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CBS (ended 1967)

JOHN DALY Forum

  • Avatar of The1Factotum1i1

    The1Factotum1i1

    [121]Mar 22, 2006
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    I think that Bennett said his full name, with Daly's response that "That's the FIRST time he ever said that right" about four times in all, and it's kind of painful if you recall the other times. The implication is that he and Bennett really had nothing much to do with each other offstage, and a lazy approach to good natured kidding comes off forced and fakey.
    Maybe it's a necessary component of leadership, be it in a board room or running a TV Quiz show, is one must feel superior to others. This certainly comes out in Daly. The constant references to Tilton school are there to remind all that he is in an elite class. I'm sure Bennett could buy and sell Daly a hundred times over, as a successful business man, but I get the idea that Daly wasn't very impressed.
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    ymike673

    [122]Mar 22, 2006
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    Since I have read that Bennett inherited his business and was kind of spoiled himself he probably had a lot in common with John. If you watch Bennett closely when he gets a "No" answer he will make a rather stern face as if to say, "How can I be wrong". Its all part of the fun of watching WML.
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    billsav57

    [123]Apr 17, 2006
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    John Daly showed what sets his WML shows apart the other night when he used the word "nomenclature." Where, other than perhaps in a rerun of "Firing Line," could you hear that sort of word used on television today?
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  • Avatar of billsav57

    billsav57

    [124]Apr 17, 2006
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    As he would in a later appearance, Arthur Godfrey called John Charles Daly by his preferred nickname, "Charlie," in his recent 1963 guest appearance.
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    W-B

    [125]Apr 18, 2006
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    billsav57 wrote:
    John Daly showed what sets his WML shows apart the other night when he used the word "nomenclature." Where, other than perhaps in a rerun of "Firing Line," could you hear that sort of word used on television today?

    Well, I use the word frequently when I can . . . but as far as hearing it on television is concerned, I can see your point.
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  • Avatar of billsav57

    billsav57

    [126]Apr 18, 2006
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    Words like that stand out when the program preceding them shows a guy breaking pencils with his derriere.
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    loeb123

    [129]Apr 20, 2006
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    And he was unflappable as well. I was watching an episode where someone got up from the audiance, ran on stage and started talking. The panel was blindfolded for the mystery guest. Daly didn't bat an eye, had security remove him, and went right on with the show. A man of class and distinction- the kind we miss today. Jay
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  • Avatar of outoffog

    outoffog

    [132]May 1, 2006
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    I believe John Charles Daly, like John Cameron Swayze, was a "news reader". He delivered the news, and had an opinion or two, but that was about it. He worked very hard to got where he became at ABC News (having most of his career as a CBS newsman, announcer, and "sophisticated" panel show host), and resigned from the network in late 1960 on principle- when he said, as their Vice President of News, "No outside documentaries", he meant it. But ABC DIDN'T have its own news documentary unit at that time. And when Bell & Howell offered to sponsor a weekly documentary, provided an independent production outfit be recruited to handle the content, ABC was hardly in a position to refuse [they needed the business AND prestiege]. And "BELL & HOWELL CLOSUP" DID present some great half-hour documentaries---but that didn't matter to John Daly. He thought the "CLOSEUP" series might have led to "biased" views on certain issues (ones that might please the sponsor, but not those who "wanted the truth"), and he walked away from ABC as a result. I believe he was tired of fighting network executives and the like for what he believed in...his tenure at the "Voice Of America" didn't last too long, either 
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  • Avatar of The1Factotum1i1

    The1Factotum1i1

    [133]May 8, 2006
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    Still something has to be said for his personality peccidillioes. I think he was hard to get along with, hard to get close to. The election day blow-up seems a little more emotional than a solid news reader/producer should be capable of. Look at one of the men that followed him at ABC, a fellow named Cochran. He was the on-air face of ABC news during the JFK tragedy. He was competant, precise and proffessional.  I suppose by same token though, he's pretty much forgotten and Daly isn't.  I reference the earlier entries on this thread covering Daly's career history.
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  • Avatar of outoffog

    outoffog

    [134]May 8, 2006
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    NOBODY remembers Ron Cochran, 'factotum'....or Bob Young.....and Don Gardner and Edward P. Morgan, too. They were four of ABC's most important newsmen in the early '60s, and it was because the network was conceived as a "third-rate" outfit....and the lack of kinescopes and videotapes available today....that "we" don't know who they were...and what's more, "we" don't care. {What you mean, "WE"??}

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    billsav57

    [135]May 8, 2006
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    Keep in mind Mike Wallace's claim that Daly laughed when he (Wallace) was trying to interview Castro, because Daly thought Castro would never last. Nearly 50 years later, Wallace and Castro are still around.

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    Fat-tote-bag

    [136]May 10, 2006
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    outoffog wrote:

    NOBODY remembers Ron Cochran, 'factotum'....or Bob Young.....and Don Gardner and Edward P. Morgan, too. They were four of ABC's most important newsmen in the early '60s, and it was because the network was conceived as a "third-rate" outfit....and the lack of kinescopes and videotapes available today....that "we" don't know who they were...and what's more, "we" don't care. {What you mean, "WE"??}

    Then there was Sam Jaffe, the ABC correspondent in Moscow in the late 1950s / early 1960s.  Around the time Khruschev fell from power in 1964, ABC executives transferred him to Nigeria.  Then came Mongolia.  Sam's daughter, born in Nigeria, has been trying for many years to make a documentary about the slow decline of his career.  Evidently those who back documentaries think "we don't care."  

    If you Google "sam jaffe" you'll find a lot about his uncle with the same name: the actor remembered for Gunga Din and Ben Casey.  You'll find almost nothing about the ABC correspondent.  Nothing about Moscow, Nigeria, Mongolia or the exact reason he was fired at last.

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  • Avatar of outoffog

    outoffog

    [138]May 22, 2006
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    ...and the sad fact is, 'fat-tote-bag', that no one today really cares about EITHER "Sam Jaffe". I don't know why his nephew was eventually eased out of ABC News, but I know his uncle retired in the early '70s after a long and successful acting career, and quietly passed away.  
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  • Avatar of ClassicTV

    ClassicTV

    [139]Jul 29, 2006
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    There is a brief (3 minute) audio clip of John Daly recalling in a 1964 retrospective the two days that he had to break into scheduled radio programs to announce the bulletins of 1941's Pearl Harbor attack and 1945's Roosevelt death.  Both of his bulletins are also played. 

    WAMU is the Washington, DC Public Broadcasting radio station that airs a 4-hour block of old radio programs every Sunday night from 7-11PM, called "The Big Broadcast".  The programs can be listened to on-line at that time, or are available to hear throughout the next week.  On the Sunday, July 23, 2006 broadcast, which one can hear through Monday, July 31, 2006, the last old show presented was "Farewell To Studio Nine", a program produced by CBS Radio News to mark the news department's vacating that studio for newer  facilities in 1964.

    Go to website:

    http://www.wamu.org/programs/bb/

    Scroll down to Last Week's Broadcast (July 23, 2006)

    Click Listen with Real Audio (or Windows Media Player)

    Once your system's player starts up, drag the play bar to the right until the time display reads 3:36:42 / 4:00:00.  Mr. Daly's segment ends at 3:39:39.

    8-1-2006 UPDATE: The page with John Daly has now been moved to their "2006 archives," with no link to listen.  In the three minute segment, Mr. Daly commented that the Pearl Harbor attack caused the CBS Radio Network to do something that had not been done up to that point in 1941:  suspend regularly scheduled programs to devote full coverage to the news of the Japanese attack.  He mentioned that in 1964 (the year that his remarks were recorded), it had become customary procedure for radio and TV to pre-empt their program schedules for major breaking news.  But it was revolutionary to do it on December 7, 1941, according to John.  With regard to announcing the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt on radio in April, 1945, Mr. Daly said that it was a hard task for him to do because he had known the president personally during the years that he had spent as a White House correspondent.  He contrasted the informality that reporters experienced at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue in the thirties and forties with the more rigid structure that existed at the White House in the post-JFK assassination era of 1964.  He stated that the number of reporters covering the president had increased since the 1930s/40s.  When the recordings of his two radio bulletins were played during the audio clip, they included a brief segment of the program or commercial that was on the air at the time.  Then John Daly's voice broke in with urgency:  "We interrupt this program to ..."

    Edited on 01/09/2007 5:09pm
    Edited 4 total times.
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  • Avatar of vdeowack

    vdeowack

    [140]Aug 2, 2006
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    Thanks for those links, they were very interesting to listen to.
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