Time Team

Season 9 Episode 12

Yaverland, Isle of Wight

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Aired Sunday 5:45 PM Mar 24, 2002 on Channel 4
9.7
out of 10
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Episode Summary

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Yaverland, Isle of Wight
AIRED:
Steptoe et Filius. With a limited excavation, a local archaeologist discovered marble fragments indicating a high-status building. What was actually here on the high ground overlooking what would have been a navigable creek in Roman times?

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SUBMIT REVIEW
    Helen Geake

    Helen Geake

    Anglo-Saxon Expert

    Guest Star

    Ruth Waller

    Ruth Waller

    County Archaeologist

    Guest Star

    Andrew Lacey

    Andrew Lacey

    Bronzesmith

    Guest Star

    Raysan Shakir Al-Kubaisi

    Raysan Shakir Al-Kubaisi

    Graphical Artist

    Recurring Role

    Neil Emmanuel

    Neil Emmanuel

    Graphical Artist

    Recurring Role

    Henry Chapman

    Henry Chapman

    Archaeological Surveyor

    Recurring Role

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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    • TRIVIA (0)

    • QUOTES (4)

      • Tony: The archaeologists want to relocate Kevin's trench because it not only turned up lots of Roman material but also evidence of the earlier Iron Age. They're interested in the transition between the two periods. Personally I'm just hoping we can solve the puzzle of what was going on here in Roman times when the island was known as Vectis.

      • Tony: It's turned out to be quite a good day in the end. We found traces of people living here around the time of the beginning of Roman occupation while just metres away we've got bronze bracelets and potentially a building dating to the end of the Roman period, and because Phil has found Kevin's old trench we're now closer to discovering if it is a Roman villa.

      • Phil: (carefully excavating bronze bracelet) This is what, just twisted wire?
        Mick: I wonder what's going on, that's the third one isn't it?
        Phil: Kevin had one from his evaluation trench there, and ours from yesterday just came in from the bulk over there.
        Tony: (v.o.) All the bracelets are coming from the same context, buried in what Phil calls a lens of material.
        Phil: This material here, this dark stuff, that's where all the bronzes are coming out of, the bracelets, and you can see it's coming back and back and back and it's literally lensing out as you come up the slope. We extended a trench up the hill and we began to run out of finds so we went down and there's blatantly no building. What we thinking now is that perhaps the wall that we thought was the front of the building is in fact the back wall of the building with a cobbled floor, and that it's actually extending down that way.
        Mick: So does that mean we've got to go down that way now?
        Phil: We've got to check it out Mick.

      • Tony: So we've got a huge ditch going in this direction.
        Phil: Well coming right across here in fact the ditch is.
        Tony: And then suddenly somebody has popped a body in it?
        Phil: Into the top, yeah.
        Tony: The burial is so near the surface that it makes me wonder if we've discovered a modern day murder, although there is less topsoil in this part of the field. Carenza, like everyone else is intrigued by the new discovery.
        Carenza: Caroline, did I hear that hands of your burial are up near the head?
        Caroline: At this early stage we're basically finding hand bones, yes, round where the cranium is here.
        Carenza: Is that a bent arm bone there?
        Caroline: This potentially could be yes, a flexed humerus and elbow joint here.
        Carenza: That suggests that it might have been a crouched burial then with the hands held up tightly by the head like this.
        Caroline: That's entirely possible
        Carenza: That would suggest something prehistoric
        Caroline: Well I don't know what Saxon burials usually look like but
        Carenza: Well they're usually lying on their back with the hands up on the chest or down near the waist, not crouched up like that, that's more likely to be prehistoric.

    • NOTES (3)

    • ALLUSIONS (0)

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