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  • Avatar of telvisnostic

    telvisnostic

    [1]Oct 10, 2008
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    Matt Morgan recently sat down for an in-depth interview with the Miami Herald. You can check out the full interview at this link. Here are the highlights:

    On first getting into the gym: "I put on 30 pounds of mass that summer, but I got addicted to getting bigger and busted my %$# in that weight room, loving it. With weights, it's very simple. The more you lift, the bigger you get. You can see the progress in the mirror when you're working out, and I loved that. [...] I was a stringbean as a kid growing up."

    Getting in to wrestling: "I just loved watching pro wrestling my entire life -- loved it, loved it, loved it, and everybody on the team used to call me Big Daddy Cool like Kevin Nash [who ironically played college basketball, too]. I think it's ironic I work with him now in TNA because he was one of my favorite wrestlers growing up -- him and Undertaker. I loved Nash's cool persona."

    Meeting with WWE: "I saw Vince McMahon lifting in the gym. I went up to him, told him how much I respected him and how I loved the show and then asked him what do I do to get started in this business. He looked at my friend who wrote for WWE magazine and said "Where did you find this big guy? He's huge." He asked me how big I was, how tall I was and where I went to school. I told him what was going on, and he goes you should really do your family justice and try out [basketball or football]. He couldn't guarantee me a job. At that point, Ohio Valley Wrestling was really sizzling with John Cena, Batista, Brock Lesnar. They had a lot of talent. I said, 'Sir, with all due respect, I'll drive anywhere I have to, to do any developmental you need me to do. I want to learn how to wrestle the right way. 'Tom Prichard really went to bat for me, he said to wait a little bit, and they'll figure it out.'' While waiting, Morgan worked at Enterprise Rent-A-Car."

    His MTV/WWE Tough Enough audition: "I sent a tape of me lifting in the gym, dunking a basketball and doing all the athletic things I can do and cut a promo of why I'm not some fat slop sitting on the couch who watched Tough Enough I, eating Doritos, saying, 'I can do that. I am a guy who loves wrestling. I loved wrestling. Even if it wasn't cool to like wrestling, I still liked it. Even the five years of funk, when it wasn't cool to like pro wrestling because it was still in the transition from cartoon to attitude era, I still loved it. I still watched it. I hosted Monday Night Raw and Monday Nitro parties in my dorm with my basketball teammates and football players. I'm a lifelong fan."

    Will wrestling be cool again?: "It will take another big wave for that to happen again. There's another wave that still has to hit. I'm not saying this because I work here, but I think TNA is on that course to do something different, and that's what it's going to take to get those college kids to have pizza and kegs in their dormitory again, watching Spike TV on Thursday nights, because they're going to see somebody do something or act something they've never seen before. For me, it was the whole nWo thing. Thinking 'Wow, this is real. That part's real. Maybe that's not, but this is real.' Anytime you have that, and you can't tell what's real and what's not, that's awesome. That draws anybody. My mom was even interested during that whole [WCW/nWo] thing. It's funny how it comes full circle. Now I work in a company with [the nWo's] Kevin Nash, and he gives me a crapload of advice each day. I talk to him on the phone. He helps me backstage."

    On his first match ever, which was actually against AJ ****: "God, that's got to be the worst situation [for AJ] ever to be in -- not just to get into a ring with just a big muscled, jacked-up kid, but a big muscled, jacked-up kid who's never wrestled in his life, except to be on Tough Enough for two weeks. I could chain wrestle and bump and things like that, but I had no business powerbombing him and chokeslamming him. On the outside of the ring, he had turned his back, and I was in the ring, and he wanted me to reach over the top rope and grab him around his neck and pull him up into the ring and put him on his back, like a Baldo Bomb. I was like, 'Oh my God. He's really letting me do this to him.' I was so thankful to him after the match. It came across as I looked like a freak of nature, and that's a lot of skill on his part. During that match, I'm thinking, 'Oh my God, that had to hurt.' I'm [whispering], 'Are you OK?' A.J.'s [whispering], 'Shut up man. I'm fine. Quit asking me."


    -wrestlezone.com

    Edited on 12/26/2011 1:42pm
    Edited 2 total times.
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  • Avatar of telvisnostic

    telvisnostic

    [4]Nov 5, 2008
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    Wrestling revealed wrote:
    Jim Cornette compares James Storm & Robert Roode to a legendary 80s tag team.

    http://wrestlingrevealed.com/articles/0811/jim-cornette-compares-beer-money.php

    He does mak esome good points. The old school heel of Roode meshes will with the tag team master of James Storm.

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    telvisnostic

    [7]Feb 26, 2009
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    Mick Foley recently conducted an interview with Slam! Wrestling and discussed quite a bit, including twists and turns that the fans should look out for in upcoming months, him training for the Lockdown PPV TNA critics, and much more. The following are excerpts from the interview. To read the article in its entirety, click HERE.

    On twists and turns in the MEM/Frontline angle:

    "I think the feud has given a lot of focus to the show. We haven't seen anybody jump sides, and depending on who does, it could be even more interesting. (It could) shake things up in a big way. Who knows? It might be me."Â

    On the timing of his first match back in the ring:

    "Clearly it wasn't the biggest match I could have been in, but I think it may have been the right time. It's unlike (my last stint in WWE) in that now, it's not going to be one match every couple of years; it'll be a few matches a year. You don't want your jumping off point to be the absolute zenith of your time there."

    On TNA's critics:

    "Some people have a love-hate relationship with TNA like they really want it to work but sometimes they get frustrated when things don't seem to go the way they like it. (To those people, I say) just have patience. Some weeks we're going to hit the bullseye, sometimes we're going to miss the target completely. But overall, a year from now, I think people will think that the company has made great strides."

    On training for a match return at Lockdown:

    "I am training and gearing up as if I might have to do something at that show. I'll leave it at that, for people to wonder about."

    -wrestlezone

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  • Avatar of telvisnostic

    telvisnostic

    [8]Mar 9, 2009
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    PWinsider wrote:

    Booker T was interviewed by the Miami Herald today to discuss the PPV and his Legends of Wrestling Fanfest over Wrestlemania weekend in Houston, Texas. It's a long piece and well worth reading. Booker noted that Ring of Honor could have blocked him from running his convention as they had right of first refusal since both events are in the same facility but didn't, so he's offered to make an appearance on their show as a thank you. He said that his role in TNA is to help younger talents find themselves and also noted that he and his brother, former WCW wrestler Stevie Ray have personal issues that preclude them from having a relationship right now.

    When asked about talent suddenly being booked by WWE to appear at Wrestlemania festivities after they took the Booker convention, he commented, "Ron Simmons is still within his 90 days, and they told him he can't do it,. Torrie Wilson is involved in a match at WrestleMania, so they thought it was a conflict of interest. I don't know how. Nick Bockwinkel hasn't had anything with WWE for quite some time, and all of a sudden he's doing something. Tito Santana has pulled out as well. 'I was surprised more than anything because it is for charity. I don't think that PWA is riding the coattails of WWE. This is the city of Houston. A city I've grown up in. I really think we're taking the high road on this. We're not trying to bash anybody or beat anybody up. Hopefully, we'll get a donation from WWE for our foundation. Hopefully, they will give money to the foundation and try to do damage control.''

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    telvisnostic

    [10]Apr 16, 2009
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    Jeff Jarrett recently conducted a rare interview with Alfonso Castillo located HERE. Jarrett discusses a ton during the course of the interview and the following are a few excerpts:

    On whether he's happy with TNA's ratings:

    You can look at it from a number of factors. You look at where we've come. We've gone from a .7, .8 to a 1.3 on Spike network. You can look at ECW. They started in the high 2's, and now they're in the 1.2, 1.3 range – a tremendous drop. Smackdown you can't really count because they've changed networks. They've had their issues, but as a matter of fact, they've done extremely well. You look at Raw. They went, over the last three or four years, they went from the 4's to the 3's, and now they're back up there. So it's an ebb and flow. And they tout themselves as the longest running series. It's phenomenon that from 1993 to 2009, they've been on 17 years. They've got a 14-year, 15-year head start on us.

    So am I satisfied? Absolutely, I'm very satisfied. Talk to the network heads at Spike TV and ask them. Am I happy? As a businessman, we've got to keep growing. We've got to keep growing the product internationally, domestically. We've got to keep hitting on all cylinders. So I think that's maybe a two-sided question. I hope I'm articulating myself right.

    On whether it was hard to put the focus on himself with the release of his DVD:

    Without question. Alfonso, I am elated that you asked the question, because now I can tell the story. This DVD has been on the books for, I want to say, a minimum of two years, maybe three. I've always wanted to put it off, cancel it, put other guys in front, put other series in front, put another pay per view in front – I've always found a way to push it off, and push it off and push it off. And then, through the sickness of my wife, I was off television, so obviously, and with the passing of her, there was no reason to put one out. And now I've been back since the end of last summer. I've been back seven or eight or nine months.

    We've hired a new marketing team and we've got a new VP of marketing and a new CMO – chief marketing officer – we've got a lot of new people in our marketing department. And quite frankly, they came to me and said, "Jeff, now is the perfect time. We're doing it. We really need to do this." And I looked at it and I said, "I agree with you. Let's do it. Let's make it really special and let's make it an in-depth look, because nothing has ever been done like this on me before." So I think the hard work is going to pay off.

    On his relationship with Vince McMahon:

    I'll say there's a personal relationship with the entire McMahon family and Jeff Jarrett. As far as a working relationship – absolutely not. We're competitors. But a personal relationship? Without a doubt. The entire McMahon family was very, very good to me during the passing of my wife, and that's something I'll never forget.

    -Wrestlezone

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  • Avatar of telvisnostic

    telvisnostic

    [11]Apr 18, 2009
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    The following is an excerpt from an interview-article with Kevin Nash from Kevin Eck's Baltimore Sun blog page:

    On the staph infection in his elbow: "It looked like a gunshot wound even a month ago. It just looked the thing was never going to heal. We have a young surgeon that helps us at TNA, and about a month ago at TV he said, 'I can close that.' A week ago Thursday he surgically went in and put the thing back together. I won't be a hundred percent, but I'm definitely wrestling on Sunday."

    On the Main Event Mafia clicking with viewers: "Whether it's The Horsemen, the nWo, the Main Event Mafia or DeGeneration X, it always seems like a faction, especially a heel faction, seems to work. The problems the babyfaces always have is that they're always fighting amongst themselves, and you get four or five guys that have a common goal to be the deterrent to them, I think storyline-wise it's easy for a wrestling fan to go, 'OK, that doesn't insult my intelligence. Five guys beating two makes sense.' "

    On TNA using veterans on top while also trying to build new stars: "A couple weeks ago, we did a thing where The Motor City Machine Guns came down and interacted with The Main Event Mafia, and I thought [Alex] Shelley came in and was brilliant on the mic. I just think that the more that we interact with them [the better]. I think the biggest problem booking-wise is that the young guys are so athletically gifted and -- I'll just use me as an example -- they have to work around me. I'm not ashamed to say it. I'll be 50 in July. You know, I'd love to pass the torch, to be that first generation of guys that makes stars. And we've got some guys that are ready."

    On the next generation of TNA stars: "I think Robert Roode is a really, really talented guy. I think he's a natural babyface, although he's working heel right now. He's just solid. He's a combination of Rick Rude and Curt Hennig. He's a real good technical wrestler and everything he does is solid. Motor City Machine Guns -- I watched them do 25 minutes in the Tokyo Dome in January and was just amazed at how athletic and what an incredible pace that those two guys go. You got 'Black Machismo' Jay Lethal, a really fiery young babyface, a lot of athleticism. There's Samoa Joe. You have A.J. [****]. I don't think there's really a better athlete in the business right now than A.J. Some of the things he can do reminds me of Shawn [Michaels] in his peak years, as far as athleticism."

    Check out the full blog entry at: http://weblogs.baltimoresun.com/sports/wrestling/blog/2009/04/recap_of_kevin_nash_on_ring_posts_live.html

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    telvisnostic

    [12]May 24, 2009
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    Samoa Joe was interviewed by ESPN's video game website at this link. Highlights from the interview included:

    His New Look: "You know what, it's really just an extension of the character. That's the great thing about pro wrestling as you can take a persona you have and really keep pushing and pushing it as there really are no boundaries, no lines. It's just a continuation of my character. Where people knew me as a really aggressive person, now I'm over-the-top aggressive. We'll see how far I can push it."

    The First TNA Videogame: "Honestly, it just didn't turn out the way we wanted. It was a good start, but basically you need to realize that game making is a financial process and the time for the game's development really got cut. Two or three months got cut out of the time frame just because Midway needed to get the game out. It had already been delayed a couple of times and they were working with brand new technology and it was the first next-gen wrestling game that they had ever done at Midway. I'm happy to report, though, that we just got done doing another motion-capture session and another brainstorming session and we saw a mockup of "TNA 2" and it really looks fantastic. They put a lot of the features that fans wanted to see in the game, and a lot of things that the first game was really missing. I think fans are going to be pleasantly surprised."

    MMA Influence in Wrestling: "I think more aspects of MMA are going to infiltrate pro wrestling, but at the end of the day, pro wrestling is pro wrestling. In my opinion, people tune in to see these over the top fight scenarios with these fantastic moves that you will never see in MMA unless some mixed martial artist is half-assed crazy. And while a lot of people see that match as MMA, I see it more as a throwback to what pro wrestling used to be. It used to be a real gritty, mat-based, beat 'em up type of sport and we wanted to bring that back."

    The Nation of Violence: "Honestly, like any job in America, I'm paid to translate what is given to me and do it to the best of my ability. I think that is something that a lot of pro wrestling fans don't realize. They get so caught up thinking that these big pro wrestlers, we walk in and tell people what we want to do, but the best pro wrestlers in the world, they went in and were given something and they took it and made it their own. That's where my input comes in. Once I'm given something, it's my responsibility to take it and translate it and make it work in the ring. That's the mindset I've always taken with this business -- I'm paid very well to go out there and do the best I can do with what I'm given. Nation of Violence, that name was my idea. They had a couple of other ideas, and I can't even remember the names, but most of them I was just like, no. But at the same time, if that's really what they wanted, we would've just had to go with it. Fortunately enough, they came to me for ideas and I came up with Nation of Violence. People don't know what it means yet, but as the show goes on, the explanation of Nation of Violence will become very clear."

    -PWinsider

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    telvisnostic

    [13]Jun 12, 2009
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    KearnyHub.com featured an interview with TNA star Abyss today to promote their house show this Sunday in Kearny, NE, where he will face Matt Morgan. The article noted that The Monster's Ball veteran actually has a master's degree in marketing and sports administration from Ohio University. Despite his mask, he noted that fans usually recognize him based on the tattoos he sports. In regard to the physicality of the business, he commented, "It's an athletic event, and what we're doing in the ring takes a lot of athleticism and it comes with a lot of risk. We can be hurt badly at any time, and guys do get hurt all the time. But on the other end, it's also that element of theater, that element of drama that kind of adds to it. That's where the entertainment value kind of comes in to play. So, I think it's definitely a mix of both." You can read the interview by clicking here.

    -PWinsider

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    telvisnostic

    [14]Jun 30, 2009
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    In honor of TNA's anniversary, TNA President Dixie Carter was interviewed discussing various topics at www.tnawrestling.com. Excerpts from the interview included:

    TNA Fan Base: The audience of 2009 is significantly different from the audience during the height of the WWF-WCW run. And we have to continue to change accordingly. Today's fans are smarter, more involved. They don't want their intelligence insulted, and we have been guilty of that at times in the past. Can we please everyone all the time? No, that's not realistic. But you have to strive to please them much more than not."

    TNA Impact's Ratings: ""I think we have accomplished more in the last six- to 12-months than we have in the last several years," Carter said. "I look at our ratings over the last year, and they are up more than 20 percent. We actually don't want that to happen We want everyone's ratings to go up. In order to succeed, we don't think we have to take ratings away from anyone else. As a wrestling industry, we all have to grow the fan-base worldwide. We can't just say we're going to beat Raw (in the ratings). Right now, that's unrealistic. We had to start with a more obtainable goal to beat the ratings of our competitor's third-rated show, ECW – and we've done that. I have heard people say, 'It's not a big deal to beat their lowest rated show,' but I disagree. It's a huge success for TNA, which five years ago had just 300,000 viewers in a Friday afternoon timeslot on Fox Sports. So now we're setting our sights on their second-rated show, Smackdown – and that gap has closed significantly over the past six months."

    TNA Homegrown Performers: "We have an amazingly talented group of young guys ready to break out in a big way. It is their time. They have earned it and deserve it. The landscape in TNA over the next 12 months is going to change dramatically. Our veterans are here to show that their greatness is beyond themselves and to help create other superstars. These (veterans) are secure enough to know that that's what is needed for this company to continue to grow. Their leadership in and out of the ring is unmatched."

    To read the complete interview, visit www.tnawrestling.com.

    -PWinsider

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    telvisnostic

    [15]Jul 10, 2009
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    TNA Champion Kurt Angle told FilmsInReview.com that he hopes to make a transition from pro wrestling to movies. "I'm kind of caught in the middle right now but I am making the jump into movies," Angle said. "I'm in four films this year. They are rather action-packed. One I play a government assassin, one I play a convict who escapes from jail, one I play an MMA undefeated Russian fighter. I am playing all different types of roles.

    "When you get into professional wrestling and you see how brutal it is and you are on the road for 250-300 days per year, it starts to wear on you a bit. I got to the point where I knew I could not do it anymore. I am 40 years old, and as much as I want to stay with TNA as long as I can, I know I can't go full time forever. I want to provide for my kids and give them everything they want and give them all the things that I never had and save enough for them to get through college.

    "Hopefully, I will have the same success that Dwayne Johnson has had these past few years. I can picture myself doing that. He made the transition very smoothly. I respect him for that. Although he is a couple of years younger than me, he's been my hero as far as making that jump from professional wrestling to acting. He has been very inspiring to me." To read the full interview, visit FilmsInReview.com. [Thanks to Dot Net reader Marqui Garmon]

    -prowrestling.net

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    telvisnostic

    [16]Jul 10, 2009
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    Kevin Eck of the Baltimore Sun has posted an interview he conducted with Jim Cornette at this link. Some highlights from the interview:

    On the Midnight Express 25th Anniversary Scrapbook: "You know, it started out as just kind of one of those things: "Well, you know, I've got all the results of The Midnight Express matches; I ought to do a little record book. Just take it down to Kinko's and maybe a few people would be interested in it." And over the course of a year it grew into this 232-page, 8½ x 11, slick paper, 32-page color section, giant pictorial history of not only The Midnight Express' seven years together, but also, conveniently enough, we were right in the middle of the beginning of the wrestling war. So it details the '80s wrestling war between the WWF and the NWA and later WCW, and all the problems the business went through when Turner Broadcasting bought the company. Everybody sees every document there is to do with wrestling these days on the Internet and everybody knows what everybody makes and there are no secrets, but back then nobody saw booking sheets or paycheck stubs or memos to the talent, and I saved all that. So it's reproduced there to give as much of an accurate picture as I think has been published of what wrestling was like 25 years ago and at the start of this whole fiasco. We've got a lot of rave reviews on it so hopefully I did a pretty good job. So it's not just for Midnight Express fans; it's for anybody who likes the inner or outer workings of wrestling. There are road rib stories and funny chapters. I tried to make it as entertaining for everybody as possible."

    On working with Vince Russo in TNA: "We have totally different s.tyles and, no, I have no input in booking. Because we do have totally different s.tyles, it would be counterproductive to the company. I will say nothing good or bad or anything else about Vince Russo or his booking because we have agreed to disagree [laughs]."

    Why we don't see male managers in wrestling anymore: "Part of it is Vince McMahon. He decided that Sable, because they smashed her over despite the total lack of talent or personality, now all managers should look good in bikinis, which immediately eliminated me and Paul Bearer out of the equation. It became the dressing at ringside. Vince feels that you put the attention on the star and the personality. People follow the trends, and the trends at the highest level were to not have any male managers. Male managers were heat magnets. There is no heat anymore in wrestling. Everybody knows that you can't get people to want to go to jail by taking a swing at the heels because they got one over on the babyfaces when they know it's all a show to begin with. It's just one of those things that went by the wayside, along with every other tool that we had to draw money."

    Cornette also talks about his current role with TNA, what he thinks of the business today, his appearance for Maryland Championship Wrestling this weekend and more in the interview, which you can read at this link.

    -pwinsider

    Edited on 07/10/2009 5:01pm
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    telvisnostic

    [17]Nov 20, 2009
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    Christopher Daniels appeared on the "Busted Open" radio show and talked about the televised speech that Dixie Carter delivered to the wrestlers:

    "I didn't mind that it was aired on television," Daniels said. "I don't think she said anything... The people who take it like it was airing dirty laundry, all I took it as was this is the starting point... She said there were going to be changes made and things are going to be happening for TNA, and everybody across the board from the wrestlers to production to the people behind the scenes need to step it up. And that's fine with me."

    Daniels was also asked about Hulk Hogan signing with the company:

    "Honestly, right now it's just sort of a wait and see situation for me personally," he said. "I know that the name Hulk Hogan has been synonymous with wrestling for forever. So many of us have grown up watching him and knowing what he brought to the wrestling business. Now for him to be here at TNA, you have to wait and see what's going to happen."

    He also added the following:

    "I'm not really sure what his status is going to be and what his position is going to be here, but you can just look at all the talk that has happened since he signed. It's become almost a monster in the sense that that's all everyone is talking about. 'What's Hogan going to do with TNA? What's going to happen to TNA now that Hogan is there?' So it's bringing attention to our product. It's bringing attention to TNA."

    -WrestlingRevealed

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    telvisnostic

    [18]Dec 24, 2009
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    TNA Champion AJ S.tyles recently sat down for an interview with The Poughkeepsie Journal and had the following to say about Impact going live on January 4th and Hogan and Bischoff coming into TNA:

    On TNA Going Live on January 4th: "I'm a little surprised, but I'm ready for it, man," S.tyles said by phone from Orlando, Fla., where TNA tapes its weekly programs. "Everybody would like to see that Monday-night war again. Going live is awesome. It's what we're looking for."

    "It's not like we're trying to go head-to-head with WWE," S.tyles said. "But everybody wants to get in there and get live. Nobody can get on the Internet and find out what happened."

    On how much he knows about Hogan & Bischoff's TNA control: "I have talked to Hulk Hogan and Eric Bischoff as much as you have," S.tyles said jokingly. "I'll probably know as soon as you know."

    -wrestlezone

    To read the full interview, visit PoughkeepsieJournal.com.

    Edited on 12/24/2009 12:31pm
    Edited 2 total times.
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    telvisnostic

    [19]Dec 30, 2009
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    Newsday interviewed Taz regarding the 1/4 live Impact special and the company's return to Long Island, NY with a house show in Westbury today at this link. Highlights from the interview include:

    The idea of Impact moving to Mondays Permanently: "I hope so. I hope it becomes permanent. I think that people – especially wrestling fans – the time is definitely now that there's an alternative. I think that TNA can be that alternative. You know, there's a lot of cogs in the wheel at TNA, and if the wheel rolls straight, I think that we'll be a pretty strong alternative down the road. Not right now. This is just a one-time deal, from what I'm being told. I'm excited about it, and I think it's just the beginning of an extremely positive step, by not just TNA for wrestling fans, but by Spike TV to go out and do something like this and bang out three hours life. For people like Dixie Carter, the owner of our company, and Hulk Hogan to basically say we're coming right at WWE, right at Monday Night Raw, I think that's a very gutsy thing to say. And I'm very proud to be part of a company that has that kind of machismo."

    Hulk Hogan and the Current TNA Product: "And one thing you mentioned that I want to touch on, in regards to saying that maybe – and this is your words – that maybe Hulk Hogan is behind the times. I don't think Hulk Hogan is behind the times at all. I'm not buddies with Hulk Hogan, but when I was on Smackdown and Hulk Hogan was there, I got to know Hulk a little bit there. And to the contrary, he's a very progressive thinker in the industry. So I'm excited about him coming in. And I think that, in my opinion, professionally, and on the record, I think that it's not a bad thing if we get back to the basics a little bit. I believe let's get back to the nuts and bolts of the business. I believe that's what we need to do. And I don't know if that's Hulk Hogan's vision. I'm not sure. But I hope so, because I think that's the way we need to go. Let's get back to basics a little bit."

    How Much Being Overproduced by Vince McMahon led to his WWE Exit: "In WWE, just like in TNA, you always have somebody in your ear. Everyone has to be produced. That's the way it goes. I have the executive producer counting us. In WWE it was Kevin Dunn. Now in TNA it's Keith Mitchell. And we get counted in and out of breaks, and when a video package is going to fly up on the screen and what not. You've got to be directed. That's just TV production. At times Vince McMahon, sure, he would get a little active in people's headsets. But it was a little overblown the way people talked about it. Listen, Vince McMahon was in my headset, just like he was in every announcer's in WWE, and he still is, for – I don't know. I was an announcer in WWE, I don't know, seven years, eight years, whatever the heck it was. He was always in my ear. And all of a sudden I had this epiphany to leave WWE because Vince was in my ear? Fine. Great. No, there was a lot of reasons I left the company. Being over-produced was one of them. Yes, it was one of them. But not the main one. My schedule is a lot easier. I'm home with my family a little bit more. I'm not flying all over the world any more for TV's. I'm mainly going to one place. I like that. I like the environment I work in. It's a relaxed environment where you've got to do your best. And you're a performer. You're not micro-managed, and I'm a fan of that. So I like being part of something that's on the upswing, that's trying to climb that mountain. It's always a struggle. I like that. I remember that from the original ECW days. I'm a fan of that."

    What Would Light a New Hot Period for Pro Wrestling: " I think it comes down to giving people an alternative. Look at UFC and the mixed martial arts game. Their pay per view business if phenomenal. And the reason is that it's real, and it's kind of tough to compete with that. We're entertainment. We're a show. WWE is entertainment. It's a show. But, like I said at the top of this interview, I'm big into action. And I believe in TNA we've got a roster full of guys that have the athletic ability as a roster that I would put up against anybody. Let these guys go out there and let their hair down and do their thing. That's what I think. In my career, throughout all the promos I've done in ECW, I had a guy like Paul Heyman, who was my boss, would give me some bullet points and some direction. And the rest of that promo getting over was me delivering on the character that I was portraying. When I say getting back to basics, I think that's something that the business needs. I'm a big believer in that. You get into this business to be a pro wrestler. You're not an actor. The worst actors in the business are pro wrestlers. Acting is not good if you're a wrestler. You're a wrestler, you know what I mean?"

    -PWinsider

    Edited on 12/30/2009 5:43pm
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  • Avatar of telvisnostic

    telvisnostic

    [20]Jan 1, 2010
    • member since: 06/27/05
    • level: 52
    • rank: Guzzlefish
    • posts: 25,288

    TNA executive Brian Diamond was recently interviewed by Scripps News to discuss the upcoming battle on January 4th between the special 3-hour live Impact on Spike TV (8-11PM ET) versus the live 2-hour RAW on USA (9-11PM ET).

    "I don't think we're necessarily going to win that night (ratings-wise), but I do feel we're best equipped going into battle with the product as it is right now," said Brian Diamond, the senior vice president of sports/specials at Spike. "We're all feeling very excited and confident about taking a shot and throwing our hat in the ring."

    Diamond continued: "We want to take a real close look at what worked and what didn't," Diamond said of next Monday's show. "The good news is we're taking this plunge. It could open the door for a lot more opportunities for TNA on Spike."

    Check out the full piece at this link.

    -Wrestlezone

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