Tic Tac Dough

Follow
(ended 1991)

USER EDITOR

No Editor

User Score: 0

7.1
out of 10
User Rating
28 votes
1

SHOW REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Tic Tac Dough

Show Summary

Tic Tac Dough is a classic game show that married a straight Q&A quiz with the game of tic-tac-toe. Each version—from the 1950s scandal-plagued version, the successful 1978-86 version and the 1990 ill-advised remake—is covered here. While each version of this Jack Barry and Dan Enright creation had unique elements about them, the gameplay of each version of Tic Tac Dough was essentially identical. Two contestants, including a returning champion (who was "X"), competed. Rules — all versions The host introduced nine categories, and each player alternated selecting boxes on the board. The host read a question, and if the player answered correctly, he/she got to place their symbol in the box and the cash value of the box (which changed depending on the version) was added to a pot. If incorrect, the box was left empty and their opponent could earn their mark there with a correct question. The categories rotated to different boxes after each player is asked a question. The center box always featured a two-part question (or sometimes, a question with two answers); it was worth more than the outside boxes and thus considered "more difficult." The player selecting that box had to answer both parts correctly to earn the box. If there was a tie game, nine new categories were introduced, and the cash pot kept accumulating. Even in the original 1950s version, the pot sometimes reached $10,000 and higher through repeated tie games. The first player to earn three of his mark in a row won the cash value of the pot and became champion. 1956-1959 version In the 1956-1959 version (whose eight outside boxes were worth $100 and the center box $200), there was no bonus game; he/she simply faced another challenger until defeated. The original version (which, at its peak also had a prime-time version) was cancelled in the fall of 1959, a casualty of the Quiz Show Scandals. 1978-1986 version Tic Tac Dough returned in the summer of 1978 as a daytime entry on CBS. Wink Martindale was the host, and the boxes were worth $200 (for the outside) and $300 (for the center). The categories did not "shuffle," and there was no tie games; instead, if both players had four of their mark after eight questions, one final "tie-breaking" question was asked, and the first to answer correctly won the game. The champion then played a bonus game. Here, he/she faced the board of nine squares, which concealed four X's and four O's (arranged to make just one "Tic Tac Dough"), plus the dragon. The player won $150 for each symbol uncovered; he/she could stop at any time, while finding the "Tic Tac Dough" awarded any cash found (amended to $1,000 if they didn't have that much) plus a prize package. Finding the dragon, however, ended the game and forfeited both the cash and prizes. Tic Tac Dough was a much bigger success, as a five-a-week syndicated series. Once again, the questions rotated after each player has been asked one question (later, they shuffled after each question), and the cash values of the box remained $200 and $300, as appropriate. The bonus game was revamped wherein the board hid six cash amounts, a "TIC" and a "TAC" and (of course) that evil dragon (and his earth-shattering roar!). The contestant picked numbers, one at a time, and earned whatever cash amount s/he found ($100, $150, $250, $300, $400 and $500) and added it to the pot. If the player reached $1,000 or more, or uncovered both "TIC" and "TAC," s/he won the cash and a prize package. Once again, uncovering Mr. Dragon ended the bonus round with nothing. Five-time champions won a new car, as thus: • 1978 – Buick Skylark. • 1979-1981 – Buick Century. • 1981-1984 – Chevrolet Chevette. • 1984-1985 – AMC Eagle. • 1985-1986 – Madza GLC. In addition to the regular categories, special red boxed categories were added to the game during the show's run; at first one per game, there were three by the 1982-1983 season. These boxes each had special rules, many of them which involved both players and could affect the game's outcome at that moment. Often, a player could earn two boxes in a single turn (or sometimes, even get a "Tic Tac Dough" without his/her opponent getting a chance). The red box categories, plus long-running champions (who all competed until their defeat) made this version a big success. The best-known long-running champion was Thom McKee, who won $312,700 in his 43-game run in 1980. In the ranks of game shows, only Ken Jennings, the Jeopardy! mega-champion of 2004, has won more games. Also, through multiple games, the cash pot often climbed above $10,000 (the record single-game jackpot was $36,900, reportedly during McKee's championship reign, courtesy of the Secret Category; a red box where a correct answer doubled the pot). Martindale hosted the show until 1985. He was replaced by Jim Caldwell for the 1985-1986 season (which featured a redesigned set). The show's final episode, which aired in May 1986, featured a tribute to McKee. 1990 revival Not even McKee could have saved Tic Tac Dough's 1990 syndicated revival, in many critics' opinions. Game play was similar to the 1978 syndicated version, except the player in control used a plunger to stop the categories from shuffling. The boxes were worth $500 (outside) and $1,000 (center), but the jackpot reset after a tie game and the box values increased ($1,000 and $2,000, and so on…). The bonus game was similar to the 1978 CBS version, except the player chose one mark at the outset to try to get a "Tic Tac Dough" (there were four of the selected mark, the only one that could provide a three-in-a-row; and three of the other mark). The first "X" or "O" found was worth $500 & the next "X" or "O" doubled the pot, so the best possible score would be $8,000 (4 symbols + Dragon Slayer. Finding the "Tic-Tac-Dough" or a Dragon Slayer (an automatic win space & doubled the winnings) won a prize package, while finding the dragon ended the game with nothing. No cars were awarded this time, and champions stayed on for up to 15 shows. The 1990 version (whose only saving grace was music composed by the great Henry Mancini; his final television theme song) was harshly criticized largely for emcee Patrick Wayne's hosting style and the hampered game play because of other rules revisions (not worth mentioning here). And you had a "rapping Dragon" & "rapping dragon slayer" as well. It didn't help to have special theme weeks, such as the much ballyhooed "Divorced Couples Week." Viewers apparently agreed, and this version died a quick death. There is no editor for this show. If you would like to be the editor look here for details.

moreless
Bill Wendell

Bill Wendell

Announcer (1956-1958)

Art James

Art James

Announcer (1981-1986, 1990)

Gene Rayburn

Gene Rayburn

Daytime Host (1956-1958)

Jay Jackson

Jay Jackson

Evening Host (1957))

Johnny Olson

Johnny Olson

Temporary Announcer (1959)

Jay Stewart

Jay Stewart

Announcer (1978-1980)

Saturday
No results found.
Sunday
No results found.
Monday
No results found.
SUBMIT REVIEW
  • A tic tac toe type game with a jeopardy type question and answer to win the square. The contestants have to choose a space on the board and answer questions while avoiding a electronic dragon and losing a turn if they find him. Points and prizes awmoreless

    7.0
    A good mix of anticipation thrown into this like the daily double for jeopardy waiting for the dragon to rear his ugly head turn the tide of this classic game.



    Wink martindale was an excellent host.

    Very personable and up beat.



    Of course the bigger games shows gave away better prizes but it was a neat half hour whe I was a kid

No one has discussed Tic Tac Dough yet. Start a conversation!

More
Less

More Info About This Show

Categories

Game Show