Warehouse 13

Season 4 Episode 18

Lost & Found

12
Aired Monday 9:00 PM Jun 24, 2013 on Syfy

Trivia

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  • Trivia

  • Quotes

    • Myka: What are you doing up?
      Pete: It's time for my 3 a.m. sandwich.
      Myka: It's 1 a.m.
      Pete: I'm still on East Coast time.

    • Artie: We need to get a move on and shuffle off to Buffalo.
      Pete: Ah, yes, Buffalo, birthplace of the hot wing.
      Myka: Healthiest part of the chicken.

    • Pete: Hey, Artie.
      Artie: Yeah?
      Pete: We're not gonna have to dig up any dead bodies, are we? 'Cause I promise you, it only looks cool in the movies.

    • Pete: Ah, an uber-rich loner with a seret underground lair.
      Myka: Right? Like who is this guy, Spider-Man?
      Pete: What? Oh my God, no! Spider-Man lives in Queens with his aunt. Batman..
      Artie: Pete, moderate your Comic-Con panel later!
      Myka: What's Comic-Con? (Pete whimpers)

    • Pete: Wait a minute. Are you crazy? I mean, who wouldn't want to be immortal? You might get to see the Browns win a Super Bowl.

  • Notes

  • Allusions

    • Myka: Like who is this guy, Spider-Man?
      Referencing the Marvel comic book character created by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, and who first appeared in Amazing Fantasy #15 (Aug. 1962). Peter Parker, bitten by a radioactive spider, gains spider-like powers and becomes a superhero. The hero, Marvel's icon, has had several of his own comic book series and appeared in TV shows and movies.

    • Pete: Batman...
      Referencing the Caped Crusader, created by Bob Kane in 1939. The DC Comic Book heroes have been seen in many TV shows and movies since, both live-action and animated.

    • Pete: Aleister Crowley? The guy from the Ozzy song?
      Referencing "Mr. Crowley," the second single on Ozzy Osbourne's solo album Blizzard of Ozz (1980). Osbourne wrote the song along with his bandmates, and was inspired by a deck of tarot cards as well as a book about Crowley.

    • Pete: From Harry Potter.
      When Pete sees the Philosopher's Stone, referencing the first book in the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling. The novel was released in the U.S. as Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, and the subsequent movie adaptation in 2001 kept that title. The title was changed because the publisher didn't think children would want to read a book with "philosopher" in the title.

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