What's My Line? Forums

CBS (ended 1967)

Arlene on Match Game

  • Avatar of cattaur

    cattaur

    [1]Feb 2, 2007
    • member since: 12/29/05
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    I happened to be up, and had GSN on.

    Arlene Francis is on the 2nd episode of Match Game 75 tonight.

    Vik-Thor
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  • Avatar of stopettearoma

    stopettearoma

    [2]Feb 7, 2007
    • member since: 11/23/06
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    cattaur wrote:
    I happened to be up, and had GSN on.

    Arlene Francis is on the 2nd episode of Match Game 75 tonight.

    Vik-Thor

    Did anyone notice that during the goodbyes at the end of the episode, Gene Rayburn asked Arlene how New York was doing, and she referred quickly to the financial crisis then happening ?  

    People who've never lived in New York City forget this, but in the fall of 1975, the city's bankruptcy was the biggest news story.  It was bigger than the prosecution of Squeaky Fromme and Sara Jane Moore for trying to kill President Ford and it was bigger than a new TV show that was reviving live TV entertainment in New York for the first time since CBS axed What's My Line eight years ago.  That new TV show was "NBC's Saturday Night" with host George Carlin and the Not Ready For Prime Time Players.  If only Arlene had hosted it!

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  • Avatar of W-B

    W-B

    [3]Feb 7, 2007
    • member since: 06/14/05
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    And the funny thing was, that this new show - which became Saturday Night Live in 1977 - was based in the same studio - 8H - where many of the last four seasons' worth of syndicated WML? episodes were taped (as noted in some guides).
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  • Avatar of stopettearoma

    stopettearoma

    [4]Feb 10, 2007
    • member since: 11/23/06
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    W-B wrote:
    And the funny thing was, that this new show - which became Saturday Night Live in 1977 - was based in the same studio - 8H - where many of the last four seasons' worth of syndicated WML? episodes were taped (as noted in some guides).
    Yes, but that fact never surfaced in the newspaper and magazine coverage of Saturday Night Live during its first five seasons with Gilda Radner, Jane Curtin and Garrett Morris.  Many A-List publications, including the New Yorker and Tom Shales' reviews in the Washington Post, pointed out that the SNL regulars had inherited the workplace of Arturo Toscanini and his NBC radio / TV orchestra of the 1940s / 1950s.  But the fact that What's My Line had used it just ten months before SNL never got publicized until web sites sprouted just a few years ago. 

    Maybe the reason the SNL critics ignored the WML connection is that a live broadcast made the studio a thousand times more interesting.  A tape delay of weeks or months for syndication seems to take the zest out of the studio, especially for New Yorkers whose approach to entertainment is very timely and always was timely. Toscanini and his orchestra aired live, and Saturday Night Live aired live, and that's what stood out as New Yorkers gave Rockefeller Center the once-over.

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  • Avatar of TVGord

    TVGord

    [5]Feb 11, 2007
    • member since: 06/16/05
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    As much as I love WML, I think the reason it wasn't mentioned in the same breath as SNL was that SNL was a hip, new show, and you couldn't get "unhipper" than WML in 1975!  After all, the reason WML was cancelled in 1967 was because its audience had grown too old, and its replacement (Mission: Impossible) was a much cooler show.  By the time SNL hit the airwaves, WML was even "unhipper" (who knew that pseudo-word could be used twice in one post!?  lol), because its syndicated version was not only catering to an unappealing demographic, it was also without the air of class that the CBS version had. 

    Accuracy aside, SNL was billing itself as a new form of television, and reporters of television news were only too happy to buy into the hipness.  I believe the writers themselves would have felt out of touch had they brought up WML in their stories. 

    With the benefit of hindsight, a good argument could be made that SNL is now the stodgy, unhip show, while WML's historical perspective has given it a sense of neo-hipness.  Of course, don't take my word for it; I'm still waiting for my bell-bottoms and love beads to come back in style!  ;-) 

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