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What's My Line?

Season 14 Episode 50

EPISODE #676

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Aired Daily 12:00 AM Aug 11, 1963 on CBS
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Episode Summary

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EPISODE #676
AIRED:
Game 1: Miss Lesley Somerville - "Professional Skindiver" (self-employed; she is the co-owner of The Diving Center which performs underwater photography and demolition; from London, England)

Game 2: Warren G. Harding (Warren George Harding) - "Head of Mosquito Control Project" (salaried; he is the Director of the Plymouth County Mosquito Control Project; he has no relation to the former president who was named Warren Gamaliel Harding; from Braintree, MA)

Game 3: The Kingston Trio (as Mystery Guest Trio) - Bob Shane, Nick Reynolds & John Stewart

Bob Shane (b. 2/1/1934)
Nick Reynolds (7/27/1933 - 10/1/2008)
John Stewart (9/5/1939 - 1/19/2008)

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SUBMIT REVIEW
    John Daly

    John Daly

    Moderator (1950-1967)

    Arlene Francis

    Arlene Francis

    Regular Panelist (1950-1967)

    Bennett Cerf

    Bennett Cerf

    Regular Panelist (1951-1967)

    The Kingston Trio

    The Kingston Trio

    Mystery Guest Trio

    Guest Star

    Tony Randall

    Tony Randall

    Guest Panelist

    Guest Star

    Phyllis Newman

    Phyllis Newman

    Guest Panelist

    Guest Star

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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    • TRIVIA (0)

    • QUOTES (0)

    • NOTES (10)

      • There were several funny moments while the panel was questioning the Kingston Trio. When Arlene asked if the mystery guests were in the recording field, John Stewart answered, "Let me say this, that you are right in assuming that we are in the recording field," doing a pretty good impression of President Kennedy.

        After only three questions, Tony Randall correctly asked if he had heard three men's voices. But then Phyllis Newman asked if there was more than one person there! When John Daly did not treat that as her question, Phyllis said that the only three men who recorded that she could think of were the Mills Brothers, to which Nick Reynolds made noises like an old man. - Hank Gillette

      • REVIEW: For the first time in quite a while, the panel managed to pull off a perfecto, thanks in no small part to the two ladies on the panel, Arlene and Phyllis. In the first game, Phyllis was given credit for guessing that the young lady from England was a skin diver. In the second game, Arlene looked as if she had a lot of fun in guessing that the contestant from Massachusetts had something to do with the control of mosquitoes, or as she humorously put it, the demolition of mosquitoes. In the mystery guest round, Bennett opened the door for Arlene as she correctly identified the Kingston Trio. The group then talked about some of their upcoming concert engagements, including a performance at the Greek Theater in Los Angeles, as well as tours of England and Japan. The good nature of the boys only helped to make a perfect night even better. - Sargebri (2006)

        The Kingston Trio was one of the many folk groups that were popular during the early 1960's folk revival. Their biggest hit was the song "Tom Dooley," which was based on a 19th century folk song named "Tom Dula." "Tom Dooley" went to number-one on the singles chart in 1958. Their other big hit was a version of Pete Seeger's song "Where Have All The Flowers Gone?" They also had big hits on the album charts where six of their releases went to number-one. However, the group's popularity, as well as many other traditional folk artists, went into decline mainly because of the Beatles. In addition, artists such as Bob Dylan went electric, which ushered in the folk rock boom. However, the trio, with all new members, continues to perform to this day. - Sargebri (2006)

        After leaving the Kingston Trio, John Stewart would begin a solo career. His biggest hit was the song "Gold" on his album "Bombs Away Dream Babies." However, he also wrote the classic Monkees' song "Daydream Believer." That song, as of 2006, is being used in a series of commercials for internet auction site eBay. - Sargebri (2006)

        During the questioning of the Kingston Trio in the mystery guest round, Arlene asked if the boys were the Chad Mitchell Trio, to which she promptly received a "no" answer. The Mitchell Trio was most notable for the fact that it helped launch the career of John Denver. Denver joined the group in 1965. Ironically, the person he replaced was the group's founder, Chad Mitchell. - Sargebri (2006)

        A PREVIEW OF THINGS TO COME!!! It was quite interesting to look at the makeup of the panel this evening as both Tony Randall and Phyllis Newman were on the panel together. Later on, in the final two seasons of the show, Tony and Phyllis would, more or less, become semi-regular guest panelists. Also, it was quite interesting to hear Tony refer to Phyllis as "Mrs. Green." Of course, Phyllis' husband was former guest panelist, and future mystery guest, Adolph Green. - Sargebri (2006)

      • FLIP REPORT: John flipped all the cards for the first contestant at seven down, even though Phyllis had correctly identified her a diver. In the second game, at eight down, Arlene correctly identified that the second contestant controlled mosquitoes, but John flipped the rest of the cards for no apparent reason. - agent_0042

      • MORE ABOUT THE KINGSTON TRIO: At the point of their mystery guest appearance tonight, The Kingston Trio had already reached the peak of their career and were about to level off. Their last album to reach the Top Ten was "Sunny Side!" (Capitol (S)T-1935). This was before the advent of Beatlemania, which proved to be a proverbial nail in the coffin for traditional folk music as a viable commodity, as well as proving especially fatal to The Trio's own chart fortunes. After releasing two more albums in the months following their "WML?" appearance tonight, The Trio left Capitol for Decca in 1964 and released four more albums with ever more diminishing returns, before calling it a day in 1967. Their manager, Frank Werber, doing business as Trident Productions, also managed and produced a group called We Five, whose members included one Michael Stewart (brother of Trio member John Stewart). We Five reached the Top Ten in 1965 with "You Were On My Mind" (A&M single #770), which had originally been recorded by Canadian-based folk duo Ian & Sylvia.

        In addition to such well-known hits as "Tom Dooley," "A Worried Man," "Where Have All The Flowers Gone" and "Reverend Mr. Black" (the latter of which had reached the Top Ten in 1963), The Trio, over the years, had also recorded certain songs that would become bigger hits for others. A partial list includes "Seasons In The Sun" (a Number One hit for Terry Jacks in 1974), "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face" (Number One for Roberta Flack in 1972), and "It Was A Very Good Year" (which would become most synonymous with Dorothy Kilgallen's bitter arch-enemy, Frank Sinatra). In addition, after the original Trio disbanded in 1967, Bob Shane tested the waters for a potential solo career and released two singles. His second single, a recording of a sentimental ballad called "Honey," written by Bobby Russell, was test-released in certain markets by Decca Records and went nowhere. The song went on to become a Number One hit for Bobby Goldsboro (United Artists single #UA 50283) in the spring of 1968. Shane would go on to re-form The Kingston Trio with new members. The group still performs today in 2006, although Shane has since retired from The Trio due to health problems. - W-B

      • Kingston Trio member John Stewart would later gain fame for writing the classic Monkees' tune "Daydream Believer" (Colgems single #66-1012) which went to number one in 1967. He also would have a hit on his own with the song "Gold" in 1979 (RSO single #RS 931). That song was produced by Fleetwood Mac's Lindsey Buckingham and featured backing vocals by another Fleetwood Mac member, Stevie Nicks. "Gold" originated from the album "Bombs Away Dream Babies" (RSO RS-1-3051), the title of which was derived from a phrase used by John's Kingston Trio predecessor, Dave Guard, in lieu of counting down prior to starting a song. - Sargebri + W-B

      • The Kingston Trio explained how they chose their group name. They said that during the time the trio was formed, Calypso music was popular, as were the songs of Harry Belafonte. They explained that they quickly needed a name and chose the name "Kingston" in tribute to the city of Kingston, Jamaica. Established in 1957, the original Kingston Trio members were Bob Shane, Dave Guard and Nick Reynolds. Dave Guard left The Trio in 1961 and was replaced by John Stewart. John Stewart would later gain fame as a solo artist as well as a songwriter. He wrote "Daydream Believer" for The Monkees, which wound up becoming a million selling number-one single. - Suzanne (2004)

        More information can be found on their web site:

        http://www.kingstontrio.com/

      • TWO TONYS TONIGHT: Tony Randall is a guest panelist and Phyllis Newman won a 1962 Tony Award for excellence on Broadway in her play, "Subways Are for Sleeping." She won the award for "Best Featured Actress in a Musical." This musical played at the St. James Theatre and ran for 205 total performances. - Suzanne

      • At the time of the original airing of tonight's show, Dorothy Kilgallen is possibly still in London, England, as was announced on the July 14, 1963 episode. However, tonight's episode was taped prior to the transmission of the live EPISODE #656 of March 24, 1963, which was the week Dorothy began her second treatment at the LeRoy Sanitarium in New York City to try to combat her recurring substance abuse issues. - Suzanne + W-B

      • Panel: Arlene Francis, Tony Randall, Phyllis Newman, Bennett Cerf.

      • During the end credits, Johnny Olson announced that this episode was prerecorded. From Gil Fates' logs, we know this episode was taped on March 24, 1963. - Suzanne

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