Time Team

Season 12 Episode 13

Hanslope, Milton Keynes

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Aired Sunday 5:45 PM Apr 03, 2005 on Channel 4
8.6
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Hanslope, Milton Keynes
AIRED:
Animal Farm.
An unusual horse curb bit, carved stonework, a huge quantity of 11th to 13th-century pottery and some high-status finds brought Time Team on a hunt for a Norman house or hunting lodge in this former royal forest. But it wasn't long before the stone walls and foundations, which had originally been thought to support a two-storey building, began to look rather less impressive. Gradually, as the forensic trowels of the diggers went to work, the structure started to shrink in every direction.moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
    Pat Lawrence

    Pat Lawrence

    Local Archaeologist

    Guest Star

    Jonathan Thomas

    Jonathan Thomas

    Local Archaeologist

    Guest Star

    Jonathan Foyle

    Jonathan Foyle

    Architectural Historian

    Guest Star

    Raysan Shakir Al-Kubaisi

    Raysan Shakir Al-Kubaisi

    Graphical Artist

    Recurring Role

    Neil Emmanuel

    Neil Emmanuel

    Graphical Artist

    Recurring Role

    Henry Chapman

    Henry Chapman

    Archaeological Surveyor

    Recurring Role

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

    FILTER BY TYPE

    • TRIVIA (1)

    • QUOTES (4)

      • Helen: The site's starting some time around 1100, we know it's still going sometime around 1200 what about the end?
        Paul: Well round here there's a major medieval pottery industry, at Potterspury which is just three miles down the road. This industry started about 1250, now if you excavate a site dating to the late 13th or 14th century around here you find masses of that pottery and I do mean masses it completely dominates the pottery sherds, but there isn't one single scrap of it on this site.
        Helen: Gosh so it was completely abandoned.
        Paul: It must have been.

      • Tony: Two thirds of the way through day one and we seems to have this extraordinary mismatch, on one hand we've got all those beautiful finds that seem to imply a whole host of buildings but in the ground you can hardly find any archaeology at all. I don't know what's going on, and quite frankly I don't think the archaeologists do either.

      • Tony: Mick I know you think this is a pig of a site, but Jonathan has come up with a fabulous theory that might ease your grumpiness a bit
        Mick: Go on then
        Jonathan: Ok, day one I said it's a mystery site, right so the theory is this, no one actually lives here. It's a pig processing plant.
        Mick: (incredulously) Right.
        Tony: Go on, justify it, given the rubble that you've got in front of you.
        Jonathan: It's very small for a house. It could still be a peasant hovel. But I'm suggesting the pigs are brought in possibly water is heated; scald the pigs you know, de-hair them and then maybe it's some kind of smokehouse. Those weird metal clamps you found might have been for pig's legs.
        Tony: You know when he told me this I thought it was brilliant, but you're the Professor, so?
        Mick: Well, the thing that might help is the Domesday book for this particular manor lists 1000 pigs for the manor, using the woods surrounding for grazing that's a hell of a lot of pigs to have around.

      • Alan: Your Norman Knights rode ponies that were about 12 hands in height.
        Phil: Oh you're laughing they were big warriors, they've got enormous horses.
        Alan: Have a look at this, (producing a facsimile of the Bayeux Tapestry) look where the men's feet are, look how close they are to the ground.
        Phil: Couldn't that just be artistic licence?
        Alan: No because we have excavations of bones from horses, that scaled up would have been 12 or 13 hands, maximum height.
        Phil: Right ok, so maybe this one here.
        Alan: What's your horse's name?
        Boy: Murphy.
        Alan: Hello Murphy.
        Tony: (v.o.) at first sight, Phil thought the bit looked like an instrument of torture, but the Normans seemed to have known what they were doing. Murphy accepts it without fuss.
        Alan: He doesn't seem to be protesting too much.
        Phil: No, I'm amazed.
        Alan: We've prepared your warhorse, Sir Phillip.
        Phil: What? Is that alright? Is it alright for me to ride your horse?
        Boy: Yes
        Tony: Need a hand up?
        Alan: To you Tony, this must seem like a mighty charger.

    • NOTES (3)

    • ALLUSIONS (1)

      • Tony: 800 years ago England was far from a green and pleasant land

        Tony's quote comes from the final stanza of William Blake's Jerusalem

        I will not cease from mental fight,
        Nor shall my sword sleep in my hand,
        Till we have built Jerusalem
        In England's green and pleasant land

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