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CBS (ended 1967)

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  • Avatar of ymike673

    ymike673

    [21]Aug 15, 2005
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    lovewml wrote:
    I heard that the British version of WML used mimes on the show to give clues to the panelists. No wonder it didn't last. God, I hate mimes! I'm so glad they didn't try it on our WML- I think I'd rather watch Beat the Clock.


    11 years for a British show is a very long run. Probably would be considered as long a run as the 18 years the US version was on the air.
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  • Avatar of EveCarla

    EveCarla

    [22]Aug 17, 2005
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    That clip with the "Charades" overtones is HILARIOUS! Suzanne, you cover every conceivable base. It was a pleasure to see that...thanks for the link & for all your accessibility.

    & suffice it to say, that I'm glad the U.S. version decided AGAINST that little move...
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    astorino

    [23]Aug 17, 2005
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    EveCarla, you're welcome. Another mystery is that we've been told that the BBC did not save any of their WML episodes. If so - who, when, where and how was the clip made? Obviously, some are out there lurking.
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    sixtyfivealive

    [24]Aug 18, 2005
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    I guess the BBC didn't have the same "Fates" that WML had here.
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  • Avatar of The1Factotum1i1

    The1Factotum1i1

    [25]Aug 19, 2005
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    There was one, a Ca. 1960 episode, possibly the one that the clip is extracted from-(No matter what I do, I can't get it- I probably am supposed to have some $500 attachment to my computer I don't know about!) that should be in the archives of the Museum of Television and radio. It was shown in the early 1980's sometime. Maybe it was saved because it was the last Gilbert Harding one.
    However, In a documentary about the BBC, another, earlier episode is shown a segment of. This documentary is something from the 1970's, and I haven't seen it since then.
    I don't know why there aren't any in the G-T archive. You'd think they'd have a few just to monitor how their franchise was doing in Britain.
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  • Avatar of Fat-tote-bag

    Fat-tote-bag

    [26]Aug 20, 2005
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    The1Factotum1i1 wrote:
    There was one, a Ca. 1960 episode, possibly the one that the clip is extracted from-(No matter what I do, I can't get it- I probably am supposed to have some $500 attachment to my computer I don't know about!) that should be in the archives of the Museum of Television and radio. It was shown in the early 1980's sometime. Maybe it was saved because it was the last Gilbert Harding one.
    However, In a documentary about the BBC, another, earlier episode is shown a segment of. This documentary is something from the 1970's, and I haven't seen it since then.
    I don't know why there aren't any in the G-T archive. You'd think they'd have a few just to monitor how their franchise was doing in Britain.


    How could Goodson Todman have obtained the kinescope in that era? They paid CBS for the kinescopes starting in 1952. If any questions arose about that business deal, somebody could telephone somebody else for free or just pennies. A courier could deliver the can of film in less than an hour. But CBS couldn't make kinescopes of BBC films. That would have required Goodson Todman paying for international phone calls and telegrams (very expensive then) and transatlantic shipping of heavy film in cans.

    Goodson Todman's job was to entertain American TV viewers, who knew nothing of the BBC. Why spend so much money to compare your product with its counterpart in a foreign country? Do you understand profits and losses?
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  • Avatar of astorino

    astorino

    [27]Aug 21, 2005
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    The1Factotum1i1 wrote:
    No matter what I do, I can't get it - (The BBC clip) - I probably am supposed to have some $500 attachment to my computer I don't know about.


    No, no attachment needed, but you DO need to have the free RealPlayer installed.

    The download link is on this page:

    http://forms.real.com/netzip/getrde601.html?h=software-dl.real.com&r=225a3a29c287dfef5204&f=windows/RealPlayer10-5GOLD_bb.exe&p=RealOne+Player&oem=dlrhap_bb&tagtype=ie&type=dlrhap_bb
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  • Avatar of astorino

    astorino

    [28]Aug 30, 2005
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    The magazine readers sure loved WML, that's for sure. The early 1950-1954 WML shows featured awards from: TV Guide Gold Metal Award, Look magazine award, Chicago's TV Forecast magazine award, Motion Picture Daily magazine award, Radio-TV Mirror magazine award, American Weekly Magazine award, Sylvania TV award, Radio & Television Daily award, and maybe more! In September 1954, Bennett announced that they had won at least 32 national awards. I wonder why these types of awards seemingly abruptly stopped about the time that Bennett announced that? Did the polls go out of vogue? - Suzanne
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  • Avatar of W-B

    W-B

    [29]Sep 28, 2005
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    Fat-tote-bag wrote:
    The1Factotum1i1 wrote:
    There was one, a Ca. 1960 episode, possibly the one that the clip is extracted from-(No matter what I do, I can't get it- I probably am supposed to have some $500 attachment to my computer I don't know about!) that should be in the archives of the Museum of Television and radio. It was shown in the early 1980's sometime. Maybe it was saved because it was the last Gilbert Harding one.
    However, In a documentary about the BBC, another, earlier episode is shown a segment of. This documentary is something from the 1970's, and I haven't seen it since then.
    I don't know why there aren't any in the G-T archive. You'd think they'd have a few just to monitor how their franchise was doing in Britain.


    How could Goodson Todman have obtained the kinescope in that era? They paid CBS for the kinescopes starting in 1952. If any questions arose about that business deal, somebody could telephone somebody else for free or just pennies. A courier could deliver the can of film in less than an hour. But CBS couldn't make kinescopes of BBC films. That would have required Goodson Todman paying for international phone calls and telegrams (very expensive then) and transatlantic shipping of heavy film in cans.

    Goodson Todman's job was to entertain American TV viewers, who knew nothing of the BBC. Why spend so much money to compare your product with its counterpart in a foreign country? Do you understand profits and losses?

    Also, I.I.N.M., the BBC (which produced the U.K. version of WML? from 1951 to 1963) had no equivalent of Gil Fates working in their staff. And of course in the 1970's a good amount of their archive had been purged for supposed economic and/or space reasons. G-T themselves did not necessarily have a direct connection to the British WML? other than their show being the basis therefor.
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  • Avatar of The1Factotum1i1

    The1Factotum1i1

    [30]Sep 28, 2005
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    Until they sold it to the network, Goodson-Todman owned WML? 100%. After that, they were still in charge of the show's production and standards. What F ag-Tote-Bat doesn't understand is the phenomena of licencing. If you hold a valuable international property such as WML?, it is monitored to protect quality in it's alternates. In that era, to keep tabs on the BBC's version, you could either toot off to blighty to catch it live, or, more logically, every so often a Kinescope would be made and sent to G-T's HQ. There would be no need to see every one, as it would seem unlikely that things might get very out of hand, or anyone was trying to conceal anything.
    After screening said licenced versions, the films would become useless, and deemed unworthy of preservation.
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  • Avatar of Fat-tote-bag

    Fat-tote-bag

    [31]Sep 30, 2005
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    The1Factotum1i1 wrote:
    Until they sold it to the network, Goodson-Todman owned WML? 100%. After that, they were still in charge of the show's production and standards. What F ag-Tote-Bat doesn't understand is the phenomena of licencing. If you hold a valuable international property such as WML?, it is monitored to protect quality in it's alternates. In that era, to keep tabs on the BBC's version, you could either toot off to blighty to catch it live, or, more logically, every so often a Kinescope would be made and sent to G-T's HQ. There would be no need to see every one, as it would seem unlikely that things might get very out of hand, or anyone was trying to conceal anything.
    After screening said licenced versions, the films would become useless, and deemed unworthy of preservation.


    Please name one employee of Goodson Todman who has said that their "valuable international property" "is monitored to protect quality in it's alternates." All the heavyweights in the company from that era are gone. Gil Fates doesn't say in his book that he ever looked at BBC kinescopes in the 1950s. Lee Silvershein and Pam Usdan may be alive, but they didn't know what the men in the company knew.
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  • Avatar of astorino

    astorino

    [32]Oct 29, 2005
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    The1Factotum1i1 wrote:
    Until they sold it to the network, Goodson-Todman owned WML? 100%.


    When CBS bought the American version, I wonder what became of the British, French, German, Portuguese, etc. versions? I wonder if Goodson-Todman sold them, also? Too bad Gil's book wasn't longer and more detailed. Doesn't he realize the unanswered questions he's left behind?
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  • Avatar of The1Factotum1i1

    The1Factotum1i1

    [33]Nov 1, 2005
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    For the most part, the forign ones didn't last as long, or outlast the original. BBC's punked out in 1963, and If memory serves, the French CBC version in 1965. Others were in fact, totally unauthorized. I recall an episode of IGAS where there was an American Judo expert, a soldier stationed in Japan. He mentioned that he had previously been a guest on the Japanese version of IGAS. Garry had to add that that was in fact, a rip-off version without authorization.
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  • Avatar of W-B

    W-B

    [34]Nov 1, 2005
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    The1Factotum1i1 wrote:
    For the most part, the forign [sic] ones didn't last as long, or outlast the original. BBC's punked out in 1963, and If memory serves, the French CBC version in 1965. Others were in fact, totally unauthorized. I recall an episode of IGAS where there was an American Judo expert, a soldier stationed in Japan. He mentioned that he had previously been a guest on the Japanese version of IGAS. Garry had to add that that was in fact, a rip-off version without authorization.

    Although, I.I.N.M., in the U.K., after a false-start attempt at a revival in 1973 (hosted by Derek Jacobs), WML? had another reasonably long run from 1984 until 1990, produced by Thames Television. Original "chairman" Eamonn Andrews once again held the post for the last three years of his life, then after his death hosts included Britcom star Penelope Keith and newsreader Angela Rippon. There was yet another revival attempt, produced by Meridien Television, in 1994, hosted by Emma Forbes.
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  • Avatar of The1Factotum1i1

    The1Factotum1i1

    [35]Nov 1, 2005
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    Yes, that's right. Idon't think G-T had anything to do with it by then, CBS was full owner. There was an attempt to bring it back here, so I've heard, as a female-oriented version on LIFETIME cable network, but if it did make it to air, it must have folded very quickly.
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  • Avatar of Steverino

    Steverino

    [36]Nov 2, 2005
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    The1Factotum1i1 wrote:
    Yes, that's right. Idon't think G-T had anything to do with it by then, CBS was full owner. There was an attempt to bring it back here, so I've heard, as a female-oriented version on LIFETIME cable network, but if it did make it to air, it must have folded very quickly.


    Then CBS planned to revive it with Harry Anderson as moderator. He's remembered most for Night Court in the 1980s and his several stints hosting Saturday Night Live. CBS scrapped the plans, which in my opinion was a smart move. If you want to revive it, you have to stay away from too many has - been entertainers.

    John Daly and Wally Bruner were serious journalists. Larry Blyden may have been a sharp game player and host, but evidently syndication audiences found him too silly and show business - oriented. In February / March 1975, less than three years after Blyden took over, too few station managers around North America opted to pick up the syndicated WML, and Goodson Todman was forced to scrap it.
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  • Avatar of lovewml

    lovewml

    [37]Nov 7, 2005
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    The Larry Blyden hosted WML was my introduction to the show in the early '70s. I always assumed that Mr Blyden's death in an auto accident was the reason it went off the air in '75. I thought he was a very likable host and was saddened when I heard of his tragic death. Of course, after seeing the original WML, the syndicated one is an embarrassment in comparison. I was just 13 when it went off the air. It probably had more kid appeal with the bright garish color scheme, the cheesy music, and Soupy Sales as a panelist.
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    W-B

    [38]Nov 7, 2005
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    lovewml wrote:
    The Larry Blyden hosted WML was my introduction to the show in the early '70s. I always assumed that Mr Blyden's death in an auto accident was the reason it went off the air in '75. I thought he was a very likable host and was saddened when I heard of his tragic death. Of course, after seeing the original WML, the syndicated one is an embarrassment in comparison. I was just 13 when it went off the air. It probably had more kid appeal with the bright garish color scheme, the cheesy music, and Soupy Sales as a panelist.

    Although the very last episodes of the syndicated WML? were taped in December of 1974 - about half a year before Mr. Blyden's death. And he was supposed to host another game show, I.I.N.M., at the time of his death.
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  • Avatar of lovewml

    lovewml

    [39]Nov 7, 2005
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    Yes. You are correct, sir. I now recall reading that in the Gil Fate's book. But what does I.I.N.M. mean?
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    W-B

    [40]Nov 7, 2005
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    lovewml wrote:
    (W)hat does I.I.N.M. mean?

    'Tis shorthand for "If I'm not mistaken." Hope this answers your query.
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