Time Team

Season 10 Episode 4

Fetlar, Shetland

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Aired Sunday 5:45 PM Jan 26, 2003 on Channel 4
7.8
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Episode Summary

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Fetlar, Shetland
AIRED:
The Giant's Grave. After discovering pieces of Viking soapstone vessels in their vegetable patch, Nick and Lynn Boxall, owners of Fetlar General Stores, thought it might be worth calling in Time Team. As well as being attracted by the possibility of finding a Viking settlement, the Team was also intrigued by some of Fetlar's fascinating earthworks and rocky outcrops.moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
    Jo Leigh

    Jo Leigh

    Geophysicist

    Guest Star

    David Thorpe (II)

    David Thorpe (II)

    Field Archaeologist

    Guest Star

    Sophie Jackson

    Sophie Jackson

    Field Archaeologist

    Guest Star

    Raysan Shakir Al-Kubaisi

    Raysan Shakir Al-Kubaisi

    Graphical Artist

    Recurring Role

    Neil Emmanuel

    Neil Emmanuel

    Graphical Artist

    Recurring Role

    Henry Chapman

    Henry Chapman

    Archaeological Surveyor

    Recurring Role

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

    FILTER BY TYPE

    • TRIVIA (0)

    • QUOTES (4)

      • Tony: You don't mind us extending your trenches and spoiling your beautiful garden?
        Nick: (looking at the bare ground with a lone swing set) No I don't think so at all, I think it would be fine to get it cleared up in a lot of ways. It would be splendid to think that there might be something here that you could find.
        Tony: We've taken Nick at his word, we're going to destroy his garden, so out go the children's toys and the climbing frame, and in comes the big orange trowel.

      • Mick: Have you got me a boat burial yet then? Doesn't look like it; it looks like a pile of stones.
        Magnar: That's what we've come down on so far, masses of stones.
        Mick: Do they put great cairns of boulders over the top of Viking ship burials?
        Magnar: No, I've never heard about that before but then again there is only a few boat graves that have been excavated so this could be the first.
        Mick: Right, right.
        Phil: You sound as if you want to right it off just like that
        Mick: Well it doesn't look like I expected, it just looks more like a cairn.

      • Tony: I want to find out if their bloodthirsty reputation is entirely deserved.
        Colleen: Well, it depends on your perspective. If you were a monk and you were being attacked quite frequently by the Vikings as indeed it sems to have been the case, then yes, but of course it is 9th Century, 8th-9th Century there was a lot of people moving around attacking other people, it's not just Vikings.
        Tony: So everyone was as bad as each other.
        Colleen: Yes, in some ways
        Tony: Isn't this all a bit speculative? Do we know anything tangible about what was going on?
        Mick: There are written records of it, the Orkneyinga Saga for example which is about Orkney a little further south, has a story about a chap called Harald Fairhair, I think it is..
        Colleen: Yes
        Mick: He goes off raiding twice a year, almost like people who go on package holiday. So he does his spring agriculture work then he goes off on the raid, then he comes back and gets his crops in and then he goes off on another raid.

      • Tony: Three days ago you asked us two questions; you asked us if there had ever been a Viking house in your back garden and the answer is a categorical yes, and you also asked us whether or not the Giant's Grave was actually a Viking boat burial once again the answer is yes.

    • NOTES (3)

    • ALLUSIONS (1)

      • Orkneyinga Saga

        Written 300 years after the events they relate the Orkneyinga Saga (also called the History of the Earls of Orkney) is a unique historical narrative of the history of the Orkney Islands, Scotland, from their capture by the Norwegian king in the 9th century onwards until about 1200.

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