What's My Line?

Season 7 Episode 12

EPISODE #285

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Aired Daily 12:00 AM Nov 20, 1955 on CBS
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EPISODE #285
AIRED:
Game 1: Richard Kollmar (12/31/1910 - 1/7/1971) - There were two overlay screens: "Dick Kollmar (Dorothy Kilgallen's Husband)" and "Broadway Producer, Plain and Fancy" (as Mystery Guest #1 and the panel was blindfolded, but the "regular contestant" questioning format was used; self-employed)

Game 2: George Petty (4/27/1984 - 7/21/1975) - "Artist George Petty (Creator of the Famous Petty Girl)" (to avoid name recognition, he did not sign in, instead, he was called Mr. X; self-employed; this pin-up creation was an American icon that lasted from 1933 to 1956; he told John he was currently working on Esquire magazine's calendar; from Scottsdale, AZ)

Game 3: Garry Moore (1/31/1915 - 11/28/1993) (as Mystery Guest #2)
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SUBMIT REVIEW
    John Daly

    John Daly

    Moderator (1950-1967)

    Arlene Francis

    Arlene Francis

    Regular Panelist (1950-1967)

    Bennett Cerf

    Bennett Cerf

    Regular Panelist (1951-1967)

    Dorothy Kilgallen

    Dorothy Kilgallen

    Regular Panelist (1950-1965)

    Fred Allen

    Fred Allen

    Regular Panelist (1955-1956)

    Richard Kollmar

    Richard Kollmar

    Mystery Guest #1

    Guest Star

    Garry Moore

    Garry Moore

    Mystery Guest #2

    Guest Star

    George Petty

    George Petty

    Contestant

    Guest Star

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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    • TRIVIA (0)

    • QUOTES (0)

    • NOTES (5)

      • FLIP REPORT: John flipped the remaining cards for the first contestant, Dorothy Kilgallen's husband, at eight down. The panel never did get wise to the trick that was being played on them in this first game, so John delightedly called the game due to time. John flipped the cards for the second contestant at six down because time for this game ran out while the panel was having a conference. The panel was essentially lost and never came close to figuring out this contestant's line. - agent_0042 (2008)

        PUTTING THE "PADDLE" TO THE METAL: A few times during the episode, after declaring conferences, John held up a paddle (similar to a table tennis or ping-pong paddle) that had the words "Small Conference" printed on it in a script font. The purpose of the paddle was to shield the conference from the prying eyes of the panel and also to prevent the conference from being picked up by the microphone. Normally, John uses his left hand to shield the conference. John said the paddle was sent in by a viewer, but he did not name the person or the person's company. John even used the paddle during the mystery guest spot, to the amusement of the audience in the theatre and at home, though not the panel, as they were none the wiser in their blindfolded state. This paddle was never used again on any future episode, which was something of a shame, because it seemed like a useful tool, it was definitely amusing, and it was no doubt a delight to see for the anonymous viewer who had sent it in. - agent_0042 (2008)

      • (1) "WML?" SPONSOR WATCH: For this show, the "Remington Electric Shavers" panel desk billboard is once again displayed. This is perhaps the longest stretch to date for a single sponsor since Remington Rand first alternated with Stopette as "WML?" sponsor in 1953.
        (2) "WML?" PANEL WATCH: While the panel has been introduced in reverse order in the past, this is perhaps the first time the panel was seated the reverse of their usual arrangement, meaning that this was the first of a handful of times over the next 11 years that Bennett would sit in the far end of the panel desk. This is the ninth instance (among still-existing "WML?" episodes) of Dorothy introducing John, and the first time since EPISODE #3 of March 2, 1950 that she did so in the "anchor" position of the panel desk.
        (3) FRED RUBS OFF AGAIN: Bennett introduced Arlene with a tale he asserted that Fred said she told him, about the Tower of London telling the Leaning Tower of Pisa, "I have the time, and you have the inclination." This was the kind of yarn that would come from Bennett's own voice in the years to follow.
        (4) OVERLAY SCREEN WATCH: For the first mystery guest, the overlay reading "Dick Kollmar (Dorothy Kilgallen's Husband)" was set in Kabel Heavy, but his "Broadway Producer, Plain and Fancy" overlay was in the "last-minute" typeface. The overlay/art card identifying George Petty (with one of his "Petty Girl" illustrations) was also typeset in Kabel Heavy, as was the lower-third overlay for second mystery guest Garry Moore. As an aside, it should be noted that when Mr. Petty exited the stage after his game was over, he was the first contestant in several months to leave towards the viewer's right, instead of towards the viewer's left which was now the norm.
        (5) GARRY MOORE: Two of second mystery guest Garry Moore's most famous TV shows from the 1950's-1960's period each emanated from a different production outfit. "I've Got a Secret," of course, was a Goodson-Todman production - that is, until midway through the 1959-1960 season, when the duo sold the show to CBS and Mr. Moore, after which the production was administered by "Telecast Enterprises, Inc." up to its 1967 cancellation. The 1958-1964 version of "The Garry Moore Show" was produced by Bob Banner, who had previously helmed "The Dinah Shore Chevy Show," and would later be a co-producer of the 1960-1967 version of "Candid Camera" which had sprung from Allen Funt's on-and-off enterprise which had been a feature on Mr. Moore's show during the 1959-1960 season. Mr. Banner's company, Bob Banner Associates, was also a co-producer of "The Carol Burnett Show" from its 1967 debut until 1972; to this day, he co-owns the rights to the first five seasons, which explains part of why the earliest sketches from the syndicated "Carol Burnett and Friends" came from "The Carol Burnett Show's" 1972-1973 season, which was the first to be fully owned by Miss Burnett outright. Carol, of course, became a star on Mr. Moore's show, and her early specials -- including "Julie and Carol at Carnegie Hall" (with Julie Andrews) and "Carol + 3" -- were also produced or co-produced by Mr. Banner's company. Both Mr. Funt and Miss Burnett would appear as "WML?" mystery guests in later years.
        (6) "WML?" CREDITS CRUNCH WATCH: As was on a few recent offerings, following the American Airlines travel arrangements plug, the end credits cut off after the art card for executive producer Gil Fates. Naturally, on the August 19, 2008 airing of this episode (the anniversary of the death of onetime "WML?" guest panelist and mystery guest, the one, the only Groucho Marx, who passed away on August 19, 1977), all this was shown in the usual "crunched" manner that GSN has long been inflicting upon its unwilling audience.
        (7) Following GSN's August 19, 2008 airing of tonight's show, the cable and satellite channel reran the May 5, 1953 edition of "The Name's the Same," hosted by Robert Q. Lewis, with the same panel lineup of Peter Donald, Joan Alexander and Meredith Willson as had been assembled for the previous week's show, and bandleader Xavier Cugat as celebrity guest. - W-B (2008)

      • REVIEW: This was a highly unusual evening for two main reasons. First, the panel's seating arrangement was out of order. Second, all the contestants were celebrities. This probably had a huge effect on the panel as they certainly had a very poor night game-wise. In the first game, the panel, especially Dolly Mae, was totally stumped by Dorothy's "loving" husband Dick Kollmar. Dick was on the show to promote his current play "Plain and Fancy" as well as to announce his upcoming production of the "Ziegfeld Follies" with Tallulah Bankhead in the lead. In the second game, the panel was also stumped - this time by George Petty, the creator of the Petty Girl. However, the panel redeemed themselves when Bennett correctly identified "I've Got a Secret" host Garry Moore. This definitely was a night the panel would have wanted to forget. - Sargebri (2005)

        As John mentioned, Garry Moore not only was the host of Goodson-Todman's second CBS panel show, "I've Got a Secret," he also hosted his own five-day-a-week evening show, "The Garry Moore Show." Of course, a couple of years after his appearance on WML, he would host a highly successful variety hour which lasted from 1958 until his brief retirement in 1964. It was on that series, also called "The Garry Moore Show," that he gave breaks to Carol Burnett and Dorothy Loudon. One of the writers on the show was Woody Allen, who would become a frequent guest panelist on WML. Also, when Garry ended his retirement, he brought back his variety show, but it only lasted one season. However, in 1969, he became host of the syndicated version of another classic Goodson-Todman show, "To Tell the Truth," where he would remain until his second, and permanent, retirement in 1977. - Sargebri (2005)

      • VICTOR PERRY CONTAGION! We've had a spate of commercial product mentions in the last few weeks, since the infamous Victor Perry's plugola mention of Arpege perfume. Why, tonight alone, Arlene mentions Simmons mattresses, Adler elevator shoes and 7-Up soft drink. The big difference is that none of these mentions are "placed" by anyone, but just occur during the course of casual conversation. Whereas Mr. Perry's mention was deliberately placed, and was intended to merely appear to occur during the course of casual conversation. - Lee McIntyre (2005)

        PETTY GIRL: Wow! The screen announcing George Petty shows one of his "Petty Girl" drawings! It is the most provocative, even risque, image this old codger has seen on a 1950's-vintage TV show. Her seductive pose, her come-hither smile and her transparent negligee (not just "peek-a-boo," but "see-through") caused TiVo and VCR users throughout the land to hit the PAUSE button. Poor woman - she has no tummy, but you almost don't notice the flaw, for she is so, shall we say, ample in other areas. How did this get past the 1955 CBS "network standards" (censors) team? - Lee McIntyre (2005)

        MOANS AND GROANS: More and more frequently, the panel is asked to don blindfolds for an additional mystery guest in the first round. More and more loudly, the panel protests when this happens. It's not simply because the blindfolds crush the ladies' coifs and smudge their eye makeup. Even Bennett complains, and he hasn't much coif to crush. Blindfolded, the panel is also prevented from making notes on their notepads. They also are prevented from reading the guest's body language. All of these are good reasons to complain, but perhaps the main cause for the groaning is that the mystery guest rounds are particularly challenging to the panel. They can be cause for great personal embarrassment, such as last week, when Fred called the name of a mystery guest WRONG - more than once! The mystery guests are frequently well known to the panel, and it's a matter of no small chagrin when the panel isn't able to identify them. In addition to his competitive spirit, this is probably the reason that Bennett Cerf works so hard to nail the mystery guests' identities. The faster he can identify them, the less likely he is to be embarrassed. Therefore, the fewer mystery guest appearances there are, the less often the panel is put on the very uncomfortable spot. - Lee McIntyre (2005)

      • Richard Kollmar tells us that he has just signed Tallulah Bankhead to star in "The Ziegfeld Follies," which he is producing with James "Jimmy" Gardiner. The revue opened in Boston, MA on April 16, 1956 at the Shubert Theater. Unfortunately, the reviews were bad and this lavish production failed to reach Broadway. It closed in Philadelphia. - Suzanne (2005)

        Tidbits: The panel is seated "backwards" tonight. Bennett gets the pleasure of introducing Arlene, and Dorothy gets the pleasure of yet again introducing John. The panel is pre-seated, though, unlike last week's curtain entrance. Next week, the permanent curtain entrance format begins. - Suzanne (2005)

        Panel: Bennett Cerf, Arlene Francis, Fred Allen, Dorothy Kilgallen.

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