What's My Line?

Season 16 Episode 28

EPISODE #755

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Aired Daily 12:00 AM Mar 14, 1965 on CBS
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EPISODE #755
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Game 1: Mrs. Patsy T. Mink (12/6/1927 - 9/28/2002) (as Mystery Guest #1, but the panel was not blindfolded) - "U.S. Congresswoman" (from Honolulu, HI, Rep. Patsy Mink was Hawaii's Democrat member of the House of Representatives; she is also a lawyer; see notes below)

Game 2: Albert N. Brooks - "Makes Piggy Banks" (self-employed; he is the President of Brooks Creations, Inc., which Mr. Daly said is the largest maker of piggy banks in the U.S.; from Lincolnwood, IL)

Game 3: Anne Jackson, Eli Wallach, and Alan Arkin (as Mystery Guest Trio, their signatures were pre-signed on the board) - "Entire Cast of Broadway Hit LUV" (written by Murray Schisgal, this comedy play ran for 901 total performances)

Anne Jackson (b. 9/3/1925)
Eli Wallach (12/7/1915 - 6/24/2014)
Alan Arkin (b. 3/26/1934)

Game 4: Ron Rex - "Apprentice Chef at Waldorf Astoria Hotel" (salaried; this cute young chef was ending his second year of training and wished to make it his career; originally from Canton, OH, currently from NYC)
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SUBMIT REVIEW
    John Daly

    John Daly

    Moderator (1950-1967)

    Arlene Francis

    Arlene Francis

    Regular Panelist (1950-1967)

    Bennett Cerf

    Bennett Cerf

    Regular Panelist (1951-1967)

    Dorothy Kilgallen

    Dorothy Kilgallen

    Regular Panelist (1950-1965)

    Patsy Mink

    Patsy Mink

    Mystery Guest #1

    Guest Star

    Anne Jackson

    Anne Jackson

    Mystery Guest Trio

    Guest Star

    Eli Wallach

    Eli Wallach

    Mystery Guest Trio

    Guest Star

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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    • TRIVIA (0)

    • QUOTES (0)

    • NOTES (10)

      • REVIEW: Tonight was really one of those special nights, especially for Arlene. In fact, if it wasn't for Dorothy, Arlene would have had a one-woman perfecto. In the first game, the producers took a big chance by not blindfolding the panel, due to the fact that someone might have recognized Mrs. Patsy T. Mink of Honolulu, Hawaii. As it turned out, Bennett voluntarily disqualified himself because he recognized Mrs. Mink from her photo in the newspapers. However, the remaining panel still was able to figure out that she was an elected representative and it was Dorothy who correctly figured out that she was a member of the House of Representatives. Mrs. Mink would later gain fame (or infamy) for a little piece of legislation she helped to write. (More about that below.) In the second game, Arlene began her onslaught by correctly guessing that the contestant made piggy banks. She must have even amazed herself, because she displayed a big look of surprise when she made the winning guess. Arlene also did well in the mystery guest round as she was able to correctly identify the cast of the play "Luv" -- the husband and wife team of Eli Wallach and Anne Jackson along with their co-star Alan Arkin. Eli also took time to promote the film "Lord Jim," which was out at the same time. In the final game, Arlene completed the perfecto in impressive fashion as she correctly guessed that the contestant was a chef. What made it even more impressive was the fact that the panel only had a limited amount of time to make the identification. That helped to make this one of the most successful nights in the history of the panel. - Sargebri (2006)

        HAWAII: Interestingly, Patsy Mink was not the only famous politician to come from the 50th state. Senator Daniel Inouye would later become famous as chairman of the Iran-Contra hearings in 1986. - Sargebri (2006)

        STAR TREK: It was ironic that this WML episode with William Shatner on the panel was shown on GSN in November, 2006. At the same time, the TV Land network was airing a marathon of the show that made Bill a household name, "Star Trek," to celebrate the occasion of "Star Trek" moving to TV Land. - Sargebri (2006)

        HAPPY UNION: At the time of their appearance on the show, Eli Wallach and Anne Jackson had just celebrated their 17th wedding anniversary. In fact, the couple has one of the most successful marriages in show business. As of this writing in November 2006, they have been married an incredible 58 years. - Sargebri (2006)

      • SET PHASERS TO FLIP: John flipped all the cards for the first contestant at three down. Arlene had narrowed the position to "senator" or "representative" before the cards were flipped and got a "no" on senator. He flipped all the cards for the final contestant at five down. Arlene had guessed that he was a chef after zoning in on his use of equipment. - agent_0042 (2006)

      • A WARP IN THE SPACE/TIME CONTINUUM: John Daly must have been phasing out of space-time briefly during the mystery challenger segment. When Bennett was given a "no" answer to his question about whether what the guests were appearing in could be "broadly called a comedy," John did not flip a card. He later realized his mistake and flipped two cards after another no was given. - agent_0042 (2006)

      • (1) "LIVE" WATCH: Once again, for the 41st time amongst those "WML?" episodes still in existence, the word "live" is cut from the kinescope copy of tonight's live broadcast.
        (2) A PORTENT OF THINGS TO COME: As with the occasional "WML?" episodes where Arlene Francis sat in the anchor position of the panel desk, tonight's episode pointed another hint at the future, as all overlay screens were set in News Gothic Bold - which would be the overlay font on the 1968-1975 syndicated incarnation of "WML?" In just one example, the first overlay for the mystery guests - "Entire Cast of Broadway Hit LUV" - was even set in such a layout that would later be used on the syndicated show itself for mystery guests appearing in a Broadway play or new movie. This was not the first time News Gothic Bold was used on the classic CBS "WML?", however, as the typeface had also been used for mystery guest Groucho Marx's overlay screen on EPISODE #684 of October 13, 1963.
        (3) "BEST TO YOU" - TWICE: After GSN's airing of tonight's show on November 20, 2006, the channel immediately aired EPISODE #722 of July 19, 1964, as a tribute to that night's mystery guest, Jack Palance, who died on November 10, 2006. Both episodes were coincidentally sponsored by Kellogg's. - W-B (2006)

      • Shatner is much more subdued on this episode, his second and final WML appearance. His new series, "For the People" had most likely been cancelled by now. Dorothy made no mention of it in his introduction. She referred to him as "a dashing young actor," yet he was almost 34 years old at this time! When introducing Arlene, Shatner humorously declares his lust for Miss Francis, and proceeds to drape his arm around her chair for the entire show! (Watch out, Martin!) It's too bad Shatner hadn't waited and appeared on WML a few weeks later. Then, he could have plugged this weird science-fiction pilot he was about to shoot out in Hollywood called (you guessed it!) "Star Trek"! - exapno99

      • REVIEW: "A big oops" would describe the beginning of this episode. There must have been a debate on whether or not to blindfold the panel before Representative Patsy Mink walked on the stage. Unfortunately, it was deemed unnecessary. Bennett started off the questioning by asking Patsy if she were an elected official from the state of Hawaii. When she replied "yes," he disqualified himself, but the cat had already been let out of the bag. He later admitted that he recognized her from her photograph in the newspaper. Arlene was really the hot one tonight. She managed to guess the piggy bank maker and she also was able to guess the apprentice chef. Guessing the chef was a remarkable feat, because the panel was rushing and asking questions at a fevered pitch. The show was almost over and they were out of time. Yet, Arlene managed to come up with his occupation! After the mystery guest round, it was mentioned that Eli Wallach played a particularly despicable character in the film "Lord Jim." Wallach would make a career of playing lowlife villains, especially in a film that would come out the next year, "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly," in which he co-starred with Clint Eastwood and Lee Van Cleef. He also had a comic turn in an episode of Batman in which he played "Mr. Freeze." He was the third and final actor to play that role in the television series. (The other two actors had been George Sanders and Otto Preminger.) Alan Arkin also has had a long and distinguished career in films. In the coming year, Arkin would appear in the 1966 film "The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming." In 1967, he too would play a despicable character, the knife-happy "Roat" in "Wait Until Dark." He is the father of actors Adam Arkin, Matthew Arkin and Anthony Arkin. - Sargebri (2004)

        REP MINK: Patsy Mink was the first Japanese-American woman to be elected to Congress. In 1972, Representative Mink was one of those responsible for the passage of one of the most important, and controversial, pieces of legislation in history. The law she helped pass in Congress, Title IX of the Education Act Amendments of 1972, helped to ensure equality in federally-funded schools at the college level, especially in athletics. Because of this legislation which she co-authored, the rise in women's collegiate sports began. Within 25 years, most of the major universities around the country had a women's sports program. - Sargebri (2004)

      • Eli Wallach and Ann Jackson are husband and wife. They were married on March 5, 1948. Their three children are the actors Peter Wallach, Katherine Wallach and Roberta Wallach. - Suzanne (2004)

      • Arlene asked the children's bank maker why the coin banks were called "piggy banks." John explained that in earlier years, the popular banks were made in the shape of pigs. Here is another more thorough explanation: Piggy banks weren't named after pigs, but rather, after a kind of dense orange clay or earthenware called pygg. Pygg is a word from the Old English language. During the Middle Ages, in about the fifteenth century, metal was expensive in medieval England and seldom used for household wares. Instead, dishes and pots were made of an economical clay called pygg. Whenever family members could save an extra coin, they dropped it into one of their clay jars, their "pygg bank." In time over the centuries, the banks were often made in the shape of pigs. Maybe the first potter who thought to create this "visual pun" was related to Bennett Cerf! - Suzanne (2004)

      • Tidbits: Bennett has returned from his vacation in Caneel Bay, St. John, Virgin Islands, looking very tan!

      • Panel: Dorothy Kilgallen, William Shatner, Arlene Francis, Bennett Cerf.

    • ALLUSIONS (1)

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