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CBS (ended 1967)

JOHN DALY Forum

  • Avatar of W-B

    W-B

    [61]Jan 4, 2006
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    billsav57 wrote:
    Whatever your feelings on John Daly, you have to admit that there is something wryly amusing about him partially blaming Bugs Bunny for his departure from ABC ...

    I wonder if this had anything to do with Mel Blanc's never being a WML? mystery guest - or if it was just one of them dang coincidences, what with his schedule and all that . . . (plus the near-fatal car accident he'd had in early '61) . . .
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    TheNooz

    [62]Jan 5, 2006
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    I can think of another reason. Blanc was based on the West Coast. It's possible that he was just too busy and too much in demand to travel 3,000 miles for a game show appearance. He certainly didn't need the money or the publicity. He would have been a fun mystery guest, though!

    Midge
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    ymike673

    [63]Jan 5, 2006
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    The1Factotum1i1 wrote:
    I must have missed it, I guess they never showed it again. The Museum of Television and radio has video copies of all, whatever it was, 15 hours or more of it. Nobody should look forward to seeing it all unless you're one of the few who don't know how it all comes out. I saw (a lot of) it back in 1988.
    That they called a state for Kennedy that later turned out he didn't win, I guess we can attribute it to perhaps educated guesses projecting a trend that just didn't turn out that way. At the begining of the night, they made a big deal out of the fact they had a computer helping them predict, but very early on, it dropped from sight, as if it crashed and nothing could be done about it. Either that, or it was an out-and-out gimmick to jazz up the proceedings, that might impress and draw in initial viewers, but the NBC crew had little confidence in it and pretty much ignored it, and relied on their proven, non-electronic methods.
    Perhaps John Daly saw such things as a deeper commitment to doing the election right over at a rival network, further building his resentment, and ill-timed blow-up.


    A&E had several specials with NBC news footage. There was one with about six hours of footage from the day John Kennedy was assinated. It was timed to start at the same time in the afternoon that it happened in 1963. Early on in that broadcast it is thought that since the governor was in surgury rather then Kennedy maybe he was in worse shape then the President. A very interesting special.
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  • Avatar of W-B

    W-B

    [64]Jan 5, 2006
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    TheNooz wrote:
    I can think of another reason. Blanc was based on the West Coast. It's possible that he was just too busy and too much in demand to travel 3,000 miles for a game show appearance. He certainly didn't need the money or the publicity. He would have been a fun mystery guest, though!

    Funny . . . I'd've thought of Mr. Blanc's busy schedule and West Coast base myself, as well . . .
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  • Avatar of The1Factotum1i1

    The1Factotum1i1

    [65]Jan 5, 2006
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    Bugs Bunny was a hot show on ABC's prime-time schedule. I remember it. There were a bunch of cartoon shows on for, what would eventually be called "Family Hours" in the early 60's. The BB show was made up of the post-1948 Warner Brothers cartoons, with new animation made up for the titles and bumpers, which had little skits for the cartoon cast to participate in, usually having something to do with Daffy Duck trying to sabotage Bugs during his variety-like telecast. I have several kinescopes, including one where they do a "To Tell The Truth" type game show with an all-dog cast.
    Anyway, though TV had cartoons as early as the experimental days in the 1930's, and old public domain toons like the stuff produced from the (defunct in 1937) VanBuren studio were seen on such early network kiddie shows such as SMALL FRY CLUB. Cartoons made for TV go back to the days of the Truman administration, with such warmly recalled series as the witty CRUSADER RABBIT, and the ghastly, and deservedly forgotten NBC TELE-COMICS, which were only barely, even technically speaking, animated.
    In 1959, the dam broke on prime-time TV toons, with Bugs and ROCKY AND BULLWINKLE. The next year brought THE FLINTSTONES, and after that, THE ALVIN SHOW,TOP CAT,CALVIN AND THE COLONEL, THE JETSONS,JONNY QUEST, etc. Eventually the evening hours became devoid of them, I guess that adults had only so much tolerance for kids begging to stay up, or something.
    The full five hours, from the point when Kennedy was assasinated, (or rather, when it occurred to somebody at WNBC to start the Video tape machine, some ten minutes SINCE the first report!!)until the network is handed over for local station's time at six o'clock, was once shown, without interruptions, in live time, by A&E in about 1988. PBS affiliates had the option of running the same thing a few times in the early 90's. I watched it, it was truly fascinating. Certainly the opposite of the election night 1960 experience!
    At the time, I thought,"Won't this be wonderful if somehow the NBC news archives are now going to be used this way, with long, uninterrupted, untampered with, and uninterpreted for us by modern day commentators?" well it didn't happen, and even this important document is no longer run. That's too much time to be tossed out there without commercials. And who wants to sponsor such a downer?
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  • Avatar of billsav57

    billsav57

    [67]Jan 5, 2006
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    The NBC footage that A&E showed from the Kennedy assassination featured a great moment involving NBC newscaster Frank McGee. (However, I'm sure McGee didn't think it was so great when he found out about it.) He was trying to relay what Robert MacNeil was saying on a phone line from Texas, and for a minute or so, all you heard was McGee relaying the messages. But then they got the line going, and you could actually hear MacNeil's voice ... except nobody told McGee. So he just kept repeating what you could already hear MacNeil saying.
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  • Avatar of The1Factotum1i1

    The1Factotum1i1

    [68]Jan 6, 2006
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    Yes, under other circumstances, it might have even been funny, the limits of what we see as such low-tech today making the newsmen look foolish. But in such an emotionally numbing time, it's just painful to drag it out that way. Though they did an overall competent job of it. I can't imagine a whole lot of difference if it happened today, except for perhaps footage would be repeated endlessly on a split screen to go with the talking heads.
    When it happened, my mother would watch a few minutes of one station, then go to another, watch a few minutes, then go to another, searching for any new piece of news. Eventually she just left it on CBS and we watched their coverage for the next few hours.
    I think that all three networks came out about the same in their speed and accuracy, though in the NBC coverage it is at one point erroneously reported that Connolly had died. The local Dallas stations saved their footage, of which you must have seen selections from in documentaries. Even they had reported the mistaken Connolly story at least once as well, so, that was the state of the art.

    On the day of the attempt on Reagan's life in 1981, Both ABC and CBS had got the story wrong on also-shot James Brady, that he died. I recall Frank Reynolds came on afterwards seething mad, pounding his desk, demanding, "Let's get the story right!!"
    I'm sure that all the super tech in the world won't help you if your sources are faulty or untruthful. Look at that Mine disaster story of a few days ago. Some idiot came out and told the world the men were unharmed, and though he and the company knew this was wrong 20 minutes later, they decided to wait three hours before telling the real story. In that time, most major American media had the first story all over the place, and print media was especially embarrassed, such as USA TODAY.
    Many people I ran into saw the happy headlines and debated the trustworthiness of the press for that, but your information has to come from somewhere, and if all the had was a lie, with little reason to doubt it, they printed/broadcast it.
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  • Avatar of billsav57

    billsav57

    [69]Jan 6, 2006
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    It's only going to get worse with the brutal competition among the 24-hour channels, blogs, podcasts, and so on.
    I was in a Catholic grade school when the JFK assassination happened, and I got my news there ... you can imagine what that was like.
    As for the Reagan event, I left work that day and stopped at a store that had a huge appliance department, and was in that department watching the coverage when the Frank Reynolds thing happened, so it was sort of one of those old-fashioned communal TV-watching moments, like the old days when people stared into the electronics store window to watch big events.
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  • Avatar of W-B

    W-B

    [70]Jan 6, 2006
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    Actually, there was a time when A&E was airing old NBC News coverages, period. Not just the Kennedy election or assassination, but the July 20, 1969 moon landing, as well.
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  • Avatar of The1Factotum1i1

    The1Factotum1i1

    [71]Jan 7, 2006
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    I wish they'd do it again. The days when we could have universal cultural experiences, at least how it used to be, are gone. I think the "information revolution" as it's been described, has displaced a sort of national awareness of the world and truly relevant understanding one should have.

    When I was a kid, I knew more than the latest celebrity piffle so omnipresent now. I read newspapers and watched the evening news. I was no egghead, all the kids did, and would have been expected to possess basic knowledge at least of who some of the great men and events of the past were, as well as who the current Vice President, Governor and Mayor were. I'm still astonished by how few kids, and I mean even college-age fellow Americans don't know this or can see any reason to know it.

    John Daly was interested in history. Part of the well-rounded intellectual man of his time was devouring the great works on history.(as recounted in the TVG article). I wonder how he would think if he could see what things have come to now.
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    dad1153

    [73]Jan 7, 2006
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    I turned 33 last Friday and have been providing you folks some pretty old and cool shows from the past over the past couple of months. Do I count as an enlightened youngster by your definition?
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  • Avatar of Stopette

    Stopette

    [74]Jan 8, 2006
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    dad1153 wrote:
    I turned 33 last Friday and have been providing you folks some pretty old and cool shows from the past over the past couple of months. Do I count as an enlightened youngster by your definition?


    That depends on whether you "possess basic knowledge of who some of the great men and events of the past were, as well as who the current Vice President, Governor and Mayor [are]." That's how The1Factotum1i1 describes what he and his childhood / adolescent contemporaries were expected to have in the early to mid 1980s.

    Is "NBC TELE-COMICS" one of your "pretty old and cool shows ?" The1Factotum1i1 calls it "ghastly." Dismissing the work of a deceased animator(s) like that may or may not be fair. More importantly, may I assume that its ghastly quality didn't compromise early baby boom children's "basic knowledge of who some of the great men and events of the past were ...?" That was when kids were so worldly and good at time travelling.

    Can The1Factotum1i1 explain how he survived being bombarded by Peter Gabriel's MTV videos, Family Ties, Small Wonder and The Great Space Coaster ? How did the great men of history trump those television gems ?

    dad1153, as somebody who is three to four years younger than The1Factotum1i1, can you please tell us if Madonna's "Erotica" video on MTV became the siren that made the strong men of history weak ? If the deep meanings of Washington, Jefferson and Lincoln trumped "Erotica" during your adolescence, then you will always be "an enlightened youngster" by my definition.

    You never will feel old during your future channel surfing because you will know that enlightened youngsters consider most programming to be crap, therefore NOTHING could make you feel old. Many kids don't like what the front page of USA Today says they like.

    A term paper on Bennett Cerf's reaction to Philip Roth's 1968 manuscript of Portnoy's Complaint beats Erotica if you know your stuff. Seek buried treasure in the Random House vaults and ye shall find that SOMEBODY (*maybe* Bennett) considered masturbating into liver from a butcher shop to be the best medicine. Random House billed it as a comedy and laughter is the best medicine, right ? Screw "Erotica."

    If you'll excuse me, now I must buy some "knowledge of who some of the great men and events of the past were," then it's off to the butcher shop for some liver that pushes women EVEN FARTHER AWAY.
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  • Avatar of ymike673

    ymike673

    [76]Jan 8, 2006
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    W-B wrote:
    Actually, there was a time when A&E was airing old NBC News coverages, period. Not just the Kennedy election or assassination, but the July 20, 1969 moon landing, as well.


    Yes, this was a semi-regular A&E series in 1988/89. I missed the "Moon Landing" but recorded the Kennedy Election and Assasination coverage. Good thing because A&E never repeated those shows.
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  • Avatar of billsav57

    billsav57

    [79]Jan 16, 2006
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    This is from a story in The Boston Globe: "After dominating TV news for decades, male anchors are now in the minority nationwide, according to a study by the Radio-Television News Directors Association and Ball State University."
    The story goes on to tell how some TV stations have brought back male anchors in their 50s and 60s because they can't find any younger suitable replacements.
    I wonder what John Daly would think. I don't think he's a sexist or anything, but I think he might be at least surprised, if not disappointed, to find females now dominating his profession.
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  • Avatar of W-B

    W-B

    [80]Jan 17, 2006
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    I've been wondering myself what Mr. Daly would've thought of the incessant 24-hour news cycle we are all now witness to, as well as the broken-record coverage of every last move of various celebrities of our day (all the shows, i.e. ET, The Insider, Access Hollywood, recycling the same 5-10 celebrities every night).
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