Yes, Prime Minister

Season 2 Episode 1

Man Overboard

0
Aired Thursday 9:00 PM Dec 03, 1987 on BBC Two
9.1
out of 10
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Episode Summary

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Sir Humphrey makes Jim suspicious of the Minister of Employment when he needs the PM's support in opposing a plan to shift military personnel from the south to the north of England.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
    Nigel Hawthorne

    Nigel Hawthorne

    Sir Humphrey Appleby

    John Nettleton

    John Nettleton

    Sir Arnold Robinson

    Paul Eddington

    Paul Eddington

    Rt Hon James Hacker

    Derek Fowlds

    Derek Fowlds

    Bernard Woolley

    Diana Hoddinott

    Diana Hoddinott

    Annie Hacker

    Frederick Treves

    Frederick Treves

    Chief of the Defence Staff

    Guest Star

    Hillary Field

    Hillary Field

    Unknown

    Guest Star

    Geoffrey Cousins

    Geoffrey Cousins

    Unknown

    Guest Star

    Deborah Norton

    Deborah Norton

    Dorothy Wainwright

    Recurring Role

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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    • TRIVIA (0)

    • QUOTES (6)

      • Hacker: It's envy, you know. Dudley is consumed with envy.
        Bernard: It's one of the Seven Dudley Sins -
        Humphrey: (interrupting) Yes, thank you, Bernard...

      • Sir Humphrey: Why do they want your job so much?
        Jim Hacker: Because I am the only member of the government that can't be send to Northern Ireland next week.

      • Sir Arnold: Are you suggesting that I give confidential information to the press?
        Sir Humphrey: Certainly not, Arnold. This is confidential disinformation.
        Sir Arnold: Ah, that is different.

      • Sir Arnold: I presume the Prime Minister is in favour of this scheme because it will reduce unemployment?
        Sir Humphrey: Well, it looks as if he's reducing unemployment.
        Sir Arnold: Or looks as if he's trying to reduce unemployment.
        Sir Humphrey: While as in reality he's only trying to look as if he's trying to reduce unemployment.
        Sir Arnold: Yes, because he's worried that it does not look as if he's trying to look as if he's trying to reduce unemployment.

      • Sir Humphrey: Now go in there and inform me of their conversation.
        Bernard Woolley: I'm not sure I can do that, Sir Humphrey. It might be confidential.
        Sir Humphrey: Bernard, the matter at issue is the defense of the realm and the stability of the government.
        Bernard Woolley: But you only need to know things on a need to know basis.
        Sir Humphrey: I need to know everything! How else can I judge whether or not I need to know it?
        Bernard Woolley: So that means you need to know things even when you don't need to know. You need to know them not because you need to know them, but because you need to know whether or not you need to know. And if you don't need to know you still need to know, so that you know there is no need to know.

      • Sir Humphrey: It is characteristic of all committee discussions and decisions that every member has a vivid recollection of them and that every member's recollection of them differs violently from every other member's recollection. Consequently, we accept the convention that the official decisions are those and only those which have been officially recorded in the minutes by the Officials, from which it emerges with an elegant inevitability that any decision which has been officially reached will have been officially recorded in the minutes by the Officials and any decision which is not recorded in the minutes is not been officially reached even if one or more members believe they can recollect it, so in this particular case, if the decision had been officially reached it would have been officially recorded in the minutes by the Officials. And it isn't so it wasn't.

    • NOTES (0)

    • ALLUSIONS (0)

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