What's My Line?

Season 13 Episode 40

EPISODE #616

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Aired Daily 12:00 AM Jun 03, 1962 on CBS
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Episode Summary

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EPISODE #616
AIRED:
Game 1: Keith E. Davis - "Drill Sergeant for Women Marines" (salaried; he has been enlisted in the USMC since age 17; from Dunbar, West Virginia)

Game 2: Miss Helen A. Wagner - "Vice-President of a Brewery" (salaried; she is employed by August Wagner Breweries, Inc., where they brewed the beer brands Augustiner and Gambrinus; from Columbus, Ohio)

Game 3: Raymond Burr (5/21/1917 - 9/12/1993) (as Mystery Guest) (The overlay screen showed, "Raymond Burr, TV's Perry Mason") . .moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
    John Daly

    John Daly

    Moderator (1950-1967)

    Arlene Francis

    Arlene Francis

    Regular Panelist (1950-1967)

    Bennett Cerf

    Bennett Cerf

    Regular Panelist (1951-1967)

    Dorothy Kilgallen

    Dorothy Kilgallen

    Regular Panelist (1950-1965)

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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    • TRIVIA (0)

    • QUOTES (1)

      • Buddy: Are you on this network?
        Raymond: Which network is this? (loud laughter from audience and John, applause)
        Buddy: This is the network where we get a lotta wise guys, that's what network this is.

    • NOTES (7)

      • This was a rather good night for the panel, highlighted by a great performance by a somewhat inebriated Dorothy Kilgallen. Things didn't get off to a good start, though, as the panel flopped in the first game with the marine drill sergeant who worked with lady recruits. Things did improve in the second game as Dolly Mae, ironically, was given credit for guessing that the young lady was a brewmeister. Actually, she was a vice-president of a brewery, but Dorothy was close enough to receive credit for a panel win. Dorothy shone again in the mystery guest round as she correctly identified Raymond Burr, or rather, his most famous character, "Perry Mason." Burr then jokingly related how he solved the previous night's case on the show using the members of the panel as suspects. This truly was a night that belonged to Dorothy. - Sargebri

      • KILGALLEN WATCH!!! As was mentioned earlier, Dorothy's voice did sound somewhat thick and slurry, but it didn't deter from her performance. Her sobriety problem has reared its ugly head again. As her difficulties escalate, in a few months, she will return to the LeRoy Sanitarium for another attempt to combat her substance abuse problems. She is also intoxicated on next week's episode. - Sargebri

      • As Dorothy mentioned during her introduction of Buddy Hackett, Buddy was about to start filming the 1963 mega-comedy "It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World." Of course, that film would feature some of the greatest names in comedy including Milton Berle, Dick Shawn, Jonathan Winters, Ethel Merman, Mickey Rooney, Terry Thomas and several others either in major roles or cameos. Unfortunately, one star who was to appear in the film but didn't was former WML guest panelist Ernie Kovacs. Ernie was killed in an automobile accident a few months before shooting was to begin. He was to have appeared opposite his wife Edie Adams. In fact, Edie almost didn't appear in the film due to the fact that she was still grieving for Ernie. However, her co-stars managed to convince her to change her mind and appear in the film. As for the role Ernie was to have played in the film, he was replaced by Sid Caesar. - Sargebri

      • FLIP REPORT: John flipped all the cards for the second challenger at six down. Dorothy had correctly identified the guest as being associated with a brewery, but John thought it would be unfair to try to make the panel attempt to guess her exact position. - agent_0042

      • (1) At the time of Raymond Burr's mystery guest appearance tonight, his television show "Perry Mason" was airing on CBS on Saturdays at 7:30 P.M. The series had run in that time slot since its debut on September 21, 1957, and in this, the 1961-1962 season, the venerable lawyer drama had attained its highest ratings ever when it finished in fifth place in the year-end Nielsens. However, a few months after tonight's "WML?" episode in 1962, CBS persuaded Jackie Gleason to return to his old Saturday night berth in a new TV series which was called, for its first four years on the air, "Jackie Gleason and His American Scene Magazine." With Jackie Gleason now occupying the "Perry Mason" time slot, this meant that "Perry Mason" had to be moved out of the time slot that had proved to be so popular for the crime series. The public was not happy with the time slot change, and as its ratings declined, "Perry Mason" continued to be moved around the CBS television schedule until the end of its run in 1966. Most ironically, "Perry Mason" started out in that Saturday time slot upon Gleason's first departure from weekly television in 1957.
        (2) This was the first time since EPISODE #608 of April 8, 1962 that Allstate Insurance was the sponsor. Unlike Kellogg's, which had adopted the more streamlined layout of the sponsor logo on a simple rectangular board (or, in the case of Arpege perfume, an oval board) mounted on the panel desk, Allstate maintained the earlier layout with the words "presents WHAT'S MY LINE?" below the sponsor logo. - W-B

      • Bennett Cerf commented on the "Wall Street financial mess." He was referring to the "1962 stock market slide" when the stock market "crashed" and went into a bear market from December 1961 to June 1962. The Dow Jones Industrial average fell from 714 in March 1962 to 573 in June 1962. The lowest day was June 26, 1962. (Hang on a few more days, Bennett!) This decline was not chiefly due to economic worries. During that time, investors were nervous over the Cold War. The failed Bay of Pigs invasion in April 1961 escalated fears over the possibility of a nuclear attack. Even though the economy was beginning a decade-long expansion, uncertainty over the political and military outlook posed problems for stock market investors. During that six-month bear market, the S&P 500 fell almost 28 percent. Or, as they like to say today, "corrected itself." - Suzanne Astorino

      • Panel: Dorothy Kilgallen, Buddy Hackett, Arlene Francis, Bennett Cerf.

    • ALLUSIONS (1)

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