Time Team

Season 8 Episode 7

Salisbury Plain, Wiltshire

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Aired Sunday 5:45 PM Feb 18, 2001 on Channel 4
9.6
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Episode Summary

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Salisbury Plain, Wiltshire
AIRED:
An Iron-Age Roundhouse on Salisbury Plain.

Salisbury Plain - 300 square miles of England on which, the British army trains its soldiers. The area is also rich in archaeology and due to the presence of the army, it's all undisturbed and protected.

The Team are called in to help gather enough evidence to get the site 'scheduled' - legally protected.moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
    John Nicholls

    John Nicholls

    Geophyicist

    Guest Star

    Dr. Roy Entwistle

    Dr. Roy Entwistle

    Local Archaeologist

    Guest Star

    Mark Corney

    Mark Corney

    Roman Landscape Expert

    Guest Star

    Bernard Thomason

    Bernard Thomason

    Archaeological Surveyor

    Recurring Role

    Chris Gaffney

    Chris Gaffney

    Geophysicist

    Recurring Role

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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    • TRIVIA (0)

    • QUOTES (4)

      • Tony: Well it is lunchtime already, and we haven't opened a single trench.

      • Mick: Just looking at it, it looks like we've got round things and rectangular things.
        Roy: Well that's an interesting way of looking at it. It's quite possible these round features belong to the Iron Age and then there is activity dating to the Roman period producing these rectilinear objects.

      • Tony: You've been marching up and down Salisbury plain all day, what have you found?
        John: We've got a great result now, Tony, we actually think this might be a banjo enclosure
        Tony: A what?
        Carenza: A banjo enclosure. They're called banjo enclosures because they look like banjos, but they're incredibly important. They are really high status iron age enclosures, more important than hill forts. They're very uncommon.

      • Ian Barnes: Ironically the army has been here for 103 years now and we have 2,500 monuments. The army have saved the area from being ploughed and built on, but as the army activities got more and more intense and the vehicles got larger it's possible that the tanks can do damage, and of course every time a soldier stops, he wants to dig a hole.

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    • ALLUSIONS (0)

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