The Vice Guide To Film

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  • 2010
    • Gaspar Noe Part 3 of 3
      Gaspar Noe Part 3 of 3
      Episode 20101013
      10/13/10
      0.0
      Argentinian born, French filmmaker Gaspar Noe is the most notorious punk rock auteur in cinema today. His first two films, “I Stand Alone” and “Irreversible,” are fucked up punch-in-the-face film experiences that combine dark sex with dark violence. And drugs. Gaspar is, on paper and in practice, the perfect Vice director. A few months ago our friend Harmony Korine called us going on and on about Gaspar, who was shooting a film in the sex clubs of Tokyo while using the Japanese Yakuza mafia as his “locations managers.” According to Harmony, the film set was like nothing he had every seen before. Gaspar was given unprecedented access to areas of Tokyo (Shinjuku and Kabukicho) that are literally off-limits to “gaijin” (foreigners) let alone to camera crews. Somehow Gaspar negotiated his way into the neighborhood for 3 months to shoot something called “Enter the Void.” The film is a psychedelic sex melodrama (he says) that he’s page script with no dialogue. Information about the film is sketchy at best and Gaspar Noe is notorious for not leaking information about his films beforehand. But with an introduction from Harmony and a Japanese cell phone number we decided that trying to find Gaspar Noe in Tokyo’s red light district was like the perfect Vice film storm. Along the way we recap the decade of sex, drugs and lunacy that defines all things VICE.moreless
    • Gaspar Noe Part 1 of 3
      Gaspar Noe Part 1 of 3
      Episode 20101011
      10/11/10
      0.0
      Argentinian born, French filmmaker Gaspar Noe
    • Inside Iranian Cinema Full Length
      5/28/10
      0.0
      In this special episode of The Vice Guide to Film, we explore Iranian Filmmaking. With as much political attention as Iran gets, it's fascinating to see the juxtaposition between what FOX News is warning about Iran and the beautifully touching, critically-acclaimed motion pictures that are being made within its borders. Ranked as one of the most dangerous countries for journalists to enter, the Vice crew tried for a year and a half to obtain a legitimate visa and were finally successful with the help of the 3rd International Urban Film Festival. In Tehran, Vice explores the evolution of Iranian Cinema in relation to the country's rich cultural history, and some of the people responsible for the amazing storytelling that Iranians are known for today. By the way, did you think Annette Bening was being held hostage? Well, she's not.moreless
    • Palestinian Filmmaking Part 3 of 3
      5/13/10
      0.0
      Shane follows Ahmad to a summer camp for young Palestinian filmmakers where participants learn to appreciate and understand Palestinian art and culture. It doesn’t take long before political realities turn the workshop retreat into a rally with Ahmad making declarations on behalf of his fellow refugees.
    • Palestinian Filmmaking Part 2 of 3
      5/12/10
      0.0
      On our return to Beirut, we catch up with Ahmad Iskandar to see what he’s shot with the camera we left him.
    • Palestinian Filmmaking Full Length
      5/12/10
      0.0
      Welcome to the Vice Guide to Film: Palestinian Filmmaking.While there a lot of different political factions in Lebanon, this particular episode of Vice Guide to Film focuses on Palestinian refugees and their burgeoning film scene. Film has become one of the most important mediums to get their message out.
    • Palestinian Filmmaking Part 1 of 3
      5/10/10
      0.0
      Welcome to the Vice Guide to Film: Palestinian Filmmaking.While there a lot of different political factions in Lebanon, this particular episode of Vice Guide to Film focuses on Palestinian refugees and their burgeoning film scene. Film has become one of the most important mediums to get their message out.
    • North Korean Film Madness: Full Length
      4/29/10
      0.0
      You could say that North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il has two primary obsessions: maintaining nuclear weapons capability as a means of protecting his "hermit kingdom," and thwarting pressure from outside forces like America and the rest of the industrialized world to open his country to modern things like electricity... and he's obsessed with film. He loves movies. It's rumored that he has one of the largest private film collections in the world. His favorite film is Gone with the Wind and his favorite actress is Elizabeth Taylor. He's a film collector and bona fide cinephile, but he's much more. He's everything really. He's a director, a producer, a financier, a costume maker, set designer, screenwriter, cameraman, sound engineer... and he's also a film theorist. His masterwork on aesthetics and practice is "On the Art of Cinema" (written and published in the early 1970s). In it he gives himself the humble title, "Genius of the Cinema." He built an extensive film studio in Pyongyang and when he couldn't find someone to make his film he did what any self-respecting eternal leader and great president would do... he kidnapped one. Vice founder Shane Smith visits North Korea to try and penetrate the Korean Feature Film Studio, the state-run film production facility west of Pyongyang: a sprawling lot that at its height produced around 40 films a year.moreless
    • North Korean Film Madness Part 3 of 3
      4/28/10
      0.0
      You could say that North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il has two primary obsessions: maintaining nuclear weapons capability as a means of protecting his “hermit kingdom,” and thwarting pressure from outside forces like America and the rest of the industrialized world to open his country to modern things like electricity… and he’s obsessed with film. He loves movies. It’s rumored that he has one of the largest private film collections in the world. His favorite film is Gone with the Wind and his favorite actress is Elizabeth Taylor. He’s a film collector and bona fide cinephile, but he’s much more. He’s everything really. He’s a director, a producer, a financier, a costume maker, set designer, screenwriter, cameraman, sound engineer… and he’s also a film theorist. His masterwork on aesthetics and practice is “On the Art of Cinema” (written and published in the early 1970s). In it he gives himself the humble title, “Genius of the Cinema.” He built an extensive film studio in Pyongyang and when he couldn’t find someone to make his film he did what any self-respecting eternal leader and great president would do… he kidnapped one. Vice founder Shane Smith visits North Korea to try and penetrate the Korean Feature Film Studio, the state-run film production facility west of Pyongyang: a sprawling lot that at its height produced around 40 films a year.moreless
    • North Korean Film Madness Part 1 of 3
      4/28/10
      0.0
      You could say that North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il has two primary obsessions: maintaining nuclear weapons capability as a means of protecting his “hermit kingdom,” and thwarting pressure from outside forces like America and the rest of the industrialized world to open his country to modern things like electricity… and he’s obsessed with film. He loves movies. It’s rumored that he has one of the largest private film collections in the world. His favorite film is Gone with the Wind and his favorite actress is Elizabeth Taylor. He’s a film collector and bona fide cinephile, but he’s much more. He’s everything really. He’s a director, a producer, a financier, a costume maker, set designer, screenwriter, cameraman, sound engineer… and he’s also a film theorist. His masterwork on aesthetics and practice is “On the Art of Cinema” (written and published in the early 1970s). In it he gives himself the humble title, “Genius of the Cinema.” He built an extensive film studio in Pyongyang and when he couldn’t find someone to make his film he did what any self-respecting eternal leader and great president would do… he kidnapped one. Vice founder Shane Smith visits North Korea to try and penetrate the Korean Feature Film Studio, the state-run film production facility west of Pyongyang: a sprawling lot that at its height produced around 40 films a year.moreless
    • North Korean Film Madness Part 2 of 3
      4/27/10
      0.0
      You could say that North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il has two primary obsessions: maintaining nuclear weapons capability as a means of protecting his “hermit kingdom,” and thwarting pressure from outside forces like America and the rest of the industrialized world to open his country to modern things like electricity… and he’s obsessed with film. He loves movies. It’s rumored that he has one of the largest private film collections in the world. His favorite film is Gone with the Wind and his favorite actress is Elizabeth Taylor. He’s a film collector and bona fide cinephile, but he’s much more. He’s everything really. He’s a director, a producer, a financier, a costume maker, set designer, screenwriter, cameraman, sound engineer… and he’s also a film theorist. His masterwork on aesthetics and practice is “On the Art of Cinema” (written and published in the early 1970s). In it he gives himself the humble title, “Genius of the Cinema.” He built an extensive film studio in Pyongyang and when he couldn’t find someone to make his film he did what any self-respecting eternal leader and great president would do… he kidnapped one. Vice founder Shane Smith visits North Korea to try and penetrate the Korean Feature Film Studio, the state-run film production facility west of Pyongyang: a sprawling lot that at its height produced around 40 films a year.moreless
    • North Korea Part 1 of 3
      North Korea Part 1 of 3
      Episode 20100426
      4/26/10
      0.0
      You could say that North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il has two primary obsessions: maintaining nuclear weapons capability as a means of protecting his “hermit kingdom,” and thwarting pressure from outside forces like from America and the rest of the industrialized world to open his country to modern things like electricity… and he’s obsessed with film. He loves movies. It’s rumored that he has one of the largest private film collections in the world. His favorite film is Gone with the Wind and his favorite actress is Elizabeth Taylor. He’s a film collector and bona fide cinephile, but he’s much more. He’s everything really. He’s a director, a producer, a financier, a costume maker, set designer, screenwriter, cameraman, sound engineer… and he’s also a film theorist. His masterwork on aesthetics and practice is “On the Art of Cinema” (written and published in the early 1970s). In it he gives himself the humble title, “Genius of the Cinema.” He built an extensive film studio in Pyongyang and when he couldn’t find someone to make his film. He did what any self-respecting eternal leader and great president would do, he kidnapped one. Vice founder Shane Smith visits North Korea to try and penetrate the Korean Feature Film Studio, the state-run film production facility west of Pyongyang: a sprawling lot that at its height produced around 40 films a year.moreless
    • Russian Parallel Cinema Part 3 of 3
      4/15/10
      0.0
      For 60 years, Russian film was dominated by the state-approved imagery of Socialist Realism: stark scenes of the proletariat; working, farming and soldiering. Making movies outside this milieu meant risking life and limb at the hands of the KGB. When the Soviet Union collapsed, and that threat diminished, Russian filmmakers released six decades of pent-up creative energy. The films that emerged were an insane mish mash of booze, violence, surrealism, and insanity. Thus Parallel Cinema was born.moreless
    • Russian Parallel Cinema Part 2 of 3
      4/13/10
      0.0
      For 60 years, Russian film was dominated by the state-approved imagery of Socialist Realism: stark scenes of the proletariat; working, farming and soldiering. Making movies outside this milieu meant risking life and limb at the hands of the KGB. When the Soviet Union collapsed, and that threat diminished, Russian filmmakers released six decades of pent-up creative energy. The films that emerged were an insane mish mash of booze, violence, surrealism, and insanity. Thus Parallel Cinema was born.moreless
    • Russian Parallel Cinema Part 1 of 3
      4/12/10
      0.0
      For 60 years, Russian film was dominated by the state-approved imagery of Socialist Realism: stark scenes of the proletariat; working, farming and soldiering. Making movies outside this milieu meant risking life and limb at the hands of the KGB. When the Soviet Union collapsed, and that threat diminished, Russian filmmakers released six decades of pent-up creative energy. The films that emerged were an insane mish-mash of booze, violence, surrealism, and insanity. Thus Parallel Cinema was born.moreless
    • Mexican Narco Cinema: Full Length
      4/2/10
      0.0
      Drugs and film; these are the two basic elements that make up the hugely popular Narco Cinema genre currently coming out of Mexico. They also happen to be two topics that Vice is very interested in. For the First installment in the Vice Guide To Film series, Co-Founder Shane Smith travels from Texas to Tijuana to immerse himself in the seedy, fast-paced, and prolific world of films inspired by (and often funded by) Mexico’s ultra violent drug cartels.moreless
    • Mexican Narco Cinema Part 2 of 3
      3/29/10
      0.0
      After a brief history of Mexican film explaining the rise of straight-to-video B-movies, Shane gets decked out in narco-duds and gets a mariachi elegy. By the days end, we’re off to Tijuana to play a walk-on roll in the “Chrysler 300” movie series.
    • Mexican Narco Cinema Part 1 of 3
      3/29/10
      0.0
      Shane takes a trip to Austin, Texas to beef up on narco trivia before heading down to Mexico. Once in Cuernavaca, Mexico we meet Mario Almada, the John Wayne of Mexican film. He’s been in more movies than any other person alive today.
    • The Vice Guide To Film Trailer
      3/15/10
      0.0
      The Vice Guide Film airs Monday, March 22nd.