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CBS (ended 1967)

Ernie Kovacs Forum

  • Avatar of W-B

    W-B

    [61]Dec 7, 2005
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    Another favorite Kovacs' routine of mine was his "Pierre Ragout" retelling of (I.I.N.M.) "The Princess and the Pea"; alas, all I remember of that is the ending punchline, "And to this day, no one believes her."
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    astorino

    [62]Dec 8, 2005
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    I always think of Ernie every time Dorothy asks, "Can this product be folded?"
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    astorino

    [63]Jan 7, 2006
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    It's sad enough that Ernie died in a car accident on January 13, 1962 - but it's almost unbelievable that both of his daughters died in auto accidents also. Per IMDB: Daughter Kippie Kovacs died in an auto accident on July 28, 2001. Daughter actress Mia Kovacs died in an auto accident on May 8, 1982.
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    mehitable

    [64]Jan 7, 2006
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    It's so sad. On findagrave.com, there's a photo with arrows pointing to all three graves.
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  • Avatar of W-B

    W-B

    [65]Feb 7, 2006
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    On the "Mr. Question Man" sketches, Mr. Kovacs' straight man was Bill Wendell - the same Bill Wendell who, until about a decade ago, was the announcer for David Letterman's show. And unless I'm mistaken, didn't Letterman, in his NBC Late Night days (1982-1993) cite Kovacs as one of his influences?
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    The1Factotum1i1

    [66]Feb 7, 2006
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    He might have, but i think a lot of modern day comics will cite somebody like Kovacs as "an influence" without any being present, just to put themselves in the same class.
    I recall "Laugh-In" pretending they were going to be sued by the estate of EK for stealing his material. That really stuck in my craw. Did you know I had a craw? That was was such a patheticly cutsey sex-obsessed mishmash it had nothing in common with Kovacs except they were on TV.
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  • Avatar of W-B

    W-B

    [67]Jul 2, 2007
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    The1Factotum1i1 wrote:
    He might have, but i think a lot of modern day comics will cite somebody like Kovacs as "an influence" without any being present, just to put themselves in the same class. I recall "Laugh-In" pretending they were going to be sued by the estate of EK for stealing his material. That really stuck in my craw. Did you know I had a craw? That was was such a patheticly cutsey sex-obsessed mishmash it had nothing in common with Kovacs except they were on TV.

    There was a peripheral - but only peripheral, mind you - connection between Kovacs and Laugh-In: Jolene Brand, who was part of Kovacs' "stock company" in his 1961-62 ABC specials (and presumably, Take a Good Look) is the wife of George Schlatter who was one of Laugh-In's executive producers. But that's pretty much the extent of it. Otherwise, this observation's pretty much on the money.
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    TVGord

    [68]Jul 8, 2007
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    W-B wrote:
    ...unless I'm mistaken, didn't Letterman, in his NBC Late Night days (1982-1993) cite Kovacs as one of his influences?

    Nope, "you are correct sir"! ;-) (That was my Ed McMahon impersonation.)

    Although Dave clearly idolized Johnny Carson, he has acknowledged that his style of comedy has borrowed elements from both Ernie Kovacs and Steve Allen. He seems to have veered off into his own style in recent years, but some of those earlier bits of Dave's from back in the NBC days owe a great deal to the pioneers who went before him. To his credit, he never shied away from giving thanks to them, either.

    Edited on 07/08/2007 1:10pm
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