What's My Line?

Season 7 Episode 6

EPISODE #279

0
Aired Daily 12:00 AM Oct 09, 1955 on CBS
10
out of 10
User Rating
5 votes
0

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

EDIT
EPISODE #279
AIRED:
Game 1: Lt. Ed Lyon - "U.S. Army Nurse, Only Man in the Nurse Corps to be Commissioned" (salaried; it was unusual, but the last 3 words in his occupation overlay screen were hand written!; John said he was an anesthetist; he said he was 6 feet 5.5 inches tall; from Kings Park, NY)

Game 2: Mrs. Nancy Sheppard - "Trick Rider in Rodeos" (salaried; she is currently performing at Madison Square Gardens; from Globe, AZ)

Game 3: Hal March (4/22/1920 - 1/19/1970) (as Mystery Guest)

Game 4: Edward Hemphill - "Makes Sleep Masks" (self-employed; after his game, John had the men panelists hold up their masks, and stated that they were made by Hemphill; elderly; from San Francisco, CA; see notes below) . .moreless

Who was the Episode MVP ?

Saturday
No results found.
Sunday
No results found.
Monday
No results found.
SUBMIT REVIEW
    John Daly

    John Daly

    Moderator (1950-1967)

    Bennett Cerf

    Bennett Cerf

    Regular Panelist (1951-1967)

    Dorothy Kilgallen

    Dorothy Kilgallen

    Regular Panelist (1950-1965)

    Hal March

    Hal March

    Mystery Guest

    Guest Star

    Robert Q. Lewis

    Robert Q. Lewis

    Guest Panelist

    Guest Star

    Gale Storm

    Gale Storm

    Guest Panelist

    Guest Star

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

    FILTER BY TYPE

    • TRIVIA (0)

    • QUOTES (1)

    • NOTES (5)

      • FLIP REPORT: John flipped the remaining cards for the first contestant at four down. Robert Q. Lewis had correctly identified this line, but he was able to make the exact identification, in part, because he had seen a story about this contestant in the newspaper. John again flipped the cards for the second contestant, this time at just one down. John stated that he was flipping the cards due to Bennett's (off-camera) urging. Bennett, almost right away, had come pretty close to discovering her line, and with this hint, Dorothy ended up making the exact identification. Finally, John flipped the remaining cards for the final contestant at three down because time ran out. Following the regular custom at this point, John dispensed with the opening walk-by segment for this brief final game. - agent_0042 (2008)

      • (1) "WML?" SPONSOR AND PANEL WATCH: Tonight's main sponsor was Stopette. The introductory announcement for Dorothy went back to the shorter version: "...whose 'Voice of Broadway' column appears in papers from coast to coast." Gale Storm's nameplate appears to be set in Gothic No. 13, as the type appears slightly wider than the other panelists' nameplates; the typesetting on Gale's nameplate also appears shifted slightly towards the right.
        (2) At the time of Miss Storm's first of two "WML?" appearances this evening, and the only time she was a guest panelist, her "My Little Margie" series had already left the air, running for the last time on NBC (aka "another network") on August 24, 1955. Her first single for Dot was a cover of an R&B (rhythm and blues) tune by Smiley Lewis, "I Hear You Knocking." In the early years of rock 'n' roll, it was a very common practice for "white bread" covers of R&B tunes to be released; Miss Storm's label-mate at Dot, Pat Boone, likewise first made his name with watered-down renditions of such numbers as Little Richard's "Tutti Frutti." As for "I Hear You Knocking," two other versions would become famous in later years: Fats Domino in 1961, and Dave Edmunds in 1971.
        (2) OCCUPATION OVERLAY SCREEN WATCH: On the first contestant's overlay screen, the last line reading "TO BE COMMISSIONED" was hand-written; the remainder of the overlay was professionally typeset in Kabel Heavy.
        (3) MYSTERY GUEST HAL MARCH: While this was to be "The $64,000 Question" host's only "WML?" appearance, he did make a few appearances on another Goodson-Todman show, "I've Got a Secret," between 1955 and 1963. This included five turns in 1957 substituting for regular host Garry Moore. Mr. March's nameplate on the panel moderator's desk tonight was set in the customary Title Gothic Condensed No. 11. It would turn out to be the last time that a nameplate would be made out for a mystery guest.
        (4) "WML?" END CREDITS AND CREDITS CRUNCH WATCH: Following the customary American Airlines plug, we are treated to another rare occasion of the full end credits being shown. This was the first show to display an art card for the positions of technical director and lighting director. The former position is held as of tonight's show, and continuing for the next few years, by Vernon Gamble, and the latter position is held by Hal Anderson. This means that the scenic design credit has been dispensed with, and in fact it won't be until EPISODE #451 of February 8, 1959, when the whole of the "WML?" set was revamped, that a set designer art card is once more seen during the end credits. All this, of course, was shown in the usual demoralizing and denigrating "crunched" manner by GSN on its August 13, 2008 airing of this episode, although the first two seconds of the American Airlines graphic were shown in full screen with the original vintage audio.
        (5) Following the August 13, 2008 airing of tonight's show, GSN ran the March 17, 1953 edition of "The Name's the Same," with host Robert Q. Lewis, the panel of Jerry Lester, Joan Alexander and Meredith Willson, and celebrity guest Edward Everett Horton. - W-B (2008)

      • Edward Hemphill is almost certainly related to a guest on EPISODE #340 of December 9, 1956. On that future show, the second guest is Mrs. Isabelle Hemphill, also from San Francisco, California, who has the line of "Makes Nightcaps For Bald-Headed Men." In a possibly related fact, I knew a man named Edgar S. Hemphill, also from San Francisco, who used to work at Bank of America. He may have been related to Edward and Isabelle. When he retired in 1976, Edgar Hemphill was vice-president and manager of the Stockton main office. He passed away on August 6, 2001 at age 90. - Suzanne (2005)

      • REVIEW: This was a reasonably good performance by the panel this evening. Arlene was absent, so filling in for her was actress/singer Gale Storm, who was appearing on the sitcom "My Little Margie." She did an adequate job but really didn't get into the flow of the game. Guest panelist Robert Q. Lewis correctly identified the first contestant as being the first male to be commissioned in the Army nursing corps. However, when he made his identification, John was in the process of flipping all the cards. In the second game, Dorothy, with a huge assist from Bennett, correctly identified the pretty young philly from Arizona as being a trick rider. In fact, the panel did such a good job, that the guest answered "no" just once, but John, as requested by Bennett, flipped all the cards so that she wouldn't leave with such a low amount. In the mystery guest round, Bennett correctly guessed that tonight's mystery guest was the host of "The $64,000 Question," Hal March. Unfortunately, in the final round, the panel ran out of time before they could guess that the contestant was the man responsible for making the blindfolds worn during the mystery guest round. - Sargebri (2005)

        "The $64,000 Question" was one of the biggest phenomena of 1950's television. Of course, the show's biggest appeal was the huge cash amounts being offered as prizes on the show. Unfortunately, there was a dark secret behind its success. The producers of the show, as well as the producers of the shows "Twenty-One" and "Dotto," were accused of supplying the answers to various contestants as a scheme to help keep viewership high. As a result of the scandal, congress decided to investigate these shows. By the late 1950's, all of the big-money quiz shows that were the rage of the era were all off the air. - Sargebri (2005)

        Hal March was also a game show host who hosted the enormously popular quiz show series, "The $64,000 Question" which was simulcast over the CBS Radio Network. He hosted "It's Your Bet" from 1969-1973. "The $64,000 Question" was forced off the air in 1958 due to the quiz show scandals where contestants were given answers ahead of time. - bossradio93 (2005)

        Hal March talks about: 1) How he gets nervous around all of that money on "The $64,000 Question." 2) His part in the play "Always Fair Weather." 3) How many answers on his game show that he knows personally. 4) How contestants tend to lose weight during the one week period in which they have to decide whether to keep their winnings or attempt to move on to the next level. - Jim's TV Collectables (2005)

      • Tidbits: Gale Storm has a new recording contract with Dot Records. - Suzanne (2005)

        Gale Storm (4/5/1922 - 6/27/2009)

        Panel: Dorothy Kilgallen, Robert Q. Lewis, Gale Storm, Bennett Cerf. Fred Allen and Arlene Francis had the night off.

    • ALLUSIONS (0)

    More
    Less
    • 10:00 pm
      48 Hours
      NEW
      CBS