What's My Line?

Season 11 Episode 43

EPISODE #519

0
Aired Daily 12:00 AM Jun 26, 1960 on CBS
10
out of 10
User Rating
2 votes
0

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

EDIT
EPISODE #519
AIRED:
Game 1: Arthur Mercante - "Beer Salesman" (salaried; he works for The Rheingold Brewery which elects an annual "Miss Rheingold" for use in their newspaper, magazine, billboard and TV advertisements; in addition, last Monday, Mercante referred the Patterson vs. Johansson fight; he is also a Golden Gloves boxing coach and referee, and was a Golden Gloves finalist in 1938; from Queens, NY)

Game 2: Mr. O.T. Gillett - "Cowboy" (salaried; age 83; John said that he rides fence and partakes in round-ups; in addition, Mr. Gillett has a radio program and is known as The Cowboy Philosopher; from Flagstaff, Arizona)

Game 3: Elaine May (b. 4/21/1932) & Mike Nichols (b. 11/6/1931) (as Mystery Guest Duo)

Game 4: Mitch Shapiro - "Puts Sticks in Popsicles" (salaried; he works for the Dunkirk Ice Cream Company and makes 55,000 popsicles per day; from Dunkirk, NY)
.
.moreless

Who was the Episode MVP ?

Thursday
No results found.
Friday
No results found.
Saturday
No results found.
SUBMIT REVIEW
    John Daly

    John Daly

    Moderator (1950-1967)

    Arlene Francis

    Arlene Francis

    Regular Panelist (1950-1967)

    Bennett Cerf

    Bennett Cerf

    Regular Panelist (1951-1967)

    Dorothy Kilgallen

    Dorothy Kilgallen

    Regular Panelist (1950-1965)

    Elaine May

    Elaine May

    Mystery Guest Duo

    Guest Star

    Mike Nichols

    Mike Nichols

    Mystery Guest Duo

    Guest Star

    Eamonn Andrews

    Eamonn Andrews

    Guest Panelist

    Guest Star

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

    FILTER BY TYPE

    • TRIVIA (0)

    • QUOTES (1)

    • NOTES (5)

      • REVIEW: This was a great night for the panel and it hopefully helped ease what had been a difficult week for Arlene in light of the accidental death that she was indirectly connected with. The panel managed to go "three for four" this evening and if it weren't for the shortness of time in the final game, they might have pulled off a perfecto. In the first game, Arlene correctly figured out that Arthur Mercante, who was the referee in the recent Patterson/Johansson title fight, had something to do with beer as part of his regular full-time job. However, it was Dorothy who correctly figured out that Mercante was a beer salesman. In the second game, Dorothy would have gotten credit for a second correct guess if she had not made the mistake of guessing that the elderly gentleman was a cattleman. However, Bennett learned from her mistake and then correctly guessed that he was a cowboy. In the mystery guest round, the panel had a little difficulty in identifying the improvisational comedy team of Mike Nichols and Elaine May, because for the longest time, the panel thought they were dealing with only one person since the duo sounded amazingly alike. However, once Arlene figured out that there were two of them and once Bennett correctly asked if they got their start in Chicago, the rest was easy. The duo was on the show to promote their upcoming theatrical showcase that would be taking place later that year in October. In the final game, the panel was unable to figure out that the contestant put sticks into popsicles in the allotted time so he wound up winning the full prize by default. This definitely put a nice cap on the evening and maybe it helped ease the personal turmoil that Arlene was going through. - Sargebri (2005)

        COMEDY TEAM: Mike Nichols and Elaine May were probably one of the most influential comedy teams in history. They helped to perfect the art of improvisational comedy and helped pave the way for such male/female pairs as Charlie Brill and Mitzi McCall (whose careers were nearly ruined when they were unlucky enough to be making their national television debut on the "Ed Sullivan Show" the same night that the Beatles were making theirs) and Jerry Stiller (currently appearing on "King of Queens") and his wife Anne Meara (the parents of current screen superstar Ben Stiller). Mike and Elaine remained popular until their split a few years later. However, their greatest successes came after their split. Elaine would go on to become a writer and a director. Her writing credits include "Such Good Friends" (1971) "Heaven Can Wait" (1978) and "The Heartbreak Kid" (1972) which she also directed. However, she was also responsible for one of the most monumental flops in the history of motion pictures, 1987's "Ishtar," which she also wrote and directed. Mike, on the other hand, was successful right off the bat as a director. In 1966, he directed Elizabeth Taylor to her second Academy Award in the very brutal "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" His biggest success would come a year later in 1967 when he directed one of the most classic films of all time, "The Graduate." The job he did on that film earned him the Best Director Oscar. Later, he became the executive producer of the 1976-1980 drama "Family." He also would direct several other projects including the groundbreaking AIDS 2003 mini-series "Angels in America." Elaine and Mike would reunite at Madison Square Garden in 1972 when they performed at a George McGovern fundraiser. They also reunited in 1977 to perform at President Jimmy Carter's inaugural gala. In addition, they worked on several film projects, including the 1998 film "Primary Colors." - Sargebri (2005)

      • The mystery challengers, Elaine May and Mike Nichols, were so good at disguising their voices that the panel didn't even begin to suspect there was more than one challenger present until quite well into the questioning. - agent_0042 (2005)

        John Daly asked the panel if any of them recognized the first challenger, Mr. Mercante. This was because in addition to his primary vocation, he also had an avocation of being a boxing champion, as well as a referee for a recent boxing match. The second challenger, Mr. Gillett, was 83 years old and referred to himself as a "cowboy philosopher" because that was his nickname on his radio show in Arizona. - agent_0042 (2005)

        Throughout the broadcast on GSN, there is a continuous gray line going all the way down towards the middle-right of the screen, as a result of a long scratch on the kinescope film. This is a common type of corruption seen on vintage reels of film. Of course, the live airing in 1960 would not have had the line. The damage was introduced during the kinescoping process or on subsequent viewings of the kinescope. - agent_0042 (2005)

      • "ENTER AND SIGN IN" WATCH: While John started using the "regular contestant" introduction phraseology "Will you enter and sign in, please?" in EPISODE #514, tonight's show was the first time that he also used this new phrase for the mystery guest round, rather than his former introduction, "Will you come in and sign in, please?" - W-B (2005)

        END CREDITS GOOF: The end credits of this episode contain a technical error. On the final credit screen, a man's voice is heard in the background asking a question that sounds like "Scott, do you see a monitor?" This vintage 1960 glitch was heard when GSN aired this episode in both 2003 and 2005. - Suzanne (2003 + 2005)

        From Leonard Maltin's Movie Encyclopedia: The improvisational comedienne Elaine May found stardom teamed with Mike Nichols in the 1960s, when they graduated from Chicago's Second City to headline in nightclubs, TV, recordings, and in their own Broadway show. After an amicable split, she took acting roles in Enter Laughing and Luv (both 1967) before making her debut as writer, director and star.

      • "DIFFICULT AND TRYING TIMES FOR ARLENE" John Daly mentioned at the outset of this episode that these were "difficult and trying times" for Arlene, and that they urged her to appear on the show. As she was looking very healthy, this was a mysterious message. John did not explain any further. The answer to John's cryptic message can be found below in the following compiled explanations. - Suzanne (2003)

        From: kenneth@zworg.com (Google Newsgroup Usenet Archive) - Written Dec. 29, 2001
        The year was 1960, three years before Arlene's 1963 car accident where Arlene accidently caused the death of another person. Arlene's New York apartment maid used a dumbbell to prevent a long stylish Manhattan-type window drape from blowing all over the place in their 14th floor apartment. The dumbbell fell and killed a man. Arlene had wanted the windows to stay open to air out the apartment. Arlene, Martin and Peter were out-of-state when the maid [dropped] the dumbbell and the man on the street below died. Her 1978 autobiography matches the New York Times Newspaper pieces more or less accurately. She omitted the multimillion dollar lawsuit filed against her by the family of the 1963 Long Island Expressway victim. You can learn more by visiting your local public library, checking the 1960 index book for the New York Times and then consulting Times articles on microfilm.

        From: kenneth@zworg.com (Google Newsgroup Usenet Archive) - Written Dec. 30, 2001
        The police investigated both the dumbbell incident and the Long Island Expressway accident, but they filed no charges against anyone. Arlene had to hire expensive attorneys to handle them as civil matters. I don't have time to reread New York Times articles on microfilm. I've made only one extrapolation that the articles and Arlene's memoirs don't. We know that as soon as the police traced the falling dumbbell to the Gabel apartment where only a maid was present, someone contacted the Gabels at their vacation spot and they got home a very short time after the man's death. That suggests to me that the maid had a good phone number for the Gabels for days before the accident, so the maid is at fault for not consulting them about using the dumbbell to pin down the long flat drapes to avoid them dancing in the breeze.

        A slightly differing story from "WML Fan" - Written October 15, 2003
        Arlene Francis was in a bad state because a few days earlier, while she and Martin Gabel were at their country home in Mt. Kisco, NY, a tragedy happened at their NYC apartment building, the Ritz Tower Apartments at 57th and Park. (109 E. 57th Street at 455 Park Avenue) An air conditioner had been removed from their upper floor window. A barbell had been balancing this a/c unit. It was placed in the windowsill which held the a/c unit. While cleaning the window, a maid accidently knocked the barbell into 57th Street below. The barbell tore through the canopy of the ground level Le Pavillon Restaurant and hit a midwestern businessman, who had just finished lunching there with his wife. He was hit squarely on the head, killing him instantly. The barbell was traced to Arlene's apartment by the building's superintendent. The media, of course, made the most of this tragic news. It was a horrible tragedy that affected Arlene deeply. You can see the tear in her eye after she came behind the panel. Other than the tribute paid to Dorothy the week after her death, did you ever see the panel and Daly as more of a family than on this 1960 night? Arlene was also involved in a horrible traffic accident on a rainy 1963 Sunday on the Long Island Expressway. One person was killed there when Arlene's out-of-control car (she had to brake suddenly on the wet pavement to avoid hitting cars in front of her that were heading westbound) went through the median and into the eastbound lanes. Arlene was hospitalized for some time after that event. What a shame that such a marvelous lady had to go through these God-awful events.

        From Patrick King: In 1960, a dumbbell used to prop open a window in her Manhattan apartment slipped out of its hold and fell eight stories onto a Detroit tourist who was in New York celebrating his 60th birthday. In 1963, Arlene was driving in the rain when she collided with and accidently killed the driver of another car. She suffered a concussion and a broken shoulder.

        From IMDB Trivia (dollar amount unconfirmed): In 1960, her maid accidentally dropped a barbell from her apartment window or balcony, killing a passerby and Miss Francis paid $175,000 in damages.

      • Panel: Arlene Francis, Eamonn Andrews, Dorothy Kilgallen, Bennett Cerf.

    • ALLUSIONS (1)

    More
    Less