Weird U.S.

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The History Channel Premiered Aug 01, 2005 Between Seasons

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7.8
out of 10
User Rating
32 votes
3

SHOW REVIEWS
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Weird U.S.

Show Summary

Weird U.S. explores strange and weird stories from the history of the United States. Mark Moran and Mark Sceurman, authors of the book Weird U.S., are the hosts of this series, and travel across America discovering myths, legends, and folklore. They search for the truth behind the stories, and show that, in their words, "History is full of weirdos."

Previously Aired Episode

AIRED ON 10/3/2005

Season 1 : Episode 8

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Hmm....

    9.0
    Well from the 3 episodes I've seen I'd say this one is a winner, Yay!



    Well from the 3 episodes I've seen I'd say this one is a winner, Yay!



    Well from the 3 episodes I've seen I'd say this one is a winner, Yay!



    Well from the 3 episodes I've seen I'd say this one is a winner, Yay!



    Well from the 3 episodes I've seen I'd say this one is a winner, Yay!



    Well from the 3 episodes I've seen I'd say this one is a winner, Yay!



    Well from the 3 episodes I've seen I'd say this one is a winner, Yay!



    Well from the 3 episodes I've seen I'd say this one is a winner, Yay!



    Well from the 3 episodes I've seen I'd say this one is a winner, Yay!moreless
  • Not so weird for me.

    8.9
    Weird US is a fun a show but I personally find many of the places they are featuring (at least lately) to be all that weird. I like the shows where they take us to true historic places such as the Wabash Caves in St. Paul, MN. or Underground Seattle or even the Winchester House. It was more interesting to learn about the history behind some place like this rather then seeing these guys stuff their face with a Lutafish.

    I do have the show on my Tivo Wishlist just in case a new episode pops up as I am hoping that maybe they will be get back to showing us the true Weird US..

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  • Marks Moran and Sceurman tour America in search of the weird. This dryly funny duo began as publishers of Weird NJ magazine, and have followed up with books Weird NJ and Weird U.S., as well as this History Channel series. See http://www.historychannel.cmoreless

    9.0
    I'm a regular reader of Chuck Shepherd's News of the Weird. I've always followed Ripley's Believe It or Not in print and on the air. I've taken in my share of other weird stops, reads, and programs, too, over the years, from Extreme Homes to Roadside America. But, at the top of my list of weird and informative entertainments, is Weird U.S.



    Not surprisingly, the main appeal of Weird U.S. is the material. Marks Moran and Sceurman have the talent and the work ethic to suss out the truly odd. Their History Channel website promises that these two will find what has fallen "between the cracks" of authorized history, and that's an apt description for the strange phenomena the two uncover. Even for those well-versed in the strange, surprises range from a medical museum in Philly housing a completely excised, intact, human neurological system (The Mutter Museum) to a strange Floridean cult now defunct (Dr. Cyrus Teeds Koreshan Unity Movement utopian settlement in Estero) to the concrete formed art of Mexican sculptors (el trabajo rustico). These odd finds lend the American landscape a richness and variety previously unimagined, and even unimaginable.



    What's more, the Marks (as fans affectionately call them) delve into each oddity with sustained zeal, providing documentarian skill to filling in the background and significance of each find. They probe the mysteries through interviewing caretakers, believers, and experiencers. They conduct research of interesting questions on the spot (such as when they sought out whether an executed New England criminal had been further sentenced to have his skin tanned and made into wallets and other useful goods -- a local legend they learned was at least partially true when they handled said wallet at the bland worktable of a local historical society).



    The Marks are respectful of their subjects, but never neglect to find the humor in it as well. Their humor is sometimes dryly ironic and sometimes wacky, but it does not outstrip the intellectual appeal of their investigations or insult those with whom they discuss their finds. The tone conveys, rather, a sense of bemused tolerance for the subjects of their investigations and revelations.



    The Marks as personalities also add to the show's appeal. Their like sensibility of wry curiosity and easy comradery make traveling with them a pleasure. We're educated, as well as entertained. And that is indeed a rare combination in a genre that too often devolves to superficial sensation (Ripley's) or a tedious fleakmarket crawl over America's grass roots.

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