What's My Line?

Season 14 Episode 7

EPISODE #634

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Aired Daily 12:00 AM Oct 14, 1962 on CBS
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Episode Summary

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EPISODE #634
AIRED:
Game 1: Mrs. Ann Elliott - "Race Track Announcer" (salaried; she works at the Jefferson Downs Racetrack; from New Orleans, Louisiana)

Game 2: Henry Makow (b. 11/12/1949) - "Writes Advice to Parents Column" (salaried; age 12; his column "Ask Henry" appears in 35 newspapers throughout Canada and the United States; he has also written a book by the same name as his column; from Ottawa, Canada)

Game 3: Joan Crawford (3/23/1905 - 5/10/1977) (as Mystery Guest)
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SUBMIT REVIEW
    John Daly

    John Daly

    Moderator (1950-1967)

    Arlene Francis

    Arlene Francis

    Regular Panelist (1950-1967)

    Bennett Cerf

    Bennett Cerf

    Regular Panelist (1951-1967)

    Dorothy Kilgallen

    Dorothy Kilgallen

    Regular Panelist (1950-1965)

    Joan Crawford

    Joan Crawford

    Mystery Guest

    Guest Star

    Henry Makow

    Henry Makow

    Contestant

    Guest Star

    Tony Randall

    Tony Randall

    Guest Panelist

    Guest Star

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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    • TRIVIA (0)

    • QUOTES (0)

    • NOTES (14)

      • A CURIOUS COINCIDENCE: During the introductions, Tony Randall referred to a movie under production starring Doris Day and Arlene Francis. The movie he was speaking about was titled THE THRILL OF IT ALL and it was broadcast on Turner Classic Movies on Sunday afternoon, March 26, 2006 -- just one day after this episode's GSN rebroadcast on Saturday, March 25, 2006. - StevenMN

      • REVIEW: After the weird events of the previous week with the uninvited intruder, this was a fairly normal night for the panel, as far as normalcy goes. However, the panel had a fair performance as they made 1½ correct guesses this evening. In the first game, the panel was totally stumped by the female race track announcer from New Orleans. Of course, the panel couldn't have been faulted, since at this time, women horse racing announcers were very rare. In the second game, Tony correctly guessed that a very young Henry Makow wrote an advice column, but the panel never did figure out that he wrote an advice column for parents. Tony finally got a win for the panel when he correctly identified screen legend Joan Crawford. What tipped Tony off was Joan's comment about runaway productions, which Joan was a vehement opponent of. The main reason for Joan's appearance tonight was to promote her classic suspense thriller "Whatever Happened to Baby Jane," in which she co-starred with her "good friend" Bette Davis. The game ended with Tony giving her a standing ovation, and on that note, the night ended with a very nice touch. - Sargebri

      • As Bennett mentioned during the good nights, there was a great deal of protest from the actors in Hollywood over the practice of runaway productions. Of course, in those days, it meant productions that were filmed in countries other than America. Today, runaway productions are still seen as a problem, as films are still being shot in other countries as well as in other parts of the United States, rather than Hollywood. - Sargebri

      • This wasn't the only Goodson-Todman show that Henry Makow appeared on. He also appeared on an episode of "I've Got a Secret." Also, Makow would continue his writing career well into adulthood. However, rather than continue to write an advice column to parents, he would write a column with a right wing point of view. - Sargebri

      • KILGALLEN WATCH!!! Unlike the previous week when she was obviously very intoxicated, Dorothy seemed well in control of herself this evening. Unfortunately, this would be one of the few rare times she would appear fully sober. Her substance abuse problem would become more and more severe, culminating in her second stay at the LeRoy Sanitarium. - Sargebri

      • Hal Anderson is the lighting director for this episode. - agent_0042

      • FLIP REPORT: John flipped all the cards for the second challenger at five down. He was correctly identified as a columnist, but John figured the panel would probably never guess just what type of column he wrote. - agent_0042

      • After John Daly revealed that Ann Elliott was a horse race caller, she gave a sample of her work. Then Mr. Daly tried his hand (or rather, voice) at race calling. He was actually quite good! Dorothy Kilgallen asked Henry Makow if he offered advice to the lovelorn. He replied, "No." Dorothy then looked at him through the very left corners of her eyes, and I swear she was flirting with him! Makow does look somewhat like Johnnie Ray. Come on Dorothy, he's only 12! - George Balsamo of Montgomery, IL

      • The Jefferson Downs Racetrack is now extinct. From USA TODAY, July 1992: Horse Track To Close - The 90-acre Jefferson Downs racetrack in Kenner, Louisiana, is expected to close November 23, 1992 at the end of the current season. Its owners say the track will be sold. The faltering economy and new state laws that increase a horseman's share of the betting revenue are cited as causes. - Suzanne

      • The first contestant, Ann Elliott, was a race track announcer at Jefferson Downs Racetrack in New Orleans, Louisiana. Unfortunately, the panel went "Maggie's drawers" in guessing her line. This is a phrase which means that they made a lot of "misses" and none of them even came close. After John Daly finally revealed Mrs. Elliott's occupation, Arlene Francis scored the second-best line of the evening when she remarked, "That's the first time I ever heard of a filly calling the race." The audience laughed! The next contestant was a twelve-year-old boy. Bennett Cerf remarked as the boy signed in, "Now, we have a jockey!" I thought that was the best line of the evening! The boy's name was Henry Makow of Ottawa, Canada, and he wrote an "advice to parents" column which was syndicated in thirty-five newspapers in Canada and the United States. Young Master Makow was exceptionally articulate and composed for a young man his age! No one on the panel guessed his line precisely, either. However, Tony Randall got close to the target. He was able to determine that the boy was a columnist and that he wrote a column dispensing advice of some sort. Joan Crawford was the mystery guest, and the last contestant for the evening. Tony Randall was on the ball, again. After five questions to Miss Crawford which didn't elicit any actual information, Mr. Randall then took a shot in the dark, and correctly guessed the identity of the mystery guest. He explained that his clue was her use of the phrase "Runaway Production." - R. A. Benson, Commander, USN

      • During this same 1962 time period, a young Henry Makow also appeared with Garry Moore on "I've Got A Secret." This was not mentioned on this episode of WML, but in 2003, the IGAS episode was aired on GSN. Henry Makow grew up to become an author, staying in his WML occupation! From the net: Henry Makow is the inventor of the 1984 board game "Scruples," which sold seven million games. He is also the author of "A Long Way to Go for A Date," published in 2000. He received his Ph.D. in English Literature from the University of Toronto in 1982 and lives in Winnipeg, Canada. - Suzanne

        Visit Henry's web site at

        http://www.savethemales.ca

      • Tony Randall reported that Arlene Francis started filming a movie in New York City with Doris Day. The film was released in 1963 and titled "The Thrill of It All." - Suzanne

      • At the start of the mystery guest game, Bennett Cerf made a reference to last week's intruder! At the end of the program, he explained that a "Runaway Production" is the name given to films made outside of the United States. Joan Crawford has been active in supporting films made in America, thereby giving jobs to Americans. She opposes "Runaway Productions." Joan Crawford promoted her appearance in the 1962 movie, "What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?" which also stars Bette Davis. - Suzanne

      • Panel: Dorothy Kilgallen, Tony Randall, Arlene Francis, Bennett Cerf.

    • ALLUSIONS (1)

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