Time Team

Season 9 Episode 13

The New Forest, Hampshire

0
Aired Sunday 5:45 PM Mar 31, 2002 on Channel 4
10
out of 10
User Rating
4 votes
0

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

EDIT
The New Forest, Hampshire
AIRED:
Seven Buckets and a Buckle. In the middle of a field, somewhere in Hampshire, is a barrow, or burial mound, now almost flattened by centuries of ploughing. A number of Saxon graves had been identified, probably forming part of a cemetery serving the scattered Dark Age settlements in the area, and the surrounding landscape is full of features dating from pre-Roman times through to the present day. Unfortunately the site has been subject to major activity by unscrupulous metal detectorists. Time Team’s objective, then, to find out as much as possible about the cemetery before the archaeological evidence destroyed. The Team also worked to place the cemetery in its wider context as part of the Anglo-Saxon landscape, looking at how people lived at this time, their beliefs and burial practices, and investigating the trading links that led to a rare and beautiful Byzantine bucket being found in a Hampshire field.moreless

Who was the Episode MVP ?

Tuesday
No results found.
Wednesday
No results found.
Thursday
No results found.
SUBMIT REVIEW
    Helen Geake

    Helen Geake

    Anglo Saxon Expert

    Guest Star

    Steve Bolger

    Steve Bolger

    Metal Detectorist

    Guest Star

    Sally Worrell

    Sally Worrell

    Portable Antiquities Officer

    Guest Star

    Henry Chapman

    Henry Chapman

    Archaeological Surveyor

    Recurring Role

    Christina Ruiz

    Christina Ruiz

    Geophysicist

    Recurring Role

    Maya Gavin

    Maya Gavin

    Graphical Artist

    Recurring Role

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

    FILTER BY TYPE

    • TRIVIA (0)

    • QUOTES (4)

      • Tony: This has got to be the flattest most unprepossessing field we've ever dug on Time Team.
        Mick: What about this big mound in front of us?
        Tony: I see no mound, I see this vague rise.
        Mick: That's a great big round mound in front of us.
        Tony: Well, on this 'big round mound' is this where we found the bucket?

      • Stewart: To a lot of people that's just a mound in a field, to me it's a mound in a landscape that's been evolving for thousands of years. I'm keen to find out why it was there and more importantly the people that are buried there where did they live, I'm using old maps, geological maps, and aerial photographs to try and understand that.

      • Margaret: Don't you think that's incredibly moving? You've got the entire baby's skeleton would have been covered and protected by the two shields. Isn't that amazing?
        Phil: That's right, yeah
        Margaret: There is no question of it being two graves, they went in together, even if one of them was put in days or weeks or months before the other one. With all due respect the burial practice here is really, really odd. I don't understand it.
        Tony: (v.o.) So Phil's double burial appears to have the skeleton of a child or baby placed between the legs of two adult males, unique in any British Saxon cemetery.

      • Tony: By dating the grave goods we can conclude that our cemetery was in operation around 500 AD. By examining the bones and the density of burials that it was an extended family group centred on the mound, and that the people who are buried here, though maybe not warriors held weapons in high regard, but why they are buried in pairs with buckets will for the time being have to remain an enigma.

    • NOTES (4)

    • ALLUSIONS (0)

    More
    Less