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CBS (ended 1967)

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  • Avatar of Stopette

    Stopette

    [41]Jan 20, 2006
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    The1Factotum1i1 wrote:
    Well, the Linda Ellerbee and Jessica Savitch story was very informative. And it made it's point so elegantly, didn't it?
    And the important lesson about kindness. You're such an authority on kindness. I'm sure all who get through your last message will avoid complaining about foul language to cafeteria workers, especially if they are 30-something teachers. Who wants to look "mentally troubled" to Cafeteria workers, especially? They might short change your pudding!
    I don't think I'd want a mental-health counsellor at the hospital in Elgin, Illinois. What other towns do you have?
    Please keep it. It's good entertainment for us, and great therapy for you.


    Sorry, you aren't backing up your use of "us" with any evidence. Nobody else has reacted to my observations. "ymike673" and other sane people remain silent on the issue of whether the U. S. Copyright office has received something of value since 1970. Therefore, I'm leaving.

    Why should I provide "entertainment" to one invisible person ? I get along well with people outside of tv.com who have created things since 1970. I like these people because they're my species.
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  • Avatar of W-B

    W-B

    [42]Jan 22, 2006
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    The1Factotum1i1 wrote:
    You mean BOB HOPE CHRYSLER THEATRE? this was a 1963 anthology series,where Bob did occasional alleged comedy stories. Nothing to write home about.

    Mr. Hope also did his customary hour-long comedy/variety special fare which, during the 1960's period, was called Chrysler Presents A Bob Hope Special.
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    The1Factotum1i1

    [43]Jan 22, 2006
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    Actually, I think what you're referring to is the same series. I've noticed print listings can differ in the title. The show was seen once a month, so I guess it could be classified as a "special". More famous of course, were his many comedy specials sponsored by Texaco over the years.
    I loved Bob Hope, and anxiously awaited his next specials, but eventually, some time after the Viet Nam tours, he seemed to lose something. The gags and (rehearsed) ad libs were of the same calibre, but his delivery, or timing, if you will, evaporated. The public persona he tried to project, was an ever young, smart alecky guy who always seemed to have girls on his mind, though was more pussycat than tiger.
    He maintained this aura of youthful vigor right into his 70's, which is a tribute to his acting talent, but he finally lost that gift and he became embarrassingly rather more like a dirty old man. Surrounding himself with talents like Brooke Shields, and playing parts in skits intended for a 25-year old only accentuated this unintended impression.
    Edited on 01/22/2006 6:42pm
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  • Avatar of ymike673

    ymike673

    [44]Jan 23, 2006
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    I agree. It seems like the only old comedian who kept it together far into his old age was George Burns. Even seeing him perform when he was in his early ninties he still remained funny.
    Edited on 07/10/2006 10:45pm
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  • Avatar of The1Factotum1i1

    The1Factotum1i1

    [45]Jan 25, 2006
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    Perhaps a little humilty could've helped Bob. In younger days, he's always a bit egotistical in his routines, and of course, half the fun is seeing him get embarrassed or somehow given comeuppance (for a while) because of it, but all in a good natured, lighthearted way.
    But as a creaky old man, it's a different story. Burns and for the last 9 years of his life, Jack Benny would play their routines out AS old men, making fun of their obvious changed status. Why not? even Jack's famous decades-on running gag of being 39 forever was dumped by him after he lost his weekly series. He had outgrown it and would even say things like, "I'm so sick of that, you know I'm 75 years old last February."
    Bob I guess didn't want to come to grips with his mortality, and wanted to be the evergreen man , I guess.
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  • Avatar of billsav57

    billsav57

    [46]Jan 25, 2006
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    Just before he died, Jack Benny had done a pretty clever "farewell special" where he spent the whole show trying to tell people -- including Ronald Reagan -- that he really wasn't going away, that it was just his "first" farewell special. That, and the fact that he was getting ready to do "The Sunshine Boys" when he died suggests to me that he probably could have kept things going pretty well, the way his friend George Burns did. Could he have gone as long as Burns? Probably. Benny was the greater talent -- although Burns supposedly could crack him up in a second.
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  • Avatar of ymike673

    ymike673

    [47]Jan 26, 2006
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    I believe Jack's second "Farewell Special" had already been scheduled by NBC when he passed away. He was also funny throughout his entire career. Had he been able to appear in the Sunshine Boys I wonder if he would have recieved an Oscar for his role like George Burns did?
    Edited on 07/10/2006 10:46pm
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  • Avatar of W-B

    W-B

    [48]Jan 26, 2006
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    ymike673 wrote:
    billsav57 wrote:
    Just before he died, Jack Benny had done a pretty clever "farewell special" where he spent the whole show trying to tell people -- including Ronald Reagan -- that he really wasn't going away, that it was just his "first" farewell special. That, and the fact that he was getting ready to do "The Sunshine Boys" when he died suggests to me that he probably could have kept things going pretty well, the way his friend George Burns did. Could he have gone as long as Burns? Probably. Benny was the greater talent -- although Burns supposedly could crack him up in a second.

    I believe Jack's second "Farewell Special" had already been scheduled by NBC when he passed away. He was also funny throughout his entire career. Had he been able to appear in the Sunshine Boys I wonder if he would have recieved an Oscar for his role like George Burns did?

    Actually, Mr. Benny did two "Farewell Specials" - the first in 1973, the second in early 1974. And the latter of the two proved eerily prophetic, as it turned out to be his final "farewell special," given his death towards the end of the year. Among the guests of this second "farewell" special were Jack Webb and Harry Morgan (the former appearing as Sgt. Joe Friday for what turned out to be the last time, the latter in his Dragnet 1967/68/69/70 role as Officer Bill Gannon), and The DeFranco Family who performed their big hit "Heartbeat - It's A Lovebeat." Oh yes, and George Burns. The sponsor was RCA XL-100 color TV's.
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  • Avatar of ymike673

    ymike673

    [49]Jan 26, 2006
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    My mistake. In fact I remember making an audio recording of that show.(No VCRs back then) I think that was the DeFranco Family's only hit recording. I believe there was a third "Farewell Special" in the works when Benny passed away.
    Edited on 07/10/2006 10:47pm
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  • Avatar of The1Factotum1i1

    The1Factotum1i1

    [50]Jan 26, 2006
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    That's true. It was going to become an annual tradition, to give Jack at least once-a-year exposure. Though he was in his 70's, he really didn't retire, and it seemed "suddenly" at least to me. At the time, his film TV series had just been dusted off earlier in 1974, and was available for syndication, so I was seeing a lot of them for the first time since they were first run, or on in CBS's morning reruns. My local paper ran the story with the heading "Death comes to Jack Benny, 39".

    (THIS IS MY 1000th POSTING! Celebrate quietly, please.)
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  • Avatar of ymike673

    ymike673

    [51]Jan 27, 2006
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    CBS actually played some of the filmed episodes in Prime Time as a tribute to Jack when he passed away.
    Edited on 07/10/2006 10:48pm
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  • Avatar of The1Factotum1i1

    The1Factotum1i1

    [52]Jan 27, 2006
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    They also did, strangely enough, run four episodes again in prime time during summer repeats season in 1977.
    This I thought was rather like admitting there wasn't anything worthwhile putting on from any recent, or for that matter, LIVING stars.
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  • Avatar of ymike673

    ymike673

    [53]Jan 27, 2006
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    Too bad CBS could not repeat Jack's live shows. They were always funnier than the filmed ones.
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  • Avatar of billsav57

    billsav57

    [54]Jan 27, 2006
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    What I remember most is Reagan appearing on the first "farewell" special. He was governor of California at the time and he gave Jack all sorts of retirement gifts, and Jack was having a hard time trying to bring himself to say that he really wasn't going away for good, lest he have to give the gifts back.
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  • Avatar of The1Factotum1i1

    The1Factotum1i1

    [55]Jan 31, 2006
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    ymike673 wrote:
    Too bad CBS could not repeat Jack's live shows. They were always funnier than the filmed ones.


    The networks never reran kinescope stuff, nor put any into syndication. There was a snobbish tunnel vision about picture quality; no matter how good a once-live series was, it could never be as presentable as something on film.
    If you grew up after the that era, you could see the 1950's and early 60's in terms of drek like DECEMBER BRIDE and I MARRIED JOAN, and never know about Ernie Kovacs or Sid Caesar, or the great anthologies like THE ALCOA HOUR or PLAYHOUSE 90 that made tv great. Kids have no idea why it was called "The Golden Age of Television". Why would they? Most of the greatness was on Kinescope.
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  • Avatar of ymike673

    ymike673

    [56]Jan 31, 2006
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    Thankfuly because of home video and places like the Museum of Radio & TV its possible to see the great "Live" shows of the 1950's. I was too young to remember seeing those shows when they were originally broadcast. I do remember some of the "live" shows of the early 1960's.
    Edited on 07/10/2006 10:49pm
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  • Avatar of billsav57

    billsav57

    [57]Jan 31, 2006
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    The networks did used to show reruns -- of sitcoms, though -- during the day. "I Love Lucy" reruns were always on in the 1960s on CBS, and I remember that NBC was running a "Bachelor Father" rerun when the news broke of the JFK assassination.
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  • Avatar of ymike673

    ymike673

    [58]Feb 1, 2006
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    billsav57 wrote:
    The networks did used to show reruns -- of sitcoms, though -- during the day. "I Love Lucy" reruns were always on in the 1960s on CBS, and I remember that NBC was running a "Bachelor Father" rerun when the news broke of the JFK assassination.


    Yes, the networks did rerun old sitcoms but all the shows you mentioned were filmed shows. Kinescopes were never reaired by the networks.
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  • Avatar of The1Factotum1i1

    The1Factotum1i1

    [59]Feb 1, 2006
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    billsav57 wrote:
    The networks did used to show reruns -- of sitcoms, though -- during the day. "I Love Lucy" reruns were always on in the 1960s on CBS, and I remember that NBC was running a "Bachelor Father" rerun when the news broke of the JFK assassination.


    The BACHELOR FATHER rerun could have been only what Channel 4 in New York was running. That time of day, many affiliates had that time for local programming, or their own syndicated reruns to offer for local advertising. NBC could have offered BF at that time for stations that had nothing of their own, but stronger affiliates in major cities usually took the option of using it themselves.
    Edited on 02/01/2006 8:49am
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  • Avatar of ymike673

    ymike673

    [60]Feb 1, 2006
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    In the mid 1960's WCBS TV in NY would air repeats of the Dick Van Dyke Show in the morning. These would be announced as "The Dick Van Dyke Daytime Show".
    Edited on 07/10/2006 10:50pm
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