Time Team

Season 12 Episode 3

Preston, Lancashire

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Aired Sunday 5:45 PM Jan 16, 2005 on Channel 4
8.0
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Episode Summary

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Preston, Lancashire
AIRED:
The Bombers in the Marsh
On 29 November 1944, two Douglas A-26 Invader US bomber planes crashed into Warton Marsh, eight miles from Preston, in Lancashire. Both planes, along with a number of others, had left Warton Airbase in formation, en route to join forces in the preparations for the Battle of the Bulge, which took place from 16 December 1944 to 25 January 1945. Only one minute off the runway and 1,000 feet into the air, the aircraft collided and came to rest in the marsh. All the crew died. Their bodies were recovered from the planes, but an investigation into the causes of the crash was inconclusive.moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
    Ben Urmston

    Ben Urmston

    Geophysicist

    Guest Star

    Tim Allen (III)

    Tim Allen (III)

    Oxford Archaeologist

    Guest Star

    Steve Moss

    Steve Moss

    Air Crash Investigator

    Guest Star

    Raysan Shakir Al-Kubaisi

    Raysan Shakir Al-Kubaisi

    Graphical Artist

    Recurring Role

    Neil Emmanuel

    Neil Emmanuel

    Graphical Artist

    Recurring Role

    Henry Chapman

    Henry Chapman

    Archaeological Surveyor

    Recurring Role

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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    • TRIVIA (0)

    • QUOTES (4)

      • Tony: Where do you want to start, Tim?
        Tim: Well I think we start with the nose, we have the tail sticking out of the ground here, and over there, there's an engine so we'll start with the two bits we know and find the rest by using GeoPhys.
        Tony: How are you going to do it?
        Phil: Get a big digger in Tony, I mean Russell didn't have the advantage of any machinery at all we can work around and make the hole a lot bigger than he could've done. We know from the photographs that all this material built up since 1944 so there's not likely to be much archaeology, if we can strip that off, record it, and then lift it.
        Steve: Gently as you approach the metal please Phil, because y'know I don't want gouges in the evidence.
        Phil: (holding up a hand trowel) Don't worry, don't worry, I've still got this.

      • Tony: We've got a pump at the ready in case we hit water, and the bomb squad in case we hit something more dangerous.

      • Tony: What does all this tell us Steve?
        Steve: Well starting with the broken left wing, it confirms the earlier hypothesis that the other aircraft's wing has rammed into the back of this one, into the rear spar causing the wing to fail, that's why we haven't got it on site. You can really identify an aircraft here in front, over the wing, but when we get back to this area which is sort of the gunner's compartment area, it's a mess.
        Tony: It's all mashed up isn't it? It looks like it's gone through a tumble dryer.
        Steve: I think that's very significant.
        Tony: So do you think that that was hit by the propeller?
        Steve: I think that there is a high probability that it was.

      • Tony: These were experienced pilots, but new planes which were difficult to handle, poor visibility, and bad weather all came together to cause their untimely deaths. After this accident the pilots of the A-26's re-wrote the rules. They changed the way they flew in formation to give themselves a better chance. Never again were two A-26's to collide in the air in more than 30 years of service.

    • NOTES (1)

    • ALLUSIONS (0)