What's My Line?

Season 15 Episode 37

EPISODE #712

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Aired Daily 12:00 AM May 10, 1964 on CBS
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Episode Summary

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EPISODE #712
AIRED:
Game 1: Bill Hartack (12/9/1932 - 11/26/2007) - "Jockey (Four Time Kentucky Derby Winner)" (as Mystery Guest #1 and the panel was blindfolded but the regular questioning format was used; salaried; John mentioned that he broke the track record riding the horse Northern Dancer)

Game 2: Manley J. Luckey - "Makes Sober Meters (to Test Intoxication)" (self-employed; he owns Luckey Laboratories, Inc.; to use his device, the subject breathes into a mouthpiece and if the subject is intoxicated, the crystals inside the attached balloon turn green; his measuring device is currently being used exclusively by law enforcement agencies but he is working on distributing a smaller home version; from San Bernardino, CA)

Game 3: Beatrice Lillie (5/29/1894 - 1/20/1989) (as Mystery Guest #2) . .moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
    John Daly

    John Daly

    Moderator (1950-1967)

    Arlene Francis

    Arlene Francis

    Regular Panelist (1950-1967)

    Bennett Cerf

    Bennett Cerf

    Regular Panelist (1951-1967)

    Dorothy Kilgallen

    Dorothy Kilgallen

    Regular Panelist (1950-1965)

    Bill Hartack

    Bill Hartack

    Mystery Guest #1

    Guest Star

    Beatrice Lillie

    Beatrice Lillie

    Mystery Guest #2

    Guest Star

    Allan Sherman

    Allan Sherman

    Guest Panelist

    Guest Star

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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    • TRIVIA (0)

    • QUOTES (1)

      • Bennett: John, could I ask Bea Lillie a question?
        John: Yes.
        Bennett: How do you manage to look a year younger every year?
        Beatrice: Well, influence. (loud laughter)
        Bennett: Influence with whom?
        Beatrice: God.
        Bennett: Influence with whom?
        Beatrice: Well, I'm not telling.

    • NOTES (6)

      • MANLEY J. LUCKEY - THEN AND NOW: It was a delight to see Manley Luckey, inventor, entrepreneur, rancher, and personal friend, on GSN's 2006 broadcast of tonight's show. At the time of this 1964 episode, Manley and his family were members of the Colton, California, Seventh-day Adventist church pastored by my father, Bob McIntyre. The Luckeys were generous and active in the church and were well-loved by the congregation, both before and after Manley's appearance on "What's My Line?" Although my father and I had lost contact with the Luckeys over the years, after viewing this episode on GSN on June 12, 2006, I was able to locate and reconnect with them. As it turns out, they still live in southern California. Now 81, Manley told me that he is still active in business. He said that he owns several ranches and is developing a shopping center in a rapidly-developing city near the Mojave River. In the 40-plus years since the live WML telecast, the Luckeys have never seen a recording of his appearance on the show. When I told him that I recorded the episode for him, and that I will be delivering it personally in the company of his former pastor, my dad, he was thrilled at the prospect. - Lee McIntyre

      • HAPPY MOTHER'S DAY!!! This episode took place on Mother's Day 1964 and once again the panel had a fairly good performance as they went 2 for 3 this evening. In the first game, the panel was requested by John to blindfold themselves, because they may have recognized the Kentucky Derby winning jockey Bill Hartack. Hartack had been in the news because he had just ridden Northern Dancer to victory. However, once Bennett got on the topic of sports and then narrowed it down to horse racing, the panel's victory was assured. In the second game, the panel wasn't as lucky as they were totally stumped by the breathalyzer maker from California. In the mystery guest round, Arlene correctly identified theater legend Beatrice Lillie. Miss Lillie was on the show to promote the play "High Spirits," in which she currently was appearing. She then delighted the audience with her anecdotes about the play's writer Noel Coward. This definitely was a fun night. - Sargebri

      • (1) "LIVE" WATCH: Tonight's show was broadcast live, but the kinescope recording of this edition once again had the word "live" cut out of the intro - the eighth known episode to have this happen.
        (2) During the introductions, Allan Sherman - who appeared tonight minus his trademark glasses - mentioned once proposing a musical where Arlene was practically the only receptive audience. It was not made clear whether he was referring to his 1957 attempt to do a "Jewish"-themed parody version of the 1956-1962 Broadway musical (and 1964 motion picture) "My Fair Lady." For infringement reasons, the owners of the rights to "My Fair Lady" did not allow Allan to produce his play, thereby putting the kibosh on his idea. This event would have taken place during the time that Allan was still producing Goodson-Todman's "I've Got a Secret." Songs from Mr. Sherman's aborted parody included "With a Little Bit of Lox," "I've Got the Customers to Face," and "Get Me to the Temple on Time" which were spoofs of "With a Little Bit of Luck," "I've Grown Accustomed to her Face," and "Get Me to the Church on Time."
        (3) A BLAST FROM THE PAST: After showing his usual exasperation at Bennett's aforementioned "'spilling' bee" story, John once again uses his old "Good evening, ladies and gentlemen, welcome to 'What's My Line?'" opening salutation. - W-B

        ALLAN SHERMAN, 1964 MINI-DISCOGRAPHY: Within a few months of his guest panelist appearance tonight, Allan Sherman released two albums in succession. First was "For Swingin' Livers Only!" (Warner Bros. W(S) 1569, released November 1964), the title of which was a parody of Frank Sinatra's 1956 LP "Songs for Swingin' Lovers!" (Capitol W-653). On the cover, Allan appeared sans glasses, which were worn by the woman with whom he posed. Among the tracks were "Pop Hates The Beatles," which was obviously written in reaction to the "British Invasion" phenomenon known as "Beatlemania." The record got as high as #32 on the album charts, and was the last album on which Lou Busch was his musical director.
        The other record Mr. Sherman lent his talents to was a collaboration with Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops, "Peter and the Commissar" (RCA Victor/Red Seal LM/LSC-2773, also released November 1964), a Cold War retelling and updating of Sergei Prokofiev's chestnut "Peter and the Wolf," recorded live at Tanglewood on July 22, 1964. It was the only comedy album ever issued on RCA's Red Seal label, and the first album Allan highlighted to fail to make the album charts.
        Besides the two LP's outlined above, Mr. Sherman, in the summer of 1964, released a new single, "Hello Mudduh, Hello Fadduh! (New 1964 Version)," which had been recorded during his appearance on the May 22, 1964 broadcast of "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson"; the new record wasn't as successful as his original 1963 version. - W-B

        LP TITLE PARODIES: Mr. Sherman's "For Swingin' Livers Only!" was hardly the only album to parody the title of the aforementioned Sinatra album. Other examples included Peter Sellers' 1959 album "Songs for Swingin' Sellers" (Parlophone (UK) PMC 1111/PCS 3003), which was more comedy-oriented than musical in nature; and Buddy Greco's 1960 album "Songs for Swinging Losers" (Epic LN 3746/BN 585). - W-B

        BILL COSBY: Allan also had a hand in the emergence of Bill Cosby as a popular stand-up comedian. In the summer of 1963, when Mr. Sherman was guest-hosting "The Tonight Show," Bill made the first of many appearances and made an immediate positive impression with audiences. Allan was also credited as producer of Mr. Cosby's very first album, the Grammy-nominated "Bill Cosby Is A Very Funny Fellow, Right!" (Warner Bros. W(S) 1518, 1963), but Cosby was later quoted as saying Mr. Sherman had very little to do with the actual production of the record. That album's success, and that of subsequent LP's such as "I Started Out As A Child" (Warner Bros. W(S) 1567), would ultimately lead to Cosby's being cast in the landmark TV series "I Spy" which ran on NBC from 1965 to 1968. - W-B

      • BAD PUN ALERT: An example of Bennett Cerf's humor showed on this episode. When he was introducing John Daly, Bennett told of a dinner where John had spilled all of his food. He said John was the winner of the "spilling" bee. - ironcreekguy

        RECAP: As usual, Bennett tells one of his groaners with the "spilling bee" joke. This was Allan Sherman's second appearance in less than two months. He was on EPISODE #704 of March 15, 1964 as a mystery guest, and tonight he was on the panel. The breathalyzer maker really had the audience in stitches! In addition, he had the panel completely fooled. Also, if you look at Dorothy, you will notice that she has a new hairstyle on this episode. It makes her look more regal, as if she were going to a ball. - Sargebri (2004)

      • (1) HAPPY MOTHER'S DAY 1964! Dorothy introduced Allan Sherman as "her son" as a joke on the 1962 comedy recording Allan had released titled, "My Son, the Folksinger." The prior Tuesday (May 5, 1964) Allan Sherman had lunched with President Lyndon Johnson. When John asked him about the menu, he jokingly said that since he was on a diet, he could only have iced tea with no sugar. - Suzanne (2004)

        (2) PEASANT FASHION: Dorothy's pretty striped short-sleeved long dress incorporates a new style of neckline and sleeves for the 1960s. Dubbed the "peasant top" or "peasant blouse" or "peasant style," this style was used for tops and both long and short dresses. Raglan sleeves are connected to the bodice, and then gathered elastic is run through the neckline and sleeves, creating the "puffy" sleeve look that was very popular at this time. - Suzanne (2004)

        (3) BEATRICE LILLIE: At the time of this WML appearance, Beatrice Lillie was almost 70 years old and looked great. Bea promoted her Broadway musical "High Spirits," which was based upon "Blithe Spirit" by Noel Coward. Performed at the Alvin Theatre, her play ran for 375 total performances. This was to be her last staged musical. - Suzanne (2004)

      • Allan Sherman (11/30/1924 - 11/20/1973)

        Panel: Dorothy Kilgallen, Allan Sherman, Arlene Francis, Bennett Cerf.

    • ALLUSIONS (1)

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