What's My Line? Forums

CBS (ended 1967)

The Commercials

  • Avatar of anniesmom

    anniesmom

    [1]Mar 26, 2008
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    I wish we could see the ads that they ran at the time. I love the Stoppette ones at the beginning but it would be pretty cool to see what else was being sold. Also, did you notice that the commercial breaks are so short? I watch American Idol every week and I can do a load of wash and the dinner dishes in one commercial break! They were so short on WML?
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  • Avatar of ymike673

    ymike673

    [2]Mar 27, 2008
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    In the 1950's the average 30 minute show would have about 27-28 minutes of actual program content. By the 1960's this was down to 25 minutes Today the average 30 minute show only has about 20-22 minutes of content. That is why you have so much time to do the dishes during the commercials,lol.
    Edited on 03/27/2008 11:18am
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  • Avatar of agent_0042

    agent_0042

    [3]Mar 27, 2008
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    Well, if it's an Idol results show, you only have about 40-44 minutes of non-commercial content. Then, once you eliminate the ridiculous in-show car ad, recaps of the performances you already saw, the ridiculous viewer call-in segment, and tune out all the ridiculous vocal jousting between Simon and Ryan, you're down to about 15-20 minutes at most.
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  • Avatar of anniesmom

    anniesmom

    [4]Mar 27, 2008
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    agent_0042 wrote:
    Well, if it's an Idol results show, you only have about 40-44 minutes of non-commercial content. Then, once you eliminate the ridiculous in-show car ad, recaps of the performances you already saw, the ridiculous viewer call-in segment, and tune out all the ridiculous vocal jousting between Simon and Ryan, you're down to about 15-20 minutes at most.

    I don't think you like AI very much! Are you trying to tell me that it is a frivolous and silly program?? Anyway, you are correct. The commercials are endless but so to with House, Grey's Anatomy and all the rest. Tiresome as can be. Maybe we need some intervention of some sort. I use the mute a lot and also toggle between stations.

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  • Avatar of agent_0042

    agent_0042

    [5]Mar 28, 2008
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    :
    Are you trying to tell me that it is a frivolous and silly program??

    No, only the results portion.
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  • Avatar of puzzlingpixie

    puzzlingpixie

    [6]Mar 29, 2008
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    I've noticed that too, and it always amuses me. This is why I have a DVR. On a normal tv program (that I have already recorded) it will take 9 clicks forward to get through one commercial break and opposed to the one or one and a half clicks that it takes for WML.
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  • Avatar of catnipygoodnss

    catnipygoodnss

    [7]Apr 20, 2008
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    I too wish they would run the old commercials. It keeps with the spirit of the show being run. I would also like to see more of the old shows from the 50's and 60's. IMO they are a much better fare than poker. Watching poker is like watching grass grow but far less interesting. I love to play it, not watch it.

    Watching WML? and IGAS is like going back in time to my childhood and commercials would make it a complete experience.
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  • Avatar of ClassicTV

    ClassicTV

    [8]Sep 14, 2008
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    I purchased and watched the four episode DVD of WML? that is now available through retailers. As the shows contain the original commercials, and as a forum member wondered awhile ago what episodes were included on the disc, I'll provide my observations under this thread. On the disc itself is a colorized picture of the first panel from 1950 seated behind a wood-grained table watching as a challenger signs in.

    Episode #1:

    Sponsored by Remington Rand, makers of the Remington, the world's number one electric shaver. Astorino has noted previously that this is a lost episode that is not part of the GSN or Goodson/Todman library. Panel: Dorothy Kilgallen, Steve Allen, Arlene Francis, and Deborah Kerr. Challengers: Frances Vaughn, from Kansas, Movie Censor for Kansas State Board; Cliff Olsen, from Hickory, North Carolina, Sells Maternity Clothes.

    A commercial follows featuring Remington spokesman Dick Stark, who introduces a barbershop quartet singing "reach for the Remington, the shaver that can shave a peach will give you a peach of a shave."

    Mystery Guest: Lucille Ball, next challenger: Tom Wiswell from Brooklyn, New York, World Champion Professional Checker Player.

    Commercial: Dick Stark talks about the $7.50 trade-in allowance for your old shaver, and mentions that Remington Rand also makes typewriters and business machines. After John Daly invites viewers to watch again next week, there is a commercial from Stopette Spray Deodorant. A package containing two bottles, one a trial size, costs $1.25.

    Episode #2:

    Sponsored by Remington Rand. Panel: Dorothy Kilgallen, Robert Q. Lewis, Arlene Francis (who holds up a home version WML? game box), and Bennett Cerf. Challengers: Raymond Fadden, Operates Scoreboard At Ebbets Field; Victor G. Perry of London, Professional Pickpocket In Nightclub Act.

    Commercial: Dick Stark talks about Remington electric shavers while in front of a projection screen that is showing Jim Condon (not sure of correct spelling), who demonstrates how fast the shaver works on his whiskers. Stark notes that the Remington can shave the fuzz off a peach without damaging the fruit's soft skin, and describes the 14 day free trial and $7.50 trade-in for your old shaver.

    Mystery Guests: Desi Arnaz and Lucille Ball.

    Commercial: Dick Stark reiterates the two-week free trial, after which John asks viewers to tune in again next week at 10:30PM Eastern Daylight Savings Time. John then introduces a word from next week's sponsor, Mr. Stopette Deodorant For Men. The commercial also shows a Mr. and Mrs. combo of Stopette bottles selling for 98 cents plus tax. The panel then says goodnight.

    Episode #3:

    Sponsored by Remington Rand. The panel had been seated during the introductions on the previous two programs, but they walk onstage in this show: Arlene Francis, Desi Arnaz, Dorothy Kilgallen, and Fred Allen. Challenger: Randolph S. Churchill, British Foreign Correspondent and son of Winston; Floyd Carlson, from Richmond Hills, Texas, Helicopter Pilot who will transport Desi and Lucy to her hometown, Jamestown, New York, the next day.

    Commercial: John says that "we switch you to the CBS Remote Unit." After filmed hurricane footage, Dick Stark is at Remington Rand's computer center in New York to show Univac, which he predicts will give more accurate weather predictions in the future.

    Mystery Guest: Kim Novak. As the program winds down, John observes that it is WML?'s sixth anniversary, with February 2nd being the actual date. He relates that nice telegrams were received from the head of CBS, Frank Stanton, and from "our old colleague, Hal Block."

    Commercial: Next week's sponsor, Univac/Remington Rand, who "leads the field of electronic computing." The panel's good-nights follow.

    Episode #4:

    Sonsored by Stopette/Finesse. Panel: Dorothy Kilgallen, Bennett Cerf, Arlene Francis (who is a brunette in this program), and Hal Block. Challengers: John Butler, Mayor of San Diego: Carl Mills, Atlanta, Georgia, Prison Warden.

    Commercial: On stage in front of a curtain, spokesperson Barbara Joyce reads from Glamour Magazine about Dr. Jules Montenier and his Finesse Cream Shampoo. It comes in a plastic bottle with bellows action that allows the user to squeeze the sides to dispense the product. (For more on this then revolutionary non-glass shampoo bottle and a little information on the WML? radio show that initially was on NBC, here is a link: http://www.old-time.com/commercials/1950's/Poof%20There%20Goes%20Perspiration.htm).

    Mystery Guest: Bette Davis. Afterwards, John notes that while the next challenger is getting ready to sign in, he'd like to invite people who want to be on the show to send a picture of themself along with their name, address, occupation, and when they'll be in New York to: CBS, 485 Madison Avenue, New York 22, New York.

    Next Challenger: Irene Kurit, Indianapolis Paper Hanger.

    Then a filmed Stopette spray deodorant commercial asks, "What's your line?", and shows a housewife who appreciates Stopette's day-long protection both while she does her housework and later when she has to look her best at dinnertime. A close-up of the Stopette bottle being squeezed is accompanied by the slogan, "Poof, there goes perspiration."

    John returns to tease next week's show by displaying a photo of a young woman who will appear. He asks the viewers if they can guess her line. The panel then says goodnight.

    The picture quality was not too bad on these kinescopes aside from the expected scratches and one noticeable splice, which rendered lost to posterity a few seconds of one program. This DVD was worth the $5.36 price (10% off for Labor Day sale). For the same price, I also bought a disc containing two episodes of "I've Got A Secret" and two "Beat The Clock" shows, mainly to see if "IGAS" included original commercials that would never be broadcast today. (I haven't yet watched that DVD.)

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  • Avatar of silverscreen789

    silverscreen789

    [9]Sep 16, 2008
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    Re: American Idol. VERY true. In fact, I never watch the results show anymore. I just look online the following day. This show is quickly losing it's appeal for me--finally after so many seasons. I DVR everything and FF through commercials these days.

    I would love to see the commercials intact for WML?.. Curiosity really.

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  • Avatar of stopettearoma

    stopettearoma

    [10]Sep 16, 2008
    • member since: 11/23/06
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    catnipygoodnss wrote:
    I too wish they would run the old commercials. It keeps with the spirit of the show being run. I would also like to see more of the old shows from the 50's and 60's. IMO they are a much better fare than poker. Watching poker is like watching grass grow but far less interesting. I love to play it, not watch it. Watching WML? and IGAS is like going back in time to my childhood and commercials would make it a complete experience.

    In addition to the original Line commercials that "classictv" describes in this thread, you can see many others. During the first few years of Game Show Network's life (December 1994 to 1997? 1998?), it occasionally ran the entire kinescopes complete with ads. The episodes on classictv's DVD all date from 1956 or prior. You also can see a 1963 episode with Woody Allen on the panel and a jolly commercial for Kellogg's that is followed immediately by mystery guests Peter, Paul and Mary. I obtained a DVD disc of it from someone who captured the rerun on the old Game Show Network and burned me a copy at my request.

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