What's My Line?

Season 14 Episode 45

EPISODE #671

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Aired Daily 12:00 AM Jul 07, 1963 on CBS
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Episode Summary

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EPISODE #671
AIRED:
Game 1: Mr. Seiji Ozawa (b. 9/1/1935) - "Symphony Conductor" (the panel was not blindfolded because this was before the time period that Ozawa was well-known to the American public; Ozawa signed his name in Japanese characters and John Daly stated his name for the panel; self-employed; Ozawa spoke a fair amount of English, occasionally looking to John for support; he wore a modern-style suit with a thin tie; from Tokyo, Japan; more notes below)

Game 2: Mrs. Jeanette Kraus - "Sells Lobsters" (self-employed; her company, Milton Kraus & Company, imports lobsters from Boston, MA and sells them wholesale; John stated that she runs the business all by herself; from Chicago, IL)

Game 3: Peter, Paul and Mary (as Mystery Guest Trio) - "Folk Singing Group" More notes below.)
Peter Yarrow (b. 5/31/1938)
Noel Paul Stookey (b. 12/30/1937)
Mary Travers (11/9/1936 - 9/16/2009)
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SUBMIT REVIEW
    John Daly

    John Daly

    Moderator (1950-1967)

    Arlene Francis

    Arlene Francis

    Regular Panelist (1950-1967)

    Bennett Cerf

    Bennett Cerf

    Regular Panelist (1951-1967)

    Dorothy Kilgallen

    Dorothy Kilgallen

    Regular Panelist (1950-1965)

    Peter, Paul and Mary

    Peter, Paul and Mary

    Mystery Guest Trio

    Guest Star

    Peter Yarrow

    Peter Yarrow

    Mystery Guest Trio

    Guest Star

    Paul Stookey

    Paul Stookey

    Mystery Guest Trio

    Guest Star

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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    • TRIVIA (0)

    • QUOTES (1)

      • Bennett: Has this product ever been alive?
        Jeanette: Yeah. (light laughter from audience)
        Bennett: Was it either an animal or a bird or a fish? (John chuckles, loud laughter and applause from audience.)

    • NOTES (12)

      • REVIEW: After the previous week's disaster, the panel came back strong and had a fairly decent night, especially Dorothy. Also, this episode marked the first appearance on the panel for comedian, and future Academy Award winning director, Woody Allen. In the first game, Dorothy correctly guest that Seiji Ozawa was a conductor. Of course, this was still fairly early in Maestro Ozawa's career, so the panel wasn't blindfolded. After his game, Ozawa promoted his upcoming performances the next weekend. In the second game, the panel didn't do as well, as they were totally stumped by the lobster saleswoman from Chicago. In the mystery guest round, Dolly Mae once again shined as she correctly identified Peter, Paul and Mary. The trio was on the show to promote several upcoming performances, including their upcoming appearance at the 1963 edition of the Newport Folk Festival. This definitely was a marked improvement, gamewise, over the previous week. - Sargebri

      • PETER, PAUL & MARY: At the time of their appearance on the show, Peter Yarrow, Noel Paul Stookey and Mary Travers (aka Peter, Paul and Mary) were pretty much at the height of their popularity. They were at the forefront of the folk music boom of the early 1960's. In fact, as Bennett mentioned, their then current album was one of the most popular releases in the country that week. Unfortunately, the folk music boom came to a screeching halt in 1964 when the Beatles and the rest of the groups in the first wave of the British Invasion landed in America. However, the real end to the folk music boom came, ironically, at the 1965 edition of the Newport Folk Festival. It was at that festival that Bob Dylan, whose "Blowin' in the Wind" became a hit for Peter, Paul and Mary, shocked the folk music establishment when he decided to "go electric." In fact, Dylan's backing band for the performance was the non-folk Paul Butterfield Blues Band. That moment signaled the death knell for traditional folk music. However, Peter, Paul and Mary would still record several more albums and in 1968 they would score their only number-one pop single when their version of John Denver's "Leaving on a Jet Plane" would top the charts that year. - Sargebri

      • THE TIMES THEY ARE A-CHANGIN'!!! It is quite interesting to note that with the appearance of Woody Allen on the panel, and Peter, Paul and Mary as mystery guests, that this probably was one of the first attempts by the show to reach out to younger viewers. Woody was one of the more progressive comics performing in that era, and Peter, Paul and Mary definitely appealed to more of a youth audience than any of the other singing artists who previously appeared as mystery guests, with the exception of Bobby Darin, Rick Nelson, Fabian and Paul Anka. - Sargebri

      • FLIP REPORT: Dorothy correctly identified the occupation of the first contestant at six down, but in spite of this, John flipped all the cards anyway. John flipped all the cards for the second contestant at eight down because time was running short. - agent_0042

      • (1) Announcer Johnny Olson's introduction for Dorothy Kilgallen at the opening once again reads as "The popular columnist whose 'Voice of Broadway' appears in papers coast to coast." During Arlene's time off the show due to her auto accident, the last words of Johnny's intro for Dorothy had been "...in papers from coast to coast."
        (2) Dorothy's introduction of Woody Allen is missing from the kinescope during the opening segment. Part of Woody Allen's introduction of Arlene is also missing, but most of his comments remain.
        (3) BAD PUN ALERT: This time, the bad pun comes from our panel moderator, John Charles Daly. After Bennett, in his introduction, mentioned how John tossed off red herrings, John took his seat at his desk and mentioned being a bit "hard of 'herring.'" John's fishy pun is an obvious play on the phrase "hard of hearing."
        (4) "WML?" CREW CREDITS WATCH: Tonight, Orison Marden is credited as production supervisor instead of Gil Herman, and Hal Warner is filling in for regular technical director Ted Miller. - W-B

      • MORE ABOUT PETER, PAUL & MARY: Peter Yarrow, Noel Paul Stookey and Mary Travers first burst onto the scene in 1962 with their self-titled debut album (Warner Bros. W(S) 1449), which topped the charts and yielded their first big hit, a cover of "If I Had a Hammer." At the time of their appearance tonight, they had already scored with the album "(Moving)" (W(S) 1473), from which one of their best-known hits, "Puff (The Magic Dragon)," had originated. Just before their mystery guest appearance tonight, they released a single, "Blowin' In The Wind," written by an up-and-coming young performer named Bob Dylan, who at the time had shared the same manager, Albert Grossman, as PP&M. Their recording of the song reached #2 on the charts, and the album which contained it, "In the Wind" (W(S) 1507), made it all the way to Number One. Another song from that album, a cover of Dylan's "Don't Think Twice, It's All Right," also made the Top Ten. While their chart performance had been affected by the advent of Beatlemania, they did remain major fixtures through their appearances at civil rights rallies such as the March on Washington. After a lull on the charts, they returned to the Top Ten in 1967 with a song called "I Dig Rock & Roll Music," whose lyrics skewered such icons of the time as Donovan and The Mamas & The Papas. It originated from their LP "Album 1700" (W(S) 1700, 1967) which would also yield their biggest chart hit, when another track from the album, "Leavin' On A Jet Plane," written by a former member of the Mitchell Trio, John Denver (a client of Milton Okun who was also involved with PP&M), was released in 1969 on Warner Bros.-Seven Arts single #7340 and peaked at Number One. The trio disbanded after the release of their greatest-hits compilation, "The Best of Peter, Paul and Mary - Ten Years Together" (BS 2552) in 1970, with each releasing solo albums beginning a year later. Mary had a minor hit with "Follow Me," but it was Paul who got the farthest with his 1971 hit "Wedding Song (There Is Love)," which came from his appropriately-titled album, "Paul and" (WS 1912); while Peter co-wrote and co-produced Mary MacGregor's Number One hit "Torn Between Two Lovers" (Ariola America 7638, 1976). PP&M officially reunited in 1978 with their album "Reunion" (BSK 3231), and have been performing steadily ever since.

        A side note involving Peter, Paul & Mary was that on their 1966 LP entitled "Album" (W(S) 1648), was featured a track called "Norman Normal." This song formed the basis for a cartoon of the same name which was released by Warners in 1968. Interestingly, this was released as neither a "Looney Tune" or a "Merrie Melodie," but rather a one-time-only "Cartoon Special." One year later, in 1969, the studio ceased its short subject division, and by extension brought down the curtain on their animated cartoon division which had been famous for such memorable and beloved characters as Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig and Elmer Fudd. - W-B

      • A month after Peter, Paul and Mary made their appearance on the show, they performed at the historic March on Washington, which was highlighted by Martin Luther King's immortal "I Have a Dream" speech. - Sargebri

      • Peter, Paul and Mary promoted many engagements, including the upcoming Newport Folk Festival. (They are listed by both their individual names and group name so their appearance will be listed in their respective databases.) - Suzanne

        Their web site: http://www.peterpaulandmary.com/

      • Seiji Ozawa (born September 1, 1935) was already quite popular in the international world of classical music, yet none of the panel recognized him. We have seen this before, the panel was not too well versed in this field. John Daly stated that Ozawa would be performing at the Lewisohn Stadium in New York this coming Tuesday and Wednesday. Mr. Daly also stated Ozawa's following accomplishments thus far (with additional facts added): Ozawa won the Koussevitzky Prize for outstanding student conductor in 1960 at the Tanglewood Music Center. While working with Herbert von Karajan in West Berlin, Ozawa came to the attention of Leonard Bernstein, who appointed him assistant conductor of the New York Philharmonic for the 1961-1962 season. He made his first professional concert appearance in North America in January 1962, with the San Francisco Symphony. Following this WML appearance, Ozawa's conducting and recording career continued to bloom. He was music director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra's Ravinia Festival for five summers beginning in 1964, music director of the Toronto Symphony from 1965 to 1969, and music director of the San Francisco Symphony from 1970 to 1976, followed by a year as that orchestra's music adviser. He conducted the Boston Symphony Orchestra for the first time in 1964, at Tanglewood, and made his first Symphony Hall appearance with the orchestra in January 1968. He became an artistic director of Tanglewood in 1970 and began his tenure as music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra in 1973, following a year as music adviser. He remained with the Boston Symphony until 2002, when he became music director of the Vienna State Opera in Austria. - Suzanne Astorino

      • This kinescope is damaged. Two sections featuring Woody Allen are missing. Possibly, they have been clipped out for use in a documentary, and never restored. These breaks result in a lack of continuity. First, Woody Allen's introduction (from Dorothy) is missing, so we don't know how he responded to her words. Secondly, a question that Woody asks the lobster saleswoman is missing. - Suzanne

      • Tidbits: Arlene finally appears with no sling. Her broken collarbone must be successfully healing. You may have noticed that the "new makeup man" that Dorothy referenced on the June 16, 1963 episode is applying heavier eye makeup to both Dorothy and Arlene in the form of thicker eyeliner and perhaps larger false eyelashes. - Suzanne

      • Woody Allen (b. 12/1/1935)

        Panel: Dorothy Kilgallen, Woody Allen, Arlene Francis, Bennett Cerf.

    • ALLUSIONS (1)

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