with a strong willed female bus conductor who has joined a movement to get women independence in factory work. Realising both their similarities and differences make them a couple nothing could possibly tear them apart until Indy finally gets that call to service. The call to service from which he may never return Once in a while you get an episode of a TV series that surpasses anything that's come before and will come later. You get a perfect story that successfully balances all the key elements of the series while offering something original. It doesn't occur often but here it does. Everyone who's seen or knows 'The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles' remembers this episode. They either remember it for Liz Hurley putting in a beautiful performance or for it's ultimately sad romantic plot set against the backdrop of wartime London. In nearly all episodes of the series not all the elements work that well together. It's common for one element to shine like the acting, location work, etc. The previous story set in Ireland has some nice location work but was mostly saved by its action packed conclusion. With 'London, May 1916' every element that makes up an episode of the series is strong. The writer balances everything so one thing isn't greater than the other. Now to talk about the story. Successfully travelling to London to enlist in the Belgium army Indy must lie to get a placement. It all leads to a rather amusing scene where Indy's application doesn't quite hold up but the recruiter is impressed enough anyway. Remy in his infinite wisdom has been teaching Indy about love, teaching the poor guy to stalk widows. It's after an incident on a bus involving one of the said widows that Indy encounters bus conductor Vicky Prentiss played by Elizabeth Hurley, showing better acting and more charisma in her early career than anything she's done after this. Now, as bus conductor Vicky runs a tight operation. There's none of this tiresome trouble where the bus stops for ten minutes every five minutes in order to "help regulate the service" rubbish. Nope. Whether it's raining or pouring bombs Vicky makes sure the bus gets to the end of its journey. As a person who's lived in London all my life I'm telling you that's excellent bus conducting! We can only hope people at Travel For London one day watch this episode. Vicky meeting Indy also leads to probably the most OTT line the series ever did. While on the top deck Indy sees in amazement a zeppelin hovering above about to drop bombs. Our young hero's never seen anything like this so he asks what it is. Sure, Vicky's being sarcastic but when she says "it's a time traveller from the 21st century come to see if you're alright" this reviewer had to rewind the DVD in order to make sure he hadn't gone crazy. It's a line that within the context of watching a period series immediately makes you say "excuse me, what did you just say?" It's also a line you wouldn't expect and probably you'll never hear Liz Hurley utter again in her career. It seems Vicky has joined a movement for women's suffrage lead by Sylvia Pankhurst, which puts her at odds with Mrs Seymour when our young couple visit her in Oxford. Yes, we get to see Mrs Seymour again and surprisingly Margaret Tyzack's onscreen friendship with Flanery's Indy works just as well as it did with Carrier. The acting by everyone is terrific and you hope it is since Hurley and Flanery have to show they have chemistry. It's the innocent love plot that drives the story forward as Indy and Vicky look out for each other. There is a real bond that comes through more than in other Young Indy based stories. Vanessa Redgrave also puts in an appearance as Vicky's mother and in just a short scene displays the experience, regret and sadness of someone who was treated like an animal for wanting equality. It's a powerful scene showing what could happen to Vicky.



    There are so many great moments and scenes contained within its forty-five minutes. Whether it's them sparring in different languages, Vicky's outrage with Winston Churchill during a special dinner or a montage scene of romance that feels more sincere than anything romantic George Lucas later tried to do in 'Attack of the Clones' nothing 'London, May 1916' does fails to impress. The location work and visual effects that are used to bring wartime London and Oxford to life are breathtaking. I'm seeing a beautiful period recreation of the city where I grew up. So to sum up why is this such a good story? Romances very rarely work that well onscreen but it does in this episode. We have a truthful, sweeping tale of love that pulls at the heartstrings and makes us remember why we're human. It makes the end all the more tear dropping as Indy is called to fight in the war. Vicky doesn't want to be tied down into a relationship that may not continue. As he leaves the train station they both exchange looks as though they know they will never see each other again.



    That is until you see the original ending. The original bookend had the ninety-three year old Indy played by George Hall finally reunite with Vicky. It's unnecessary, an afterthought and what stays in our minds is the re-edited ending with Indy disappearing to war in a cloud of steam. A symbolic end to a tale of a lost relationship. But also a well acted, well directed ending for a classic piece of television.moreless
Corey Carrier

Corey Carrier

Young Henry "Indiana" Jones, Jr. at age 8-10

Sean Patrick Flanery

Sean Patrick Flanery

Young Henry "Indiana" Jones, Jr. at age 16-20

George Hall

George Hall

Dr. Henry “Indiana” Jones, Jr. at age 93

Margaret Tyzack

Margaret Tyzack

Helen Seymour

Guest Star

Elizabeth Hurley

Elizabeth Hurley

Vicky Prentiss

Guest Star

Jane Wyatt

Jane Wyatt

older Vicky Prentiss

Guest Star

Ronny Coutteure

Ronny Coutteure

Remy Baudouin

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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  • TRIVIA (2)

    • Non-fiction characters appearing in this episode:

      Sylvia Pankhurst: One of the principal campaigners for the suffragettes, the more radical and militant members of the late-19th and early-20th century movement for women's suffrage (right to vote) in the United Kingdom. She later was a prominent fighter against fascism and for peace(1882-1960)

      Winston Churchill: Best known for his time during World War II as the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. Prior to the time of this episode (May, 1916), Churchill had served as First Lord of the Admiralty until the debacle at Gallipoli. In November, 1915, he commanded the Royal Scots Fusiliers in France as a Colonel before returning to England in March, 1916. He was known for being instrumental in the development of new technologies like air power, tanks, and other modernizations. (1874-1965)

    • This episode gives a hint to the extent of Indy's skills with languages. Based on his interaction with Vicky, he seems to be fluent in French, German, Italian, Hungarian, Swedish, Greek (Ancient and Modern), and Arabic. He also spoke Swahili from his experiences there as a child.

  • QUOTES (0)

  • NOTES (3)

    • The end of this episode shows Old Indy played by George Hall and an older Vicky Prentiss reuniting. When the show was re-edited the Old Indy bookends were taken out, therefore we are never shown their reunion in TV movie Love's Sweet Song.

    • This episode is included on Volume 1 Disc 10 of the DVD collection. The companion documentaries are on Disc 11, and they include:
      -Easter Rising - The Poets' Rebellion
      -The Passions of William Butler Yeats
      -Sean O'Casey vs. Ireland
      -Ireland - The Power of the Poets
      -Winston Churchill - The Lion's Roar
      -Demanding the Vote - The Pankhursts and British Suffrage
      -Fighting for the Vote - Women's Suffrage in America

    • Part 2 of the video Love's Sweet Song with Ireland, April 1916.

  • ALLUSIONS (0)

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