What's My Line?

Season 8 Episode 8

EPISODE #333

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Aired Daily 12:00 AM Oct 21, 1956 on CBS
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Episode Summary

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EPISODE #333
AIRED:
Game 1: Alan Jay Lerner (8/31/1918 - 6/14/1986) & Frederick Loewe (6/10/1901 - 2/14/1988) - "Lerner & Loewe" "Wrote Words & Music For 'My Fair Lady'" (as Mystery Guest Duo and the panel was blindfolded, but the regular questioning format was used; both are self-employed)

Game 2: Don Smith (Donald Smith) - "Owns and Operates Pig Hatchery" (self-employed; breeds pigs; from Washta, IA, which he described as "the coldest spot in Iowa")

Game 3: Bishop Fulton J. Sheen (5/8/1895 - 12/10/1979) (as Mystery Guest #2) He donated his winnings to the 300 leper colonies that are run by the church; see notes below.

Game 4: Alexander McGechin or McGeachin - "Bagpipes Expert (Plays, Sells, Repairs, Etc.)" (salaried; he was all smiles and had a lovely accent; see notes below; from Scotland)
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SUBMIT REVIEW
    John Daly

    John Daly

    Moderator (1950-1967)

    Arlene Francis

    Arlene Francis

    Regular Panelist (1950-1967)

    Bennett Cerf

    Bennett Cerf

    Regular Panelist (1951-1967)

    Dorothy Kilgallen

    Dorothy Kilgallen

    Regular Panelist (1950-1965)

    Alan Jay Lerner

    Alan Jay Lerner

    Mystery Guest Duo

    Guest Star

    Frederick Loewe

    Frederick Loewe

    Mystery Guest Duo

    Guest Star

    Fulton J. Sheen

    Fulton J. Sheen

    Mystery Guest #2

    Guest Star

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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    • TRIVIA (0)

    • QUOTES (1)

      • John Daly: And now we come to the special feature of our program, for which I have to ask my friends on the panel once again to blind themselves, the -- blindfold themselves, really -- the appearance of our mystery celebrity.

    • NOTES (5)

      • FLIP REPORT: John flipped the remaining cards for the second contestant at two down. Bennett had correctly figured out that the contestant's product was pigs, but when he guessed "raises them" as the exact line, John flipped the cards on the technicality that the contestant operated a "pig hatchery." In the mystery guest round, John flipped the cards for mystery challenger Bishop Fulton J. Sheen at two down, saying, "Your Excellency, I don't think we did well enough, so we'll flip all the cards over." Bishop Sheen donated his winnings to the 300 leper colonies operated by his church. Exactly how much was donated is not certain, since all mystery guests were actually paid a standard appearance fee of $500. In addition, John stated that they would donate the winnings "and add some more to it." Finally, John flipped the remaining cards for the final contestant at three down. Bennett had correctly guessed that this contestant played bagpipes, but time ran out before the panel could figure out that he also provided other bagpipe services. - agent_0042 (2008)

      • (1) "WML?" SPONSOR AND PANEL WATCH: The main sponsor this evening was Helene Curtis; on the panel desk billboard was displayed the Stopette brand (on the viewer's left side) and Suave (on the viewer's right side). And this was the second of David Niven's seven guest panelist appearances on "WML?"
        (2) LERNER & LOEWE: On the first mystery guest duo's upper-third overlay, the "&" was of a smaller size of type than their respective surnames -- and such overlay was set in the same font, Futura Demi Bold, as their occupation overlay. This was the first of two appearances by Alan Jay Lerner on "WML?"; he was the first mystery guest on EPISODE #796 of December 26, 1965. Frederick Loewe, on the other hand, never appeared on "WML?" again. It should be noted that CBS was an investor in their musical "My Fair Lady," and the profits from not only the musical but also the original cast album (Columbia Masterworks OL 5090, with a newly-recorded London cast album issued in stereo on OS 2015 in 1959) and subsequent 1964 movie version, were numerous. Alas, George Bernard Shaw, whose "Pygmalion" formed the basis for "My Fair Lady," died on November 2, 1950 -- exactly eight months to the day following the premiere of "WML?" on February 2, 1950.
        (3) "WML?" OVERLAY FONT WATCH: During this period, some occupation overlays used two sizes of type. For example, in the second game, on the first regular contestant's screen which read: "Owns and Operates Pig Hatchery," the "Owns and Operates" text was smaller than the "Pig Hatchery" text. This layout anticipated that of some of the overlays used during the course of the 1968-1975 syndicated version of "WML?"
        (4) BISHOP FULTON J. SHEEN: The early TV personality (of "Life Is Worth Living" fame) was another individual, like "Fritz" Loewe, making both his first and last "WML?" appearance this evening. It was after Bishop Sheen that actor Martin Sheen (born Ramon Estevez) formulated the second half of his stage name.
        (5) "WML?" CREDITS CRUNCH WATCH: A new American Airlines title card debuts with tonight's show, with the logo and background in various shades of grey and the slogan "Symbol of Service" in elegant script. This card will also be in use on early episodes of Goodson-Todman's "To Tell the Truth." As for this "WML?" edition, the end credits only go up to the art card for "In Association with the CBS Television Network." And as is far too typical, GSN's October 6, 2008 airing of this episode suffered from its obsessive/compulsive need to "crunch" the screen during the end sequence.
        (6) Immediately subsequent to the October 6, 2008 airing of tonight's show, GSN repeated the April 20, 1954 edition of "The Name's the Same." Host Robert Q. Lewis once again held court with the panel of Arnold Stang, Bess Myerson, Gene Rayburn and Joan Alexander, and the celebrity guest was veteran character actor Thomas Mitchell. - W-B (2008)

      • A WWII REUNION OF SORTS: Amazingly, Alexander McGechin or McGeachin (his handwriting was very hard to read!) served on the island of Malta in the Highland Light Infantry Division with David Niven as a superior officer! After Great Britain declared war in 1939, David Niven re-entered the British service and served two years in Malta. It was during this time that he met tonight's fourth and final guest. It is possible that this was known by Goodson-Todman and arranged in advance, but possibly not. John may have learned about the connection during his brief meeting with the guests prior to the show. - Suzanne (2005)

      • REVIEW: The panel had a pretty decent outing, despite two goofs from Bennett. One didn't hurt too bad, but the other wound up costing them. In the first game, Bennett did guess that the first guests had something to do with the hit musical "My Fair Lady." However, Bennett made a major goof when he asked whether it was his good friend Moss Hart, and received a prompt "no." Dorothy then took the opportunity to correctly identify Lerner and Loewe, the composers. Bennett did make up for his earlier gaffe when he guessed that the second contestant had something to do with breeding pigs, but in actuality he operated a pig hatchery. Dorothy created laughs when John had to explain to her that even though it was called a hatchery, pigs did not come from eggs. In the mystery guest round, Bennett also correctly identified Bishop Fulton J. Sheen. After the game, John flipped all the cards knowing that the good bishop would donate his winnings to charity, which he did, when he announced he would be donating his money to various leper concerns. In the final game, Bennett again made a crucial error when he didn't keep up with the bagpipe repairman/salesman. This threw the panel off and helped the guest win by default. However, it was a very fun round when guest panelist David Niven correctly identified him as a person who served under him in the army, and this helped to soften the blow of the panel's defeat. - Sargebri (2005)

        As was mentioned earlier, Lerner and Loewe were on the show to discuss and promote the Broadway musical "My Fair Lady." The leading stars were Rex Harrison as "Professor Harold Higgins" and Julie Andrews as Cockney flower girl "Eliza Doolittle." A few years later, the play was made into a highly acclaimed 1964 motion picture. However, it did have its fair share of controversy. When it was first announced that the play was going to be made into a movie, it was widely assumed that both Broadway stars would be chosen to reprise their respective roles in the Hollywood film. However, while Rex Harrison was indeed cast in the film, Julie Andrews was not chosen for the motion picture "Eliza." Unfortunately, Warner Brothers Studio executives decided that Andrews wasn't a big enough name in Hollywood, so they passed her over in favor of Audrey Hepburn. Hepburn gave a good performance as far as the speaking parts went, but due to her lack of a singing voice, it was decided to have her songs dubbed by Marni Nixon. This vocal dubbing may have played a part in the fact that Hepburn didn't receive a Best Actress Oscar nomination, while Harrison not only received a nomination for his performance, but he also won the Best Actor award. Ironically, Julie Andrews got the last laugh when she was nominated and won for her performance as everyone's favorite nanny, "Mary Poppins," in the Walt Disney film of the same name. Another note about the Oscars is that when Harrison won his Oscar, the person who presented him with the award was none other than Audrey Hepburn. During his acceptance speech he dedicated the award "to his two fair ladies" - Andrews and Hepburn. What a nice touch. - Sargebri (2005)

      • THE KISS: During his exit, a devout Dorothy Kilgallen piously dips down and kisses Bishop Sheen's ring, since she is of the Catholic faith. If you listen carefully, you can hear the "smack" of her lips on his ring, since her mouth is near her microphone. - Suzanne (2005)

        MYSTERY GUEST Bishop Fulton J. Sheen was the Roman Catholic Auxiliary Bishop of New York City. He promoted his popular television series, "Life Is Worth Living" (1952-1957). He was awarded an Emmy in 1952 for being chosen as television's "Most Oustanding Personality." John certainly showed affection for him tonight. - Suzanne (2005)

        LERNER AND LOEWE: The talented songwriting team of Lerner & Loewe first joined forces in 1942 to collaborate on Broadway plays. They also wrote songs for movies such as: "Gigi" (1958), "Brigadoon" (1966), "My Fair Lady" (1965) and "Camelot" (1967). - Suzanne (2005)

        Tidbits: Arlene stated that people were paying up to $75 for tickets to see the new 1956 movie "Around the World in Eighty Days" which stars David Niven as "Phileas Fogg." Wow, for show tickets, that was big money in those days! - Suzanne (2005)

        Panel: Dorothy Kilgallen, David Niven, Arlene Francis, Bennett Cerf.

    • ALLUSIONS (0)

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