What's My Line?

Season 16 Episode 1

EPISODE #729

0
Aired Daily 12:00 AM Sep 06, 1964 on CBS
10
out of 10
User Rating
2 votes
0

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

EDIT
EPISODE #729
AIRED:

Game 1: John Zavalopoulos (or maybe Zavalepoules) - "Sponge Diver" (self-employed; his handwriting was hard to decipher; the 1947 severe outbreak of red tide is mentioned as having killed the sponge beds; recovery took until 1957; from Tarpon Springs, FL)

Game 2: Miss Sheryl Slate - "Packs Popsicles" (salaried; this is a summer job until September when she will be an Ohio State College student; from Harrisburg, PA)

Game 3: Marty Allen (b. 3/23/1922) & Steve Rossi (5/25/1932 - 6/22/2014) (as Mystery Guest Duo) They signed in as "Hello Dere! Allen & Rossi"

Game 4: Bill Johnson - "Sells Fire Engines" (salaried; he works for American LaFrance Corp., Bill made sure Mr. Daly added, "the oldest and largest in the business"; from Huntington Station, Long Island, NY)
.
.

moreless

Who was the Episode MVP ?

Tuesday
No results found.
Wednesday
No results found.
Thursday
No results found.
SUBMIT REVIEW
    John Daly

    John Daly

    Moderator (1950-1967)

    Arlene Francis

    Arlene Francis

    Regular Panelist (1950-1967)

    Bennett Cerf

    Bennett Cerf

    Regular Panelist (1951-1967)

    Dorothy Kilgallen

    Dorothy Kilgallen

    Regular Panelist (1950-1965)

    Marty Allen

    Marty Allen

    Mystery Guest Duo

    Guest Star

    Steve Rossi

    Steve Rossi

    Mystery Guest Duo

    Guest Star

    Tony Randall

    Tony Randall

    Guest Panelist

    Guest Star

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

    FILTER BY TYPE

    • TRIVIA (0)

    • QUOTES (0)

    • NOTES (9)

      • FLIP REPORT: John flipped all the cards for the second contestant at eight down, even though Bennett had figured out that she was involved with popsicles. John flipped all the cards at six down for the final contestant because time ran out, although the panel had started getting close to determining his line. - agent_0042

      • (1) ONE OF YOUR LAST CHANCES TO "FEEL STRONGER": Tonight's episode was one of the final editions of "WML?" to be sponsored by Geritol, which is soon ending a run that dated back to EPISODE #633 of October 7, 1962. This leaves Kellogg's and a host of new sponsors to fill Geritol's gap. Kellogg's run will end around September of 1965, exceeding by one year Jules Montenier, Inc.'s 1950-1956 sponsorship of the program.
        (2) As with all prerecorded episodes that aired this summer, the opening words of announcer Johnny Olson's intro, "And now, from New York...", were recorded in real time, instead of through editing out the word "live" as had been done to the kinescope copies of 19 of the live editions of "WML?" from the 1963-1964 season, and would continue to be done on kinescopes of most live "WML?" shows over the next two years.
        (3) "WML?" END CREDITS WATCH: Time ran so short for the end credits which, while complete, were rushed, that Johnny Olson's announcement on where to send for free tickets to participate as a "WML?" studio audience member only listed CBS's address as "New York 10022," leaving out their then-address of 485 Madison Avenue. - W-B

      • As Allen & Rossi leave the set, John Daly realizes there is enough time left in the program for another game. As he closes the segment in anticipation of the commercial break, he says "We'll try a quick one after, uh, or another contestant, after this word from our alternate sponsor." He seems to unintentionally wink and then betrays a mischievous smile. The term "a quick one" was, in some quarters, alternately slang for either an alcoholic drink to be consumed rapidly (see http://www.gurunet.com) or for a hastily consummated sexual liaison. Indeed, in 1966, the British rock band The Who, in readying their album "A Quick One" for U.S. release, were forced by their record company to change its title due to the sexual overtones. - obbor

      • During the end credits, Johnny Olson announced that this episode was prerecorded. From Gil Fates' logs, we know this episode was taped on June 28, 1964. - Suzanne

        GET YOUR DATES RIGHT: One of the difficulties of recording a show in advance (as WML started doing during the summer seasons) was making it sound "current" when it was broadcast later in the season. Normally, the professional performers took this all in stride and the producers worried only about the amateurs - in this case - the contestants. However, tonight, both John and one of the contestants stumbled over the fact that the show was recorded in June 1964 but wouldn't be aired until September 6, 1964.

        It's Sunday night, June 28, and the studio audience has been briefed that the show they are about to watch is being prerecorded for broadcast on September 6. Arlene handles it well. In her introduction, she nonchalantly says, "And now, tomorrow being Labor Day..." The audience understands that the show will be broadcast on television in September, during the Labor Day holiday weekend, so her seemingly out-of-place comment doesn't draw any audience response.

        But John, in casual conversation, slips as he is introducing the Popsicle packer. He says, "Miss Slate is entering Ohio State University in September." However, he should have said "in a few days" instead of "in September." A moment later, he corrects himself - or tries to - by saying, "Actually, I guess I better straighten it out. It's not next September, it's THIS September you're going to Ohio State." Her game goes well, but at the end of the round, the young lady forgets that as far as the TV audience is concerned, "tonight" is in September, not June. John is still trying to smooth over his earlier gaffe when the following exchange takes place:

        Mr. Daly: "And you're going to Ohio State in a few days, I imagine?"

        Miss Slate (Her expression indicates SHE is confused): "No, I'm going..."

        Mr. Daly: "SEPTEMBER? Yes, sure!"

        Miss Slate (It finally dawn on her): "Yes."

        At this point, both the contestant and the studio audience realize that "tonight" IS September, and there is general laughter from the audience and the contestant at the "inside" joke. - Lee McIntyre

      • Allen & Rossi's first joke was the funniest one they told. It mentioned Henry Barnes, the NYC Traffic Commissioner. Henry was a previous WML contestant in February 1962, and will make another appearance in January 1966. Many of his traffic innovations are still in use today. For more information, see the notes to his Feb. 18, 1962 mystery guest appearance on EPISODE #602. Now to Allen & Rossi's joke! The "Hello, Dere" fictional phone call was to Henry Barnes. When Rossi asked "Henry" how he was going to fix New York's traffic problem, "Henry" said that he was going to make all the streets in town one-way streets heading West. When Rossi asked how that would help matters, "Henry" said he didn't care, it was now New Jersey's problem! On a future episode, Bennett tells this joke yet again. - Suzanne Astorino (2004)

      • Looking back, it is amazing how popular Allen and Rossi were! Marty Allen signed in as, "Hello, Dere!" I wonder if this WML guest appearance was the first time that Marty Allen jumped out of his crazy character? He answered a few questions in a more serious mode. Toward the end of their appearance, they performed a couple of their "Hello, Dere" joke routines. In one spoof of a question asked to the Democratic president Lyndon B. Johnson, Rossi asked Allen, "Do you know any elephant jokes?" Allen (as LBJ) replied, "The Republican Party." - ironcreekguy

      • Tidbits: During the sponge diver's sign-in, somebody yelled out something from the audience. It caught Mr. Daly's attention and he paused for a moment, then carried on. Arlene mentions that tomorrow (September 7th) is Labor Day. John Daly mentions having seen Allen & Rossi at "Banshee luncheons." I saw an online reference to the "Banshee Club" from 1954, having given a journalism award. - Suzanne (2004)

      • The secret word for the night was "bellibone." This archaic noun means "a woman excelling both in beauty and goodness; a fair maid" and it comes from the French words "belle et bonne." Of course, it refers to our very own Arlene Francis, and this is how Tony Randall introduced her. I'm sure she was flattered. Tony Randall was excellent as usual. However, the panel didn't guess the first contestant, and the second contestant made it all the way to the $40 mark before Bennett identified her line. As John Daly said, it was very fitting for Dorothy to guess that the mystery guests were Allen and Rossi, as she was one of the first to rave about their stand-up routine. The duo was very popular in the 1960s. Marty Allen was a frequent guest on numerous game shows during the 1960s and 1970s. As of 2004, Allen and Rossi still play several dates a year, especially in Las Vegas and Laughlin, Nevada. The panel ran out of time while questioning the final contestant from New York who sold fire engines. As a result, he won the full prize by default. - Sargebri (2004)

      • Panel: Dorothy Kilgallen, Tony Randall, Arlene Francis, Bennett Cerf.

    • ALLUSIONS (1)

    More
    Less