A last minute addition to this post. Something small to take the edge off.




Kopps (2003), directed by Josef Fares. A rural town in Sweden is threatened to lose their police station due to lack of crime. The cops take crime in their own hands.



A collaborative post between Syrinx2 and Rolamb.

As we talked about in our first post about the European detective series and especially on the Danish ones, we understand that lots of you would be happy to see quality European series, even with subtitles. To make up a little and make you more aware of the good detective series Europe has made in the last thirty years, Syrinx2 and Rolamb will bring you a series of posts about the best detective series Europe has brought us. We hope to at least give you the idea of the European series that could be interesting to see. Often the subtitles are available (we also use them to understand what they’re saying), so maybe you could be able to see them too.

This week we'll continue with Sweden.

From Sweden there's one series that we remember beside the two major series: Wallander (2005-2013) set in Ystad, and Beck (1997-2010) set in Stockholm. Out of those, Wallander has been remade in UK with Kenneth Branagh as detective Wallander. The books Beck is made from were broadcasted by BBC Radio 4 as The Martin Beck Killings.


Swedish crime author Henning Mankell has written about inspector Wallander since 1991. The lead role has been portrayed by three actors, Rolf Lassgård, Krister Henriksson and lately Kenneth Branagh (BBC) (2008- filming ). The BBC aired all 26 episodes of the Swedish television versions on BBC Four. Althouigh most of the stories in both the UK and Sweden are mostly based on the same stories, Henrikson and Branagh are very different actors who both gave the series a different feel. We’ve seen both and they each have their own appeal. The series has what it takes to be a Midsomer Murders of Sweden. We will cover the British Isles in a later episode of our detective series.
Branagh is scheduled to make three more films (season 4) as Kurt Wallander. They will be The White Lioness, which will be followed by a two part movie called The Troubled Man. The White Lioness previously was shot by SVT, DR, NRK in 1996 with Lassgård as Wallander. The Troubled Man was released in Swedish 2013 with Henriksson as Wallander. Henriksson just retired Wallander in Sorgfågeln (2013) which became the series finale.




(Henriksson in a Horatio Caine / David Caruso moment)


The series about inspector Martin Beck has a longer run than Wallander. The first film in the series is Roseanna from 1967 and is based on the works of author couple Sjöwall/Wahlöö. Here, Beck is played by Keve Hjelm. The following film, The Laughing Policeman, was made in the US with Walther Matthau as Beck (1973).
Swedish actor Carl-Gustaf Lindstedt took over as Beck in the following film The Man on The Roof (1976).
In 1980 a cooperation between Hungary, West-Germany and Sweden had The Man Who Went Up in Smoke as a result with UK actor Derek Jacobi as Beck.

This was followed by another International effort, this time from Netherlands called Beck - De gesloten kamer. (Beck- The Closed Room) 1993.
After these films six films were made with Swedish actor Gösta Ekman as the inspector.

He was followed by Peter Haber who played the role twenty six times. The Beck-series has become a staple on Swedish television with recurring characters that everyone know. At least by reputation.




The burly detective Gunvald Larsson is played by Mikael Persbrandt who is portraying Beorn in the second Peter Jackson film The Hobbit: There and Back Again based upon the book The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien that will be in cinemas this Christmas.



The retired neighbour who always invites Beck on a night cap. We know what he's about to say even before he enters the scene.



The series we think of besides the two mentioned above is what began as a film in 1999, Zero Tolerance (Noll Tollerans). The film is followed by fourteen films to date. Six more films are scheduled to be filmed in 2014-2015. The initial three episodes are self contained while the twelve next ones are linked in story and theme.




The setting is in Gothenburg and we follow Johan Falk (also the series name), a police detective played by Jakob Eklund.
My (Syrinx2) favorite episode is Livvakterna (2001) known as Executive Protection, where Falk loses his job and is recruited by a private company working with personal and company protection. The theme of Executive Protection is that international crime is rising and there are too little resources to follow up even the smallest crimes.
This is a more high paced action police drama compared to Wallander and Beck. Livvakterna is starring Jakob Eklund, Alexandra Rappaport and last but not least Krister Henriksson.


Later in the series, Joel Kinnaman (The Killing) is playing an infiltrator.


One new acquaintance of ours is a series by Åke Edwardson starring his inspector Erik Winter (2001-2010) who is located to the Swedish West coast as was the Johan Falk series.




Initially, actor Johan Gry played inspector Winter but in the later episodes he was replaced by Magnus Krepper (Bron). Winter is more dark and troubled in the setting than Johan Falk. And it showcases Sweden is a true way. Multicultural and not all rich.

At least the same quality is being offered in Arne Dahl (a pseudonym of the award winning author Jan Arnald). This series is based on five of Arnald’s novels and revolves around a (fictional) tight-knit team of elite specialists called "A Gruppen" in Swedish and "The Intercrime Group" in the English translation, who investigate the dark side of society. Outside of Sweden, the series was broadcast in numerous other countries.

The series is currently being broadcast in the United States through MHz Networks.





We still have posts on the UK, Germany, Ireland, the Netherlands, Belgium, France and Italy in the planning. We have written about Denmark already.

Incidentally, Hulu has bought Bron || Broen and will stream it on a later date.

Next week we will be writing about the Italian detective series.

And of course we will end with the questions we hope you have answers for:

  • Have you seen one of these and if so, what did you think of them?
  • Which ones did we forget about?
  • Do you feel they should be shown in the US with subtitles or be remade?
35 Comments
Comments (53)
Submit
Sort: Latest | Popular
Apr 12, 2014
Don't watch the british remake of Wallander, seriously, spare yourself the misery. It is truly dreadful, I feel like a part inside of me has died from wasting 90 minutes on its first episode. Just bloody watch the swedish one with subtitles!! The acting is not even comparable, truthfully, and if you want to watch a crime series set in Sweden which is what Wallander is, then why not watch ACTUAL Swedish policemen being swedish instead of a bunch of Brits pretending to be? I cringed so hard every single time they said a name, and I just honestly don't get it. This is an old post but I just recently suffered through the first episode so I had to say something!!!
Reply
Flag
Dec 02, 2013
Severely lacking some of our great woman detectives. They might not all suit my personal style but we do have the journalist Annika Bengtzon with X number of movies to date, and Erika Falk in Fjällbacka Murders. But also more police versions in Iréne Huss who is a total badass and Anne Holt. And maybe most notably Lizbeth Salander in the Millenium Series that has even had a Hollywood remake.
5
Reply
Flag
Dec 02, 2013
Yup and they are covered in the comments below. We didn't put a full coverage in the post. We want you to participate.
Thanks for joining the survey!

Cheers!
1
Reply
Flag
Dec 04, 2013
Thanks for the great thread. Just getting to know the shows/movies otherwise missed as they aren´t shown here is appreciated
Reply
Flag
Dec 02, 2013
I have to say I love these articles. And to support JossJunkie: How about Norway? We have some rather good detective series. Varg Veum being one of the more prominent ones. (Yes, I am Norwegian) Remember; Insomnia that Christopher Nolan remade was originally a Norwegian movie. :)
2
Reply
Flag
Dec 02, 2013
We'll think about it, but don't hold your breath. We ourselves must have seen enough series from a country to be able to give an honest advise. But we've got some time, there are enough in the planning.
Reply
Flag
Dec 03, 2013
I can't really ask anymore from you then that :) Thanks!
Reply
Flag
Dec 01, 2013
Also, I'd like to mention one of my favorites, Varg Veum, even though it's Norwegian not Swedish. I didn't see Norway in the list of upcoming posts and this one seemed the most appropriate. I loved Varg Veum...I loved the "lone wolf" aspect and Trond Espen Seim was perfect in the role. I liked how Varg had a different perspective since he came from a social work background not a police background and his soft spot for children. His antagonistic friendship with Hamre was also a highlight.

And in answer to your question, I live in the U.S. and I want them to show the original with subtitles. I prefer subtitles to dubbed English completely. I'm not completely opposed to the remakes since sometimes they can bring something new to the table or put their own spin on it which sometimes can be enjoyable, not to mention opening a story to a new audience that wouldn't watch the foreign version, but I want to see the original.
4
Reply
Flag
Dec 01, 2013
At this rate, it would seem that Sweden is beating Denmark in quantity but not in quality.

What do you guys think?
Reply
Flag
Dec 01, 2013
Anno 1790 is a great swedish detective show set in 1790 and featuring a war doctor who helps cops. It can be found with english subtitles.
It has evrything to make it great : it is a period drama set during the war between Sweden and Russia so the history is interesting, it has funny and dramatic moments and the actors are all great.
As a european myself, I find these posts very interesting. It gives greta ideas for Christmas gifts !
4
Reply
Flag
Jan 01, 2014
I watched the series and in the end, I really enjoyed it. The first episodes are a bit slow and the procedural murder mysteries are not the strongest, but the overall storyline on the Swedish developments in those days was entertaining.
Reply
Flag
Jan 01, 2014
I agree. It's not the procedural aspect of the show that interested me. The period drama taking place in a country I don't know during the French Revolution fascinated me.
Reply
Flag
Dec 22, 2013
THAT is something I need to see. I enjoy such series and would love to find the books the movie is based on. Obviously my love comes from the series of books by Margit Sandemo - The Ice People, which was extremely popular in Poland when I was a teenager. The setting in 18th century suits my interests very well :) Thanks for mentioning this!
Reply
Flag
Dec 23, 2013
You're welcome. It's always nice to discover new tv shows !
I haven't heard about The Ice People. Looks interesting. Thanks, I'll look for it on amazon. Hope it has been translated in english because I only know a few words in Polish !
Reply
Flag
Dec 26, 2013
It was translated but only three or four installments out of 47 :) The original title was Isfolket, I guess... can't remember but the saga began in 17th century and went through many historical events which were the background to family story (sorry if you find it too romance-like/ witchy-like). But I loved it and still return to it from time to time.
Reply
Flag
Dec 01, 2013
Good, Anno 1790 is really a new one for me, the first one in this post I have not seen. So thanks, I will be looking for it.
2
Reply
Flag
Dec 01, 2013
I'm not the biggest fan of historical/period drama so I didn't expect to like Anno 1790. But I was surprised to find I enjoyed it. The actors really sold it for me and like you said there was just enough humor.
1
Reply
Flag
Dec 01, 2013
It feels good that people are liking what we post!
Cheers!



1
Reply
Flag
Jan 06, 2014
Looks like csi but with wigs and bustiers .I'm in it!
I appreciate your effort.
Reply
Flag
Dec 01, 2013
Great series of posts! I've enjoyed several of these series. Of the Wallanders, my favorite is Krister Henriksson. I liked the other versions, particularly Kenneth Branagh's (bonus, Tom Hiddleston!), but I liked Krister's Wallander the best and also the supporting cast. Particularly Johanna Sallstrom and Ola Rapace.

Another series I would add is Irene Huss. I've enjoyed the storylines and Angela Kovacs does a great job in the lead.
1
Reply
Flag
Dec 01, 2013
Thanks for the kind words. I liked Henriksson the best too, but Branagh grew on me the last episodes. I've stiill got to watch the last three episodes with Henriksson 'but I don't like to see his personal drama. It will be a bit painfull.

I've seen Irene Huss and remeber it was pretty good.
1
Reply
Flag
Dec 02, 2013
I haven't seen the last batch of Branagh episodes yet, they haven't played here that I've seen. I love KB but Henriksson's Wallander felt more true and his connection with his onscreen daughter felt more real to me. So sad what happened to Johanna Sallstrom.
1
Reply
Flag
Dec 01, 2013
Thanks! Feels good to put some posts on the not-too-well-known series.

Twelve episodes of Detective Inspector Irene Huss.


1
Reply
Flag
Dec 01, 2013
Huge amount of effort must have gone into this, well done! Have to say personally I just don't have an interest in watching a tv show with subtitles, not because I have a problem with reading them (I don't mind for example if a tv show mixes languages as for example in the US version of The Bridge) but if a TV show is all subtitles I just feel disconnected from the characters and especially the actors as you miss all the nuances of their performance, if you're reading subtitles you miss what their faces are doing, where there eyes are, their body language etc. etc. I read so much information from that when watching any TV show that to lose it makes a TV show feel like something is missing.

I moved to Sweden with my wife in 2005 and was extremely pleased to discover that the BBC was doing a Wallander series set here but with an English speaking cast, and of course Kenneth Branagh is just amazing as Kurt. I've since listened to all of the audiobooks (still on the last one) including the one about Linda Wallander and really enjoyed them and every time Kurt is in the scene I of course see and here Kenneth!

One show missing off this list, possibly due to quality or perhaps you simply aren't aware of it is the Maria Stern series, I actually watched a few of those as it's set on Gotland which is where my wife and I moved to a couple of years ago, beautiful little island and it was great to see some of the places we knew in the TV series.


http://www.imdb.com/character/ch0256448/?ref_=tt_cl_t1
https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/876403.Anna_Jansson

More+
1
Reply
Flag
Dec 01, 2013
Sorry should be Maria Wern not Stern, meant to fix that, damn the lack of edit button!
1
Reply
Flag
Dec 01, 2013
Nope didn¨t forget about it, just thought you guys should have something to add. We could add The Fjällbacka Murders to that category.


There are ten episodes to this series so far. They are based off of the works by Camilla Läckberg.

We could add Inspector Van veeteren to the list as well. Håkan Nasser's books to films.
Nine episodes with Sven Wolter as Van Veeteren.


Basically, the posts would be too long of we wrote about all the good series we could find. We didn't put a quality filter on, so any series could have made it. The ones we picked were the most well known. And longest running.

Thanks for the comments.

/ Dave and Martijn




Reply
Flag
Dec 22, 2013
The Fjällbacka is really well-directed and magnificently played series. I always try to read a book before watching next movie and I'm usually nicely surprised that it wasn't destroyed by adaptation. But obviously - reading each book is like a punishment due to that "I-have-no-idea-who-gave-this-guy-ANY-job" figure - Steven T. Murray, who renders the original in the most hideous form of English, void of grammar and style, like each translation came straight from online translator and was slapped with his tiny attention. However each film - AMAZING. Love the setting chosen for filming, love the pace so well covering the spirit of books, actually, I love everything about it.
Reply
Flag
Dec 01, 2013
I enjoyed both Van Veeteren and Maria Wern. I liked Van Veeteren better though because I thought the supporting characters were explored more deeply and I liked them. I also liked the storyline regarding his son a lot.
Reply
Flag
Dec 01, 2013
What about the Millenium trilogy, based on Stieg Larsson's novels? The , adaptions of the second and third novels were developed as films made for TV, even though they made it to a theatrical release eventually. Besides, an extended cut of the films was shown on Swedish TV as a six-part miniseries, which I believe qualifies to be included in this post.

For those of you who wonder what exactly I am talking about, I'll just say that the first novel of the trilogy was filmed under its English title - "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo" (original title: "The Men Who Hated Women").

By the way, since you are doing Italy next, how far did you go? I have fond memories of "La Piovra", though it will probably look quite outdated if I get to see it now ...
3
Reply
Flag
Dec 01, 2013




The Millennium Trilogy

Author Stieg Larsson's books were filmed in Swedish (2010) and remade by David Fincher for a US version in 2011.

The mini-series ran for six episodes. Thanks Zhivik!


3
Reply
Flag
Dec 02, 2013
Simply the best, in every form. Check my avatar out. :)
2
Reply
Flag
Dec 01, 2013
I love La Piovra as well. It does look outdated now, but it's still oddly mesmerizing. But we'll get to that with the Italy post :)
Reply
Flag
Dec 01, 2013
We'll go back long enough on Italy to include a great one from the past.
1
Reply
Flag
Dec 01, 2013
You are correct that it would suit as a Tv-series. But then we could have included Hamilton as well. More a James Bond angle... Guess we could make a Daniel Craig angle on Swedish TV.

eAnyway a great suggestion. We'll add a paragraph on Millenium, here.
Reply
Flag
Follow this Topic
Members
82