What's My Line?

Season 15 Episode 30

EPISODE #705

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Aired Daily 12:00 AM Mar 22, 1964 on CBS
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Episode Summary

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EPISODE #705
AIRED:
Game 1: Mrs. Elaine Mason - "Prepares Income Tax Returns" (self-employed; she owns and operates D & E Mason Income Tax Service; she stumped the panel; from Chicago, IL)

Game 2: Mr. Ed Dempsey - "Makes Aspirin Tablets" (salaried; he works for the Norwich Pharmaceutical Company; he produces 9 million aspirin tablets per day; from Norwich, NY)

Game 3: Louis Armstrong (8/4/1901 - 7/6/1971) (as Mystery Guest) He signed in as "Satchmo," his famous nickname, which is short for "Satchel Mouth." . .moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
    John Daly

    John Daly

    Moderator (1950-1967)

    Arlene Francis

    Arlene Francis

    Regular Panelist (1950-1967)

    Bennett Cerf

    Bennett Cerf

    Regular Panelist (1951-1967)

    Dorothy Kilgallen

    Dorothy Kilgallen

    Regular Panelist (1950-1965)

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

    FILTER BY TYPE

    • TRIVIA (1)

      • WHAT'S IN A NAME? As Arlene is about to guess the product of Ed Dempsey, the aspirin manufacturer, she asks, "Can we use a brand name?" She showed concern because the broadcast media treated the use of brand names in unauthorized settings very carefully from its earliest days in the 1920s until the 1990s when cautions were relaxed. While "aspirin" was a name in the public domain in 1964, it had not always been so. The Bayer company created the name Aspirin and registered it as a trademark in the late 1800's, but within 20 years, the name was in common use and a federal court ruled in 1921 that the trademark owner no longer had a claim to the name. Since then, other owners of common trade names have exerted concerted efforts to keep their names out of the public domain.

        Common trademarks often incorrectly used as generic terms include Band-Aid, Dumpster, Jell-O, Kleenex, Scotch tape and Xerox. Those names are still registered as trademarks.

        Common trademarked names which are struggling to retain their trademarked status include Ace bandage, Advil, Ajax, Aqua-Lung, Baggies, Beer Nuts, BVDs, ChapStick, Crescent wrench, Freon, Hells Angels, Hula Hoop, Kitty Litter, Ouija game board, Pampers, Ping-Pong, Port-a-Potty, Weedeater, Windex, Ziplock and more.

        The list of formerly copyrighted names that have entered the public domain, much to their owners' regret, is surprisingly long and includes Allen wrench, bikini, cellophane, crock pot, dry ice, escalator, gramophone, granola, heroin (trademarked by Bayer as a pain reliever!), lanolin, laundromat, mimeograph, plasterboard, yo-yo and zipper.

        For more reading: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_generic_and_genericized_trademarks

        Lee McIntyre (2006)

    • QUOTES (0)

    • NOTES (6)

      • WELCOME HOME BENITO!!! Tonight marked the return of The Squire of Mount Kisco after his well-deserved three week South American vacation. Bennett's return must have inspired the panel as they went a respectable 2 for 3 this evening. Unfortunately, things didn't start off too well as the panel was thoroughly stumped by the tax preparer from Chicago. In fact, her good looks might have thrown the panel, because they first thought she was in some form of entertainment. However, their luck improved in the second game as Arlene correctly guessed that the contestant dealt with aspirin. Of course, John took the opportunity to make a joke that once everyone's taxes were done, they probably needed to take some aspirin. In the mystery guest round, jazz legend Louis Armstrong, who signed in using his famous nickname "Satchmo," almost fooled the panel by using short and soft "yep" and "nope" replies to answer the panel's questions. However, a well-timed conference called by guest panelist Ross Hunter allowed him and Dorothy to correctly identify Armstrong at the last possible second. "Satchmo," upon Arlene's request, then delighted the audience by giving an a cappella rendition of his big hit "Hello, Dolly!" That definitely put a nice exclamation point on Bennett's homecoming. - Sargebri (2006)

        TAXING MATTERS: Even though the first contestant's appearance could be seen as somewhat of a rib on everyone due to the fact that it was tax season, it also was somewhat of a public service reminder to let the public watching WML at home and in the studio know that the tax deadline was fast approaching and that everyone should get their taxes finished and mailed. - Sargebri

        ASPIRIN: When Arlene was questioning the aspirin manufacturer, she asked if his product could be taken every day. Of course, close to thirty years later, it would be discovered that a daily low-dose of aspirin could be taken to help prevent heart attacks. In addition, it was discovered that taking aspirin was also a way to help save someone who was experiencing a heart attack. - Sargebri

      • (1) ROSS HUNTER: Tonight's guest panelist, Ross Hunter (1920-1996), was co-producer of the 1963 film "The Thrill of It All" in which regular "WML?" panelist Arlene Francis appeared as "Mrs. Fraleigh" - in fact, she mentioned her involvement in the picture during her introduction of him. Mr. Hunter's other credits as producer included the "Tammy" series of movies, beginning with "Tammy and the Bachelor" (1957) and continuing through such sequels as "Tammy Tell Me True" (1961) and "Tammy and the Doctor" (1963); the 1959 movie "Pillow Talk" which was the first screen coupling of Doris Day and Rock Hudson, and co-starred frequent "WML?" guest panelist Tony Randall; the 1959 remake of "Imitation of Life" which starred Lana Turner; the 1962 picture "If a Man Answers" which starred occasional "WML?" mystery guest and guest panelist Bobby Darin; and the 1970 film "Airport," with an all-star cast including Burt Lancaster, Dean Martin, Jean Seberg and Jacqueline Bisset.

        One of the many movies Mr. Hunter produced, the 1973 musical remake of "Lost Horizon," with songs by Burt Bacharach and Hal David, choreography by the legendary Hermes Pan, and featuring the likes of Liv Ullmann, Peter Finch, Olivia Hussey, Bobby Van and John Gielgud in the cast, was listed among "The Fifty Worst Films of All Time" in the 1978 book of the same name by Harry Medved and Randy Dreyfuss, and did so poorly at the box office that the picture was nicknamed "Lost Investments." As of 2006, the 1973 version of "Lost Horizon" has never been legally issued on home video or DVD, although pirate DVDs made from the 1992 Pioneer LaserDisc version do exist.
        (2) "LIVE" WATCH: The word "live" in Johnny Olson's intro is kept uncut and intact on the kinescope of tonight's live show.
        (3) "WML?" END CREDITS WATCH: For the second week in a row, the "WML?" end credit sequence only goes so far as the "Mark Goodson / Bill Todman" slide card graphic. However, based on the future EPISODE #725 of August 9, 1964 which was pre-taped prior to tonight's live show, Andre St. Laurent is the associate director of this episode as well. - W-B

      • This was a very fun show! The tone was set with the female tax preparer. She had the panel in stitches with the way she answered their questions and she totally had them fooled. The aspirin maker was also funny and Arlene's questioning of him only heightened the hilarity. Next, Louis Armstrong really had the audience rolling with the way he answered his questions. After his game, he brought the house down with his a cappella rendition of "Hello, Dolly!" It is interesting to note that his version of "Hello, Dolly!" wound up being the number three single for the entire year of 1964, especially due to the fact that this was at the height of Beatlemania. The fun didn't stop after the mystery guest round, as there were more laughs yet when the panel said good night. When Arlene said good night to Martin over the air, and said he better be behaving in California, and then with Dorothy saying that Dick better behave too, I let out a laugh. The funniest part of the good nights, though, had to go to Bennett. He said that he knew Phyllis was behaving because she was sitting right there in the audience! - Sargebri (2004)

        The original Broadway version of "Hello, Dolly!" opened at the St. James Theatre and ran from January 16, 1964 to December 27, 1970, for a total of 2,844 performances. Carol Channing played the lead, "Mrs. Dolly Gallagher Levi." Louis Armstrong was not a performer in the Broadway play, but he recorded a single of the title song (issued on Kapp single #K-573) and it was in the "Top 10" when he made this "WML?" appearance. (It eventually reached Number One on the music charts, replacing The Beatles' "Can't Buy Me Love" which held the top spot at the time of tonight's show.) Years later, Louis had a part as the Orchestra Leader in the 1969 Barbra Streisand film version of "Hello, Dolly!" - Suzanne + W-B

      • SATCHMO - THE GREAT LOUIS ARMSTRONG:

        To disguise his distinctive voice, Louis Armstrong used a tiny "nope" and "yes" for his answers, and it took nine no's and a conference before guest panelist Ross Hunter and Dorothy Kilgallen identified him. As Arlene so often does with singers, she asked Louis to sing his hit song "Hello, Dolly!" To the utter amazement of the entire WML staff, Louis proceeded to sing several lines of his song, not just a few bars as the guests sometimes do. This wonderful performance makes this episode of WML a true classic indeed! - Suzanne (2004)

        LOUIS ARMSTRONG AND THE SONG THAT WASN'T SUPPOSED TO BE:

        In Gil Fates' 1978 What's My Line? book, he reports that "Armstrong was accompanied to the theater that night, as he was everywhere, every night, by his manager Joe Glazer." Fates goes on to say that Glazer initially refused Bob Bach's request to allow Louis Armstrong to appear on "What's My Line?" because Glazer "had booked Louis on The Perry Como Show where for a fee of five thousand dollars he was to sing his famous 'Hello, Dolly!' on television for the first time." After discussions, Armstrong's "What's My Line? appearance was approved and Louis Armstrong was booked on WML on the strict condition that he "plug his Como appearance and did not sing 'Hello, Dolly!'"

        Finally, the night of Armstrong's appearance on WML arrived. His game went well. After Louis' identity had been determined by the panel, Arlene requested "Louis, dear, do sing 'Hello, Dolly!' for us." What happened next was nothing short of amazing. In his book, Fates writes, "'Please, just a few bars,' begged Arlene. The audience, unaware of Joe Glazer's contract, broke into applause and cheering. They wouldn't stop. Galzer, very much aware of his contract, was gripping the wall as if he was going to vault over it. Finally Louis broke into the Armstrong grin. With his handkerchief clutched in his hand, he pointed his finger at Arlene and, a cappella, began to sing. The audience hushed. Glazer spun around to kill Bob Bach. But Bob Bach had long since gone. Louis sang eight bars, sixteen bars, the whole damn song right to the end and the house came apart. As a matter of fact we never saw or heard from him again. Louis Armstrong did appear on The Perry Como Show and he did sing, 'Hello, Dolly!' How much of the five thousand dollars he got, I don't know. I do know that What's My Line? had the great Louis Armstrong as a Mystery Guest and our presentation of the world's television premiere of his 'Hello, Dolly!' didn't cost us an extra nickel." - agent_0042 (2006)

        Gil's full text of the story is below:

        (Begin Gil Fates quote)

        Louis Armstrong was the Mystery Guest on March 22, 1964, just one month after the original "Hello, Dolly!" had opened at the St. James Theater on West 44th Street. Louis had cut a record of the title song and it was a smash. It had already hit the gold and was still climbing. You couldn't turn on the radio for more than five minutes without hearing it at least once. Armstrong was accompanied to the theater that night, as he was everywhere, every night, by his manager Joe Glazer.

        Now, Joe Glazer was one very tough cookie. A short, cigar smoking, very intimidating fellow. It seems that Joe Glazer had booked Louis on "The Perry Como Show" where for a fee of five thousand dollars he was to sing his famous "Hello, Dolly!" on television for the first time. When Bob Bach approached Glazer to book Louis for Line at our standard five hundred dollar fee, Joe refused at first, but at Bob's insistence he called the Como people to find out if they'd mind if Louis went on our show. Como's producer said it was okay with him as long as Louis did plug his Como appearance and did not sing "Hello, Dolly!."

        Glazer and Bob Bach were standing in the back of the theater, leaning over the wall behind the last row of seats. The game was over rather quickly because the Armstrong voice was not one easily disguised. Even his grunt was a giveaway. As Arlene took off her blindfold and smoothed out her eyelashes she leaned forward and said "Louis, dear, do sing 'Hello, Dolly!'" for us.' Next to him, in the back of the house, Bob Bach felt Joe Glazer stiffen. Onstage Louis demurred.

        "Please, just a few bars," begged Arlene. The audience, unaware of Joe Glazer's contract, broke into applause and cheering. They wouldn't stop. Glazer, very much aware of his contract, was gripping the wall as if he was going to vault over it. Finally Louis broke into the Armstrong grin. With his handkerchief clutched in his hand, he pointed his finger at Arlene and, a cappella, began to sing. The audience hushed. Glazer spun around to kill Bob Bach. But Bob Bach had long since gone.

        Louis sang eight bars, sixteen bars, the whole damn song right to the end and the house came apart. Glazer was already apart. As a matter of fact we never saw or heard from him again. Louis Armstrong did appear on "The Perry Como Show" and he did sing "Hello, Dolly!" How much of the five thousand dollars he got, I don't know. I do know that "What's My Line?" had the great Louis Armstrong as a Mystery Guest and our presentation of the world's television premiere of his "Hello, Dolly!" didn't cost us an extra nickel.

        (End Gil Fates quote)

      • (1) Arlene's famous heart-shaped necklace was on "backwards" and the diamond heart pendant was not visible, but you could see the rear clasp at her neckline. She also wore a matinee-length strand of pearls. - Suzanne (2006)

        (2) John Daly told us to notice the "tax" theme to the contestant occupations. Income tax preparation and aspirin, yes, they go hand in hand! - Suzanne (2004)

      • Ross Hunter (5/6/1920 - 3/10/1996)

        Panel: Arlene Francis, Ross Hunter, Dorothy Kilgallen, Bennett Cerf.

    • ALLUSIONS (1)

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