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CBS (ended 1967)

July 15(early 16th), 2007 - One final evening with Dorothy

  • Avatar of TVGord

    TVGord

    [1]Jun 25, 2007
    • member since: 06/16/05
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    Fingers crossed that no events cause a preemption, this will be the final episode with Dorothy Kilgallen. I wonder if it's possible that the 3:30am episode might be taken up with Dorothy's actual final television appearance, the To Tell The Truth edition she and Arlene taped a few days before Dorothy's death, which aired the day of her death. I don't even know if it even exists anymore, but wouldn't it be wonderful to see?
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  • Avatar of ClassicTV

    ClassicTV

    [2]Jun 27, 2007
    • member since: 10/22/05
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    I didn't know that Dorothy and Arlene taped a "TTTT" at that time. I checked on "The Goodson/Todman Big 4 Game Show Index" website. The "known" episode list for the daytime version has only one entry for 1965, and then jumps to 1966:

    http://www.kinescopes.com/TTTT_am.html

    The primetime episode list has other panelists for November, 1965:

    http://www.kinescopes.com/TTTT_pm.html

    If the DK/AF "TTTT" episodes were for daytime, it looks like they're not known to exist either on tape or film.

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  • Avatar of astorino

    astorino

    [3]Jul 5, 2007
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    More on this TTTT from the database:

    However, on a more serious note, sometimes when a show is videotaped, events that have happened might really cause some embarrassment. One such incident occurred on November 8, 1965. On that afternoon, an episode of "To Tell the Truth" was broadcast as usual. On that episode, Joan Crawford appeared on the show to play a special game in which the panel was supposed to guess which of three disguised ladies was "the REAL John Crawford." The women were disguised by wearing veils on over their heads and having their voices electronically distorted. After the game, Joan and the two imposters unmasked. The imposters were none other than Arlene Francis and Dorothy Kilgallen. Sadly, a few hours before this episode was shown on television, Dorothy had died in her New York townhouse. After TTTT concluded, there was an announcement informing the audience that the show had been videotaped a couple of weeks earlier and that Dorothy had just passed away. - Sargebri
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  • Avatar of stopettearoma

    stopettearoma

    [4]Jul 6, 2007
    • member since: 11/23/06
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    astorino wrote:
    More on this TTTT from the database: However, on a more serious note, sometimes when a show is videotaped, events that have happened might really cause some embarrassment. One such incident occurred on November 8, 1965. On that afternoon, an episode of "To Tell the Truth" was broadcast as usual. On that episode, Joan Crawford appeared on the show to play a special game in which the panel was supposed to guess which of three disguised ladies was "the REAL John Crawford." The women were disguised by wearing veils on over their heads and having their voices electronically distorted. After the game, Joan and the two imposters unmasked. The imposters were none other than Arlene Francis and Dorothy Kilgallen. Sadly, a few hours before this episode was shown on television, Dorothy had died in her New York townhouse. After TTTT concluded, there was an announcement informing the audience that the show had been videotaped a couple of weeks earlier and that Dorothy had just passed away. - Sargebri

    The episode was videotaped just six days earlier, not a couple of weeks. Maybeone person thought the broadcast "might really cause some embarrassment" to CBS executives, but if you were old enough to know what was going on in 1965, you know that mostpeople wouldn't have considered picking on CBS. Most people learned of Dorothy's death several hours afterCBS newscaster DouglasEdwards announced it at 3:25 p.m. There were novideocassettes in 1965, which meant that you had to be in your house before 3:30 on a Monday afternoon in order tosee "evidence" that Dorothy was alive. Mostgrown men and childrenwere out of the house at that hour, and they depended on newspapers and radio newscasts to know who died that day.Even radio was tough -- no Walkman. Whatever thoughts they had about the news concerned Dorothy, not anyone at CBS who might be out of touch.

    Not only were videocassettes a fantasy in 1965, but it was even difficult to buy and store the videotape that CBS actually used. Many Internet posts and web sites since the 1990s have made it clear that CBS wiped a large majority of the videotapes used for daytime game shows.Goodson Todman couldn't possiblypay CBS (and another network that showed "Missing Links") to kinescope even asizable minority of them. The episode with Dorothy, Arlene and Joan Crawford was one of literally thousands of daytime games that are lost.

    Also, this coming Sunday you will not see the night Dorothy died. You will see her a week prior to her death. You will hear Steve Allen say, "Her little boy is out tonight trick-or-treating in a limousine." Arlene says sarcastically, "That's the best way."

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