What's My Line?

Season 18 Episode 53


Aired Daily 12:00 AM Sep 03, 1967 on CBS



  • Notes

    • LIFE AFTER "LINE" - Even though everyone thinks first of the most frequent panelists, Arlene, Martin, Bennett and Dorothy, here is a brief look at what some of the more popular guest panelists did after the show went off the air. - Sargebri (2004)

      The Guys:

      • Tony Randall - The second most prolific guest panelist in the history of WML, with 63 panel appearances and 3 mystery guest appearances. He was a great game player and always had fun, even when he got his usual "no" answers. Three years after the show's cancellation, Tony would take on the role that he would become the most identified with, neat freak "Felix Unger" on the classic 1970s sitcom "The Odd Couple." Tony would also become a frequent guest on "The Late Show with David Letterman," and would continue to act and appear in various Broadway productions until his death in 2004.

      • Robert Q. Lewis - With 42 panel appearances and 1 mystery guest appearance, RQL was the third most prolific guest panelist in the history of WML. He was an excellent serious game player, with the majority of his appearances occurring in the 1950s. Having started out as a child actor, his acting career continued until his 1991 death.

      • Joey Bishop - With 22 panel appearances, 3 mystery guest appearances and one cameo appearance, Joey brought a lot of fun to the panel. His low-key, deadpan humor made him very popular. He would continue to appear on various television series and game shows throughout the 1970s and 1980s. He holds the record for most guest-hosting performances on "The Tonight Show," with 177 appearances. He also is the last surviving member of the "Rat Pack" and as of 2004 is currently is living in semi-retirement in Los Angeles.

      • Buddy Hackett - With 15 panel appearances and 5 mystery guest appearances, Buddy also added a lot of fun. His crazy persona would make him one of the more popular guests to ever grace the panel. He would continue to act and perform his stand-up comedy routine until his death in 2003. His last appearance would be on the reality show "Last Comic Standing" as one of the talent scouts.

      • Ernie Kovacs - With 10 panel appearances and 2 mystery guest appearances, Ernie remains a favorite panelist of the 1950s. His zany humor was ground-breaking for its time. He married Edie Adams in 1954. His acting career continued until his 1962 auto accident death. The epitaph on his tombstone reads "Nothing In Moderation."

      The Gals:

      • Phyllis Newman - The most prolific of all the female guest panelists, with 34 panel appearances and unfortunately no mystery guest appearances. She emerged at a crucial time in the show's history when she began appearing after Dorothy's death. She not only was one of the smartest panelists to ever grace the show, she also brought a youthful enthusiasm that was missing from the show. She made history a few years after WML went off the air when she became the first woman to guest host "The Tonight Show." She also is a breast cancer survivor and she continues to act and sing to this day in 2004, and most recently appeared in the 2003 film "The Human Stain." She also began a second career as a make-up artist. She was married to former WML guest panelist and mystery guest Adolph Green until his death in 2002. They have two children, Amanda Green and Adam Green.

      • Aileen Mehle (aka Suzy Knickerbocker) - With 10 panel appearances and 1 mystery guest appearance, Suzy made the biggest splash when she debuted on the panel in January 1966. She was a very intelligent panelist who asked good questions. Along with Phyllis, she was among the top candidates to replace Dorothy after Dorothy's untimely death. As of 2004, Suzy continues to write and make her rounds in the New York social scene. After the closing of the "New York Journal-American" and the "New York World Journal Tribune," she would go on to write for such periodicals as "Women's Wear Daily" and "W Magazine."

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