What's My Line? Forums

CBS (ended 1967)

DOROTHY KILGALLEN Forum

  • Avatar of Fat-tote-bag

    Fat-tote-bag

    [21]Nov 12, 2005
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    The1Factotum1i1 wrote:
    King features didn't keep such short-shelf life things as topical columns and editorial cartoons, etc. But if you have access to microfilm via your local library, you can find Her stuff in a Hearst paper,(Some cities had two) or subscribing client paper. The work will be in finding that certain paper. Taking out a test reel from the period you're interested in of all the available titles and go gold panning. If it didn't show up in your city, inter-library loans have always been a boon to me. The New York Journal-American will have her VOICE OF BROADWAY column covering her WML? years.The New York Public Library or the Library of Congress can help.


    No, an old Hearst paper isn't the only place where you can find her column. It ran in the Washington Post, Arizona Republic, the Columbus Evening Dispatch and the New Orleans States Item. The latter is not in the Library of Congress -- better skip that paper for a while.

    If you revealed the city in which you live, I could tell you where the nearest repository of the Voice of Broadway is. I understand if you won't reveal that in view of the presence of some disturbed characters here.
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  • Avatar of astorino

    astorino

    [22]Nov 12, 2005
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    wieniekilgallen wrote:
    Does anyone know where to obtain Dorothy's old columns?


    You can read a few of them online at the "Freedom of Information Act" web site.

    jimarnone had a post in our old DK forum which is now gone with the wind, but snippets of it still live on in Google's cache. I'll copy over his previous post for you.
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  • Avatar of astorino

    astorino

    [23]Nov 12, 2005
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    REPOST

    From: jimarnone

    Re: Dorothy Kilgallen Forum | 06/29/2005

    I stumbled into a fascinating website which contains correspondence, notes, newspaper clippings and other information collected by the Federal Bureau of Investigation on Dorothy Kilgallen from March 1939 through October 1964. There are over 200 pages of data contained within eight PDF files. The FBI released these files to the public under the Freedom of Information Act.

    It is obvious throughout these documents that the FBI does not believe Dorothy is a credible source of information, but yet they continue to read and react to article after article written in her "The Voice Of Broadway" syndicated column.

    The correspondence is made up of letters written between Dorothy, J. Edgar Hoover, Walter Winchell, FBI agents, and many others. It makes very interesting reading.

    Perhaps the most interesting content is the material involving JFK's assassination and the Warren Commission. Somehow Dorothy obtained a copy of the Warren Commission report more than a month before it was officially given to President Johnson. Her newspaper ran a story giving a word for word account of Jack Ruby’s testimony before Chief Justice Warren and representatives of the President’s Commission at the Dallas County Jail on June 7, 1964. The FBI interviewed Dorothy three days after this story was published where she steadfastly refused to reveal her source. The FBI report of this interview begins:

    ----- Excerpt from PDF file 7 of 8 : pages 18 & 19 -----

    The following investigation was conducted by Special Agents (blank) and (blank) at New York, New York:

    DOROTHY KILGALLEN was interviewed on August 21, 1964 at her Town House located at 45 East 68th Street, New York, New York.

    Miss KILGALLEN stated that she refused to reveal the source who gave her the transcript of the JACK RUBY interview by the President's Commission on the Assassination of President KENNEDY.

    Miss KILGALLEN stated that she would identify the source only as a "responsible person who had a legal right to the transcript." She stated that she was the only person who knew the identity of the source and that she "would die" rather than reveal his identity. Miss KILGALLEN said that she based her refusal to identify her source on the right of a newspaper reporter to protect his sources of information.

    --- end of excerpt ---

    Dorothy Kilgallen died 15 months later.

    ---

    This web page can be found at:

    Freedom of Information Act - Federal Bureau of Investigation

    http://foia.fbi.gov/foiaindex/dorothykilgallen.htm

    In addition to the links to the eight PDF files, this web page contains the following text:

    -------

    DOROTHY KILGALLEN

    Dorothy Kilgallen was newspaper reporter for the New York Journal-American. She reported on the entertainment news with her column called "The Voice of Broadway." Ms. Kilgallen and Director Hoover corresponded with each other. Miss Kilgallen printed information in her column several times about cases involving the FBI, none of which were true. Dorothy Kilgallen died in November 1965, from alcohol and barbiturates.

    END OF REPOST
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  • Avatar of astorino

    astorino

    [24]Nov 12, 2005
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    The PDF files are large. The 8 files are between 4 and 5 megs each, totaling 35 megabytes.
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    dad1153

    [27]Nov 14, 2005
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    If alcohol were an impediment to great writing then Ernest Hemingway would have only written crap, which is hardly the case. Alcoholics (particularly serial alcoholics) are good at compartmentalizing their tasks and lives in order to accomodate the buzz of heavy/routine drinking, which for most drinking folks it's just a glass of wine after dinner or a beer during the game. It's when the need for booze takes over that everything else falls apart and pills, drugs and other vices kick in. Kilgallen's failure to reign in her demons took years to come into full view of the public (via the subtle signals her writing and kinescoped appearances send), but even then she seemed capable of leading a duplitious lifestyle until her body gave way. Shame!
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  • Avatar of lovewml

    lovewml

    [28]Nov 14, 2005
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    Maybe I'm not very observant, but I don't detect any obvious signs of DK's dependance problems in the currently shown 1960 season.
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    Stopette

    [29]Nov 14, 2005
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    dad1153 wrote:
    If alcohol were an impediment to great writing then Ernest Hemingway would have only written crap, which is hardly the case. Alcoholics (particularly serial alcoholics) are good at compartmentalizing their tasks and lives in order to accomodate the buzz of heavy/routine drinking, which for most drinking folks it's just a glass of wine after dinner or a beer during the game. It's when the need for booze takes over that everything else falls apart and pills, drugs and other vices kick in. Kilgallen's failure to reign in her demons took years to come into full view of the public (via the subtle signals her writing and kinescoped appearances send), but even then she seemed capable of leading a duplitious lifestyle until her body gave way. Shame!


    Can you cite any of the writing she did late in her life that demonstrates "failure to reign in her demons?"

    As for Dorothy's kinescoped appearances, they indicate that she was under a lot of stress when she fulfilled her commitment to What's My Line. It was just one of her many commitments, but it was the one that reached the most people and the only one that survives after her death. All her writing is preserved on microfilm and in an office building in Lincoln Center in Manhattan, but very few people are willing to go there. The majority wants to sit at home using a remote control, and what they get from it is a distortion that they consider to be a thorough chronicle of 15 - 17 years in the lives of four people.

    In the case of John Daly, the WML kinescopes make certain people forget that he delivered a news broadcast every night for seven years. He informed millions of people of tragic events like the prosecution of the murderers of a young black man named Emmett Till who made a fatal visit to his cousins in Mississippi, where they do things a little different than in Mr. Till's hometown in Illinois.

    But nobody connects John Daly with that tragic news today. They go with the kinescopes they get, and they think those kinescopes are the be - all and end - all. Same with Dorothy: her father Jimmy traveled to Mississippi in 1955 to cover the Till trial, but who in the GSN audience cares about that today? They go with what they get, and they think they're getting everything.
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    agent_0042

    [30]Nov 24, 2005
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    If I may ask a question --- was Dorothy a bit hard-of-hearing? It seems like whenever there's a mystery guest and there's confusion on whether an answer given was "yes" or "no," it's always Dorothy that asks. Doesn't she hear John say "such and such down, such and such to go?"
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    sixtyfivealive

    [31]Nov 25, 2005
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    agent_0042 wrote:
    If I may ask a question --- was Dorothy a bit hard-of-hearing? It seems like whenever there's a mystery guest and there's confusion on whether an answer given was "yes" or "no," it's always Dorothy that asks. Doesn't she hear John say "such and such down, such and such to go?"


    Don't know, but I have noticed times when she either is daydreaming or doesn't hear something. In a recently shown episode John says "Good Night Dorothy" and her response was "Oh did you say Good Night John?"
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    W-B

    [32]Dec 8, 2005
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    I'm not too sure, but it sounds like one explanation could be all those years in nightclubs where sometimes loud music can be heard (i.e. trumpeters hitting high notes) . . . that's what I'm guessing, anyway . . .
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  • Avatar of billsav57

    billsav57

    [35]Dec 10, 2005
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    I've been trying to make that point for some time ... that the WML people all had lives that we can't see on the GSN reruns, and that WML was something they did on the side on a Sunday night.
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  • Avatar of billsav57

    billsav57

    [37]Dec 10, 2005
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    One more thing ... Did anyone get what Dorothy kept chiding Tony Randall about the other night during the session with the hog auctioneer? She kept telling him something wasn't funny. She was just acting weird overall, as many have observed.
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    Linneman

    [40]Dec 11, 2005
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    Dorothy has been asking mystery guests recently if they've had training in dentistry. Clearly she's expecting Casey Stengel, the longtime manager of the Yankees and later Mets, to be on the show. He trained as a dentist back in Kansas City. On either the Carl Sandberg/Milton Berle episode (#530) aired early Friday or the Cantinflas show (#531) aired Saturday Bennett said good night to both John and Casey Stengel, teasing Dorothy a bit. (And I am not near my tapes to check which one, sorry)

    That Sandberg and Berle were on the same show says a great deal about why many of us find WML fascinating.
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